‘A’ team set to start season

first_imgAfter a successful 2006 season, the bar has been set high for the Wisconsin women’s cross country team. The Badgers earned a No. 5 ranking in the season’s first U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coach’s Association poll.Last weekend, Wisconsin’s reserves ran a successful meet at the UW-Platteville Open to start off the season. This weekend, the top runners return to the course for the first time in 2007 at the Carroll College Invitational. The race is set to take place at Minooka Park in Waukesha.Along with Carroll College, Wisconsin will face six other colleges and a track club. Of those competing, Wisconsin represents the lone Division I team at this event. Despite this, the Badgers are still bringing their A-game.”Our A-team is competing for the first time this season,” head coach said Jim Stinzi, who is returning for his fourth year.Last season, Stinzi led the Badgers to a fourth-place finish at the 2006 NCAA Championship, making it their best season in seven years. The team has some big shoes to fill, however, after the graduation of a talented group of seniors.”We lost two top-five runners from the Big Ten and National meet this year,” Stinzi said. “Katrina Rundhaug and ‘A Havahla Haynes will be missed.”Even with the loss of Rundhaug and Haynes, the Badgers still have 13 letter winners from last year’s NCAA-qualifying team returning for another season.Because of that, Stinzi remains confident about his team’s chances this season.Not only was Grinaker named the Big Ten Freshman of the Year after finishing third at the conference meet last season, but she was also named an All-American for her performance. Plus, she’s stepping in for the departed seniors, acting as a mentor to her teammates.”Sophomore Hanna Grinaker is filling the role of team leader,” Stinzi said.She is not the only returning player to look out for. Freshman Cassie Hintz is planning on stepping up this season after redshirting last year. Senior Ann Detmer is also looking to contribute in what will be her final year as a Badger.As Saturday looms near, the team remains in good health, which under Stinzti, has been a pressing concern.Still, not everyone is at 100 percent. “Our team is relatively healthy,” Stintzi said. “[My] goal is to keep everyone healthy and competitive.”Beyond getting his A-team back out on the course, Stinzi is using Saturday as an indicator to determine who of the younger athletes on the team might be best suited to fill the seven and nine spots for later in the season. The freshmen last season played a key role in their success. Therefore, the progress of the new runners will be important to the team’s growth.”It’s too early to have expectations,” Stinzi said. “But I’m excited to see how the season unfolds.”last_img read more

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Fool me once: Orange looks to avoid 2nd upset versus Le Moyne

first_img Comments Published on November 8, 2010 at 12:00 pm After Syracuse’s shocking exhibition loss to Le Moyne a year ago, Jim Boeheim made it clear that the Orange learned nothing from its previous game against Cal State-Los Angeles. It had dismantled the Golden Eagles by 43. It didn’t prepare the Orange for the following game, nine days later. That game, a much-publicized upset loss to Le Moyne, was the first part of the learning process that ultimately led SU to a No. 1 ranking. ‘The first game didn’t help us,’ Boeheim said after the 2009 loss to Le Moyne. ‘I thought (Cal State-Los Angeles) didn’t attack us very well. They just moved the ball around and took shots that weren’t really good shots. ‘It was too easy.’ With the three-point loss to the Dolphins in 2009, an entire city saw a game that was the furthest thing from easy. SU’s cross-town little brother had gone into the Carrier Dome and stolen a meaningless game from the Orange.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text But following the loss, Boeheim maintained that this loss was, in fact, a game from which his team could take meaning. It could learn from the loss, unlike the previous win. One year later, Boeheim’s postgame comments following the Orange’s eerily similar 96-60 win over Kutztown last Tuesday were in stark contrast to his remarks from last year. The similarities might be there in the team’s exhibition openers from 2009 and 2010. The scores are nearly identical. The feelings to the games were much the same. In both years, a surprising freshman stole the show. In 2009, it was James Southerland and his team-leading 19 points. This year, it was C.J. Fair. But the Orange learned lessons with the win this time around. And as a result, Boeheim doesn’t anticipate another shocking loss for the No. 10 Orange. ‘I thought we played well,’ Boeheim said. ‘We played against a team that knows what they are doing, they win and they’re smart. Obviously we have a size advantage, but we forced a lot of turnovers, which is a good sign when we are playing against a smaller team. ‘I thought it was a good night out.’ Boeheim will be looking for another similar progressive performance from his 2010 team when Le Moyne returns to the Dome Tuesday at 7 p.m. for the first time since its monumental upset last year. The Dolphins, who finished 18-10 in the 2009-10 regular season after defeating SU, lost its two leading scorers from last season, Damani Corbin and Laurence Ekperigin. But the Dolphins return junior guard Chris Johnson, the man who silenced Syracuse fans last year with a game-winning 3-pointer with nine seconds left. The goat last year was SU forward Kris Joseph, as he failed to contest Johnson’s final shot as Boeheim desired. But after Syracuse’s win over Kutztown last week, there was no mention of Johnson or last year from Joseph. He was in the moment, speaking of what he felt the SU youngsters did well in their initial outing versus Kutztown. The Orange’s freshmen and juniors started the second half against Kutztown together, instead of Joseph and his fellow starters. And Joseph was addressing that, not Johnson. ‘Every year I feel like we have seven guys who get the bulk of the time,’ Joseph said in the SU locker room following the Kutztown game. ‘But we also have guys eight, nine, and 10 — guys who are just as good. … So I think Coach (Boeheim) just really wants to get them into the game, even for eight minutes, just to see what they can do.’ In the loss to Le Moyne last year, the Orange was ridiculed for its poor man-to-man defensive play against a much less athletic team. After the game, Boeheim said he played the majority of the game in man, not SU’s trademark 2-3 zone, to analyze the tape of SU playing man for later in the season. The approach wasn’t so much for winning the game as it was using exhibition time to learn about his team. But what ensued was an exhibition from Le Moyne in slashing and cutting for shots against a lazy man defense. It was exemplified on Johnson’s game-winning shot. This time around, Boeheim has already experienced one game in which his team executed against a smart team. The lessons were learned in Game 1, rather than saving them for a crash course in Game 2. But he took the time out to commend the play of SU’s two main big men for the 2010-11 season: Rick Jackson and Fab Melo. ‘Rick (Jackson) got us off to a great start,’ Boeheim said. ‘I think Rick and Fab (Melo) have worked well together for it just being a couple weeks so far, and I think that’s a promising thing.’ Against the Dolphins, Jackson and Melo will be called upon to perform well against their slashing style of basketball. After the 2009 loss, Boeheim let it be known that he felt former SU center Arinze Onuaku had trouble against the much smaller Dolphins bigs last year. The struggles were a main factor in SU losing. And Jackson thinks Melo will be able to facilitate an Orange win. Unlike Onuaku last year, Melo will be able to run the floor unhindered. That mobility helps against the pesky little brother from the same city. ‘I think he is a great big guy. Seven-foot and mobile,’ Jackson said. ‘He is definitely going to get better. … He did a good job tonight.’ aolivero@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Bradley’s stellar youth falls short in Syracuse’s 1st-ever title game, offers promise for future

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ COLLEGE PARK, Md. — In the stands at Maryland’s Field Hockey and Lacrosse Complex, Ange Bradley saw some of the same players she coached at the beginning of her career, at Goucher College (Md.).She worked the same sideline where her mentor and former boss, Missy Meharg, coaches the Terrapins. Bradley was in her second home.“You always got to think it’s your weekend, right?” Bradley said.After knocking off the No. 1 team in the country in North Carolina on Friday, her Orange dominated the defending national champions Sunday — in every way but the scoreboard. Fourth-seeded Syracuse fell a goal short and mere inches wide, losing to third-seeded Connecticut, 1-0, in the national championship Sunday afternoon.It left Bradley with the best postseason run of her SU career and a team that’s almost entirely returning next season — happy facts she said she won’t be able to think about for a couple weeks.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We wrote the last page of our history for the 2014 season and I think all of us would have a different ending, but we did make history,” Bradley said.In the second half of Sunday’s game, Bradley didn’t have to venture far from her bench. SU’s attack had UConn locked into its own defensive half.She only had to take a few steps toward the sideline to urge Lies Lagerweij forward or tell midfielder Lieke Visser to do the same — “Get in the circle, friend,” she shouted.With 21 seconds left, Bradley reminded captain Emma Russell that she could ask the referee for a review of the Orange’s upcoming penalty corner if it didn’t go in. The shot was blocked, but Russell never asked for the review.“I just — was focused on the ball,” Russell said.Right in front of Bradley, a 25-yard shot from Visser with 11:29 left struck the tire on the outside of UConn goalkeeper Nina Klein’s goal. Lagerweij dribbled through the Huskies’ defense with ease and Russell led an SU forecheck that never left the defending champs breathe in the second half.Russell is tied for sixth in the country with .91 goals per game, and is just a junior. Visser is 10th in the country with .77 assists per game, and she’s a freshman. Lagerweij, also a freshman, made the NCAA all-tournament team.“No. 9, the Dutch center back, she just was a lock on the door,” UConn head coach Nancy Steven said.As Bradley talked among her assistant coaches and watched the UConn players collect the national championship plaques her players all but won, the team that stood in front of her won’t look much different from the one she starts coaching again in the spring.Before this weekend, Bradley had never advanced past the national semifinals.There were only three seniors — Kati Nearhouse, who also earned all-tourney honors, Jordan Page and Lauren Brooks — to say goodbye to afterward. Bradley’s Orange had pulled itself out of an 0-3 start to ACC play, largely on the backs of underclassmen.None of that mattered in the moments following the Huskies’ victory against the run of play. Just the loss and, eventually, starting over in January.Said Bradley: “It’s just numb right now.” Comments Published on November 23, 2014 at 5:08 pm Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_last_img read more

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USA Today names USC top water polo program

first_imgSwimming in success · Sophomore goalie McQuin Baron and the Trojans look to avenge last season’s championship loss to the rival Bruins. – Mariya Dondonyan | Daily TrojanThough the men’s water polo team might have had a vacation from classes, they’ve had a busy summer both in the pool and in the news.USA Today recently rated USC the top university for men’s water polo. This honor was bestowed on the university based on both its athletic prowess as well as its academic reputation.USC has won a total of nine national championships with an unmatched six in a row from 2008 to 2013.Last year, the Trojans fell just short in an upset by crosstown rival UCLA in the championship game. The team complemented their deep playoff run with a successful regular season in which they finished with an overall record of 24-7.Over the past two seasons, the Trojans have combined for an impressive record of 52-11 as well as the 2014 national championship.A main reason for USC’s dominant history is head coach Jovan Vavic. Vavic has served as both the men’s and women’s coach for the past 20 years at USC and has seen tremendous success in his time as part of the Trojan Family.Vavic has a win percentage of .868, which equals an outstanding record of 448-68. The impressive streak of championships that only recently came to an end with a second place finish, the Trojans extended their streak of nearly 10 season in which the team has not finished lower than second in the country, dating back to 2005.As a team included in the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, Vavic has a record of 311-66, a win percentage of .825 against Federation teams since 1995. Outside of the MPSF, Vavic has recorded only two losses in his 19-year career.Not only has Vavic seen success coaching each of the men’s and women’s teams, he has also won both championships in the same year four times,  most recently in the 2012-13 season.His 13 national championships make Vavic the coach with the most national championships of any coach in USC’s decorated athletic history. Vavic has also been named coach of the year 12 times nationally and 10 times by the MPSF.Vavic’s success has rubbed off on his players as well. Ten of his players have won the Cutino Award, the most prestigious award in water polo.In the pool, the Trojans have been just as successful this summer.In July, recent graduate Nikola Vavic and current goalie McQuin Baron helped the U.S. Men’s team secure their place in the 2016 Rio Olympics with a semifinal win over Canada in the Pan American Games. Team USA went on to win the championship with a win over future host Brazil in the final.The men’s water polo team will return to the pool this fall in hopes of bringing back another national title to USC.last_img read more

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Syracuse faces 3 of last season’s Final 4 teams in 2016

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse will face the three other national semifinalists from 2015 this upcoming season, SU Athletics announced in a release Tuesday with the Orange’s full 2016 schedule. Syracuse also reached the Final Four last season. It’s the fourth consecutive year that the Orange will play three of the previous season’s Final Four teams. The schedule also features 11 total teams from the 2015 NCAA tournament.“Once again this season, we will have the toughest schedule in the country,” said Syracuse head coach Gary Gait in the release. “To be the best, you have to play the best.”SU fell short of the program’s first-ever national title last season when it lost to Maryland 10-8 in the national semifinal. It was the fourth consecutive year the Orange had made it that far in the tournament. SU also won its first Atlantic Coast Conference championship and finished 16-8 overall.Syracuse gets a chance to avenge its season-ending loss as the defending national champion Terrapins visit the Carrier Dome on March 12.SU starts its season on Feb. 14 with a split doubleheader. The first game features a rematch of last season’s NCAA tournament quarterfinals with Loyola. The second game is against Binghamton. The Orange then play another split doubleheader on Feb. 21 against Wagner and Marist. Wagner is coached by former SU assistant coach and Orange All-American Katie Rowan.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse then plays four consecutive games against 2015 NCAA tournament teams. Two at home against Northwestern (Feb. 28) and Florida (March 1) before its first road game and ACC opener against Virginia (March 5).SU returns to the Dome to play Maryland then has road dates with Harvard (March 16), Boston College (March 19) and Notre Dame (March 26). The team fits in two games at the Dome, Connecticut (March 29) and and Duke (April 3), before another road stretch. The Orange will face Canisius (April 5), Virginia Tech (April 9) and Albany (April 12).North Carolina, a 2015 national semifinalist, visits Syracuse on April 16 and then SU travels to Cornell on April 19. SU hosts its regular-season finale against Louisville on April 23.The 2016 ACC tournament will take place on April 28-May 1 in Blacksburg, Virginia. Comments Published on December 15, 2015 at 4:37 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TRlast_img read more

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Steinbauer’s UW career over with torn ACL; Badgers prep for Wolverines

first_imgNot much went well for the Wisconsin women’s basketball team against Iowa, as star forward Tara Steinbauer was lost for the season – and the rest of her career – with a torn ACL in her right knee, but the Badgers will nevertheless be looking to stay in contention for a Big Ten Championship Saturday against Michigan.After a difficult 59-44 loss to the Hawkeyes on the road, the schedule isn’t easing up for the Badgers (14-11, 9-4 Big Ten), as they now have to take on a team they lost to earlier this year. The Wolverines (15-10, 8-5) are coming off a comfortable win over Indiana, and will not allow the Badgers a chance to recover from their loss.Saturday’s match up will be especially emotional since it’s Senior Day for the Badgers, who are playing in their second-to-last regular season game at the Kohl Center.“I could say I don’t think about it, but in the back of my mind we’re all going to be thinking about that we only have two more games at the Kohl Center,” senior forward Lin Zastrow said. “…You can think about it, but it also should just motivate you … you want to finish on a high note and just have fun with it.”Steinbauer, though, will be absent. She went down in the first two minutes against Iowa and will have surgery at a date to be later determined.“It is very unfortunate and I feel very sorry for Tara,” UW head coach Lisa Stone said. “All four of our seniors have been injured this season and unfortunately for Tara, hers is the most severe. Our team has gone through this several times this season and our players know to be ready. Anya Covington, Cassie Rochel and Ashley Thomas are all ready to step up.”Beyond the injury and the Senior Day factor, this game is crucial for Wisconsin to keep their Big Ten Championship and NCAA Tournament hopes alive. With the loss to Iowa, the players and coaches realize these final three games are must-wins.In their first match up with Michigan, the Badgers spent most of the game trailing and struggled to find a consistent offensive rhythm. The Wolverines’ three-point shooting was also a major factor in the first game, as they made 11 three-pointers and shot over 45 percent from beyond the arc.“I think we just broke down with our principles [in the first game],” senior guard Alyssa Karel said. “They kind of stretched us out a little bit, were making threes. “… Kind of got to a lot more one-on-one as opposed to the team basketball that we’re usually playing, which is when we’re at our strongest.”The Wolverines are led by senior guard Veronica Hicks, who averages 11.8 points and 5.4 rebounds per game and is complemented by junior guard/forward Carmen Reynolds, who puts up an average of 10.4 per game. A deep and athletic team, Michigan has five players who average more than seven points per contest.Hicks and Reynolds both hit the 20-point mark in their first game against Wisconsin, and the Badgers will need to rely on their strong defense to contain them in this game.“Michigan really played well at Michigan again the first time around, and I thought we didn’t compete, and that’s the first time that we haven’t in a long time,” assistant coach Ty Margenthaler said. “…They’re a tough team to defend because they run a really nice, tough motion offense. …We’re going to have to prepare, we’re going to have to be really mentally ready, and it’s going to take a group effort for sure.”Although Wisconsin is hoping for things to go better this time around against Michigan, it is still focusing on the tough defense and inside play that has the Badgers sitting at third place in the Big Ten.“It’s just kind of doing the same things that got us here in the first place,” Karel said. “We’re coming down to the point in the season where every game is a crucial, imperative game, and just going in there with that mentality [is important].”Without Steinbauer, the Badgers will have to rely on junior Anya Covington and freshman Cassie Rochel. Wisconsin has been powered by its trio of seniors in Karel, Zastrow and Steinbauer, and pulling off a victory against the Wolverines will be even more of a challenge without a major piece of its inside game.UW’s goal is to win a Big Ten title, and the Badgers need to win this game to achieve it.“We want to win a Big Ten Championship; it’s never been done in [UW] history,” Margenthaler said. “This has been a special senior class, this is what I want for these girls and that would be a great dream to walk out of here with a Big Ten Championship.”last_img read more

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Extra Innings: Folt has work to do within USC Athletics

first_imgAs mentioned before, there is no way USC is corruption-free. The first step to solving a problem is acknowledging there is one. In this case, USC must acknowledge all of them. Before taking significant action, the entire closet must be clear of skeletons, whether it is Heritage Hall or USC as a whole. This scandal is just the tip of the iceberg, and there has to be more. Meanwhile, the University was hobbling around with an interim president. By no means do I think Interim President Wanda Austin did a poor job, but it’s just hard to believe the University can make significant strides forward while a temp is in charge. The most appealing thing about Folt is that she has publicly stated that the decisions she will make at the helm of USC will not be impulsive. The announcement of a new USC president in Carol Folt really excites me. She knows how to get things done, and specifically how to deal with issues pertaining to collegiate athletics. As the 11th Chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she was the face for the clean-up efforts of one of the worst collegiate academic and athletic scandals in history. Sam Arslanian is a sophomore writing about sports. His column, “Extra Innings,” runs Fridays. Perhaps Folt will find that significant leadership changes must be made to USC’s athletics department. UNC offered “no-show” classes that were abused by both students and student-athletes under the previous three chancellors. She led UNC in the aftermath of the scandal with just a year-long probation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. UNC did not face charges from the NCAA since the NCAA does not interfere with the academic programs of its universities. The University is in shambles. For the past two years, USC has been on a runaway roller coaster. center_img “I’m a scientist and a researcher, so I’m going to do what I have always done,” she said in an interview with The New York Times. “I’m going to gather the facts. So it can’t be any faster than it takes to make thoughtful decisions.” For the first time in two years, I am optimistic about the future of my university, and other students and alumni should be as well. It’s important to understand that there will be growing pains in this new administration, but as of now, I have full confidence in Folt to discover more issues and properly address them to restore this university to the academic and athletic powerhouse it was. While this issue, similar to USC’s current scandal, is more of an academic problem than an athletic scandal like that involving Bush, it’s important to recognize her expertise in cleaning up the University to ensure that further scandals are prevented. As an incoming freshman, I witnessed news break about a meth-smoking dean who solicited prostitutes. I thought I had seen it all. What could possibly be bigger than the head of a renowned medical school getting locked up for felony drug charges? Boy, was I wrong. As a sports journalist, I naturally began to regard USC’s athletic programs as its only stable department. Yes, USC has conducted some shady athletic business with the whole Reggie Bush incident (even though he didn’t play here). I had thought USC Athletics learned its lesson from the harsh sanctions set forth by the NCAA from the violations of the amateurism rules. But once again, I was wrong; more skeletons have been pulled out of USC’s closet. In case you haven’t turned on a TV, read a newspaper or talked to literally anyone in the past week, two senior USC Athletics officials were arrested for taking bribes to falsely recruit “athletes” to guarantee students admission into the University. This was the cherry on top to deem USC as the University of Scandals and Corruption. last_img read more

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Athletes in Arms: Recovery in a world of pain

first_imgAt this current moment in time, I wish the Bucks were the biggest story coming out of Wisconsin. Instead, just two days ago, Jacob Blake, a Black man in Kenosha, was shot seven times in the back by police — a 45-minute drive from where I grew up.  So until this happens, focus will be on national reform, not a playoff series.  “When we take the court and represent Milwaukee and Wisconsin, we are expected to play at a high level, give maximum effort and hold each other accountable,” the Bucks’ statement read. “We hold ourselves to that standard, and in this moment, we are demanding the same from our lawmakers and law enforcement.” In the wake of the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and countless other Black Americans, backlash arose from several players in the league to whether they should be playing when the Black Lives Matter movement had an international spotlight. Now after another incident of police brutality, players have circled back to the same concern from early July.  With the absence of competition for the past five months, this void has been filled with an oversaturation of news regarding the election, the current global pandemic and protests for racial equality.  This leaves me wondering: Once I begin competing again for volleyball, will my priority have to be playing volleyball? Does this mean I have to sacrifice being an active participant in the fight for social justice? Is there a balance between the two despite the mental energy that each drains? All these questions apply, but with even more urgency, for Black athletes as they have to actively consider their priorities in tandem with their own community of family and friends.  Instead of seeing his next opponent in the playoffs as the biggest threat to be concerned about, a veteran star of the league sees police in the United States as the biggest threat. Even a man standing at 6-foot-9, 250 pounds and earning hundreds of millions of dollars a year still shares a common fear of police that many in the Black community face today.  After reading the Bucks’ statement on the situation following initial reactions, I hear echoes of the same principles that resonate in my own USC volleyball program. Across all levels of competition, from high school to professional, a central principle of teamwork is accountability. A team cannot function to its highest potential without its members holding themselves and each other accountable. In this moment, our government will not perform its highest duty of representing its people unless we hold it and ourselves accountable.  When I decided to join the Daily Trojan team, I thought that I would be able to use my status as a student-athlete at USC to write about how my peers in athletics have navigated the recent surge in the fight against racial injustice.  Speaking from my experience as a collegiate volleyball player, schoolwork always comes first with volleyball following close behind in terms of personal priorities. With the time, mental toughness and physical endurance needed to invest in these activities, this leaves little room for awareness of the larger world around me. About 12 hours after finishing the first draft of this column, I received a notification that the Bucks had not taken the court in their Game 5 matchup to protest the shooting of Blake. “Quite frankly it’s just fucked up in our community,” James said in a press conference after Monday’s Game 4 win over the Portland Trail Blazers. “And I said it, I know people get tired of hearing me say it, but we are scared as Black people in America. Black men, Black women, Black kids — we are terrified.”center_img “We shouldn’t have even [come] to this damn place, to be honest,” George Hill, a guard for the Milwaukee Bucks, said in a press conference Monday. “Coming here just took all the focal points off what the issues are. But we’re here. It is what it is. We can’t do anything from right here. But I think definitely when it all settles, some things need to be done.” With a strong 3-1 series lead over Portland, James would normally be concerned with his next opponent, the winner of the Houston Rockets and Oklahoma City Thunder matchup, who are both playing at the top of their games at the moment.  For my debut in this sports column, however, I felt the need to talk about a recent tragedy that hit too close to home.  Once the clock has expired and all the preparation has been done for the next game, how will their minds and bodies recover when they return to a world that is still in pain? I am originally from Milwaukee, Wis. I grew up going to Bucks, Brewers and Packers games. The Bucks currently are on the road to advancing in the NBA Playoffs with reigning league MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo, bringing loads of excitement to the city.  I was moved with immense pride by the leadership that my hometown team showed. My pride immediately grew even more as the Brewers followed suit, and eventually within the hour, the NBA had postponed every game that day to show solidarity with the players’ sentiments — all starting with the Bucks’ initial leadership. This widespread concern is all separate from the fact that the world is in the midst of a pandemic that has postponed collegiate sports across several major conferences, including the Pac-12. I cannot speak for every athlete; however, this absence of sports and national focus on injustices has altered my perception of where my priorities land at this moment in time. Going into the NBA bubble, racial injustice was already at the center of attention for the league as players put statements on the back of their jerseys, knelt for the national anthem in unity and most overtly, played on a court with “Black Lives Matter” written in large, bolded letters.  As the NBA wraps up the first round of playoffs, players would normally be dialed into finishing their respective series and looking forward to the next matchup. In light of current events, many star players, including LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers, shifted their attention to what happened in Wisconsin.  Americans have always found solace in sports, as it offers a distraction from the worries of life at home. For the average fan, watching a game may help them forget the pressures of their work and everyday life. For the player, the game is their work. After the final buzzer, muscles and bones are going to need recovery. Film will need to be studied and preparations begin for the next game.  Liam Schroeder is a junior writing about sports and social justice. He is also a middle blocker on the USC men’s volleyball team. His column, “Athletes in Arms,” runs every Thursday.last_img read more

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Tivoli Gardens documentary wins award

first_imgJamaica’s Tivoli Gardens incursion documentary wins award at US film festivalJamaican producer, writer, director, Sasha-Gay Lewis won the Best Short Documentary at the Los Angeles Film and Script Festival for her script for documentary The Incursion.The documentary also won an honorable mention award at the Los Angeles Documentary Film Festival on the past weekend.Character driven documentaryThe Incursion is a character-driven documentary that highlights the 2010 raid by a joint police and army force on the inner-city community of Tivoli Gardens in Jamaica. The raid was meant to search and find then Jamaican notorious fugitive Christopher “Dudus” Coke who was being sought to be extradited to the United States. Several people were killed in the raid as residents resisted the invasion of the armed security forces.The film provides an affecting account of what happened on that fateful day in May 23, 2010, and the lingering effects on the lives of those who survived the raid.Gave her all“For the past year or so I have given my all to getting this film done and done well. There were many challenges but I kept at it, confident that this is a story worth telling. These awards are confirmation of that truth,” Lewis said.Born in Jamaica, Lewis has been writing and producing content for television and radio for over 10 years. She has written, produced and directed several short documentaries in Jamaica, Belize, and the US.The Incursion was also awarded an Impact Doc award and is an official selection of the Pembroke Taparelli Arts and Film Festival.last_img read more

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Miss Sunrise Side looking for participants for ‘Mock Rock’ Competition

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Alpena, Mich— It’s that time of year again! The Miss Sunrise Side Scholarship program is gearing up for their annual Mock Rock event.The scholarship program is currently looking for those who would like to participate. The event will be held on March 9th at Alcona High School will and will have different categories for attendees to enjoy including a lip sync competition, as well as a singing competition.All ages and talents are welcomed. If you would like to participate contact Ann Kramer at:Miss.sunriseside.mi@gmail.com 989-619-8245AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Group of Seniors currently collecting recycled plastic bags to create blankets for HomelessNext Today’s ‘Photo of the Day’ sent in by Mike Dotschlast_img read more

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