Macy Gray To Perform At Face Forward Gala

first_imgThe Annual Face Forward Gala, titled “A Gatsby Affair,” which is being held at the stunning Fairmont Miramar Hotel in Santa Monica on September 28, is proud to announce their honorees and musical talent.CEO/Founder Mrs Deborah Alessi today confirmed that Grammy winning superstar Macy Gray will be performing at this spectacular event. Miss Gray is a long time supporter of various charities and is a true example of giving back musically to causes she cares deeply about, especially Face Forward.Also performing on this special evening, singer/actress Stacy Francis. Miss Francis has also taken the incredibly generous step of donating 3% of sales from her upcoming album sales to the Face Forward charity.Face Forward provides pro bono surgeries for victims of domestic abuse and Miss Francis herself is a survivor. She said, “It is my honor as a survivor of domestic abuse I know that recovery can be very hard. I am a proud supporter of The Face Forward foundation and so proud of the work they do to help women and children regain their confidence and have hope for a better future.”Television talk show star Dr. Phil McGraw will also he honored along with his charitable, caring wife Dr Robin McGraw. They will share the Face Forward Voice Award, which may be accepted in absentia.The 2013 Community Philanthropic Award will be presented to Jake Kloberdanz CEO/Founder of ONEHOPE wine who donate 50% of profits to various charities. Mr Kloberdanz said, “I am deeply honored to be a part of this special evening, my everyday life is spent dealing with many charities and I am extremely impressed with Face Forward and their critical mission, they are a very important charity.”The Gatsby themed evening consists of full red carpet with many celebrities in attendance, cocktail hour in the hotels lavish gardens with a silent auction, followed by a gourmet dinner, live auction and the evening ’s entertainment. The event is sponsored by Torrey Pines, Turkish Airlines, Alessi Institute, Luna Gardens Events and Maple Counselling Center (who provide extremely discounted pricing for therapy for Face Forward patients).Honorary Committee members for the 2013 gala include Tom Arnold, Bonnie Somerville, Charlotte Ross, Jennifer Coolidge, Shaun Toub and more.Find out more here.last_img read more

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James Cromwell To Spend 75th Birthday Protesting Cruel Experiments On Monkeys

first_imgAcademy Award nominee and longtime PETA activist James Cromwell has big plans for his 75th birthday — moderating PETA’s Capitol Hill congressional briefing on the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) maternal-deprivation experiments on baby monkeys.Along with a panel of experts, Cromwell will point to the cruelty of the experiments, their inapplicability to human health, and the superior non-animal research methods available to study mental illness.“By the time you get to be my age, you start to think that maybe you’ve seen it all — and then you realize that you haven’t. When I first heard that PETA had released videos of maternal deprivation experiments on baby monkeys, I guessed it was some kind of retrospective,” says Cromwell. “These barbaric experiments weren’t justifiable 60 years ago. They certainly aren’t justified in the 21st century, and they do not deserve the support of Congress and taxpayers.”As revealed in video footage released by PETA, NIH experimenters at a laboratory in Maryland breed monkeys to be prone to depression, remove infants from their mothers at birth to induce trauma, and then subject the young ones to years of experiments designed to cause, worsen, and measure the babies’ severe fear, depression, and anxiety. These experiments have never led to the development of treatments for human mental illness and are superseded by human brain imaging and other modern techniques but have continued for more than 30 years and cost taxpayers more than $30 million in just the past seven years alone.Last year, Cromwell caged himself at the Los Angeles International Airport to protest Air France’s practice of flying thousands of terrified monkeys to laboratories, where they’re caged, cut into, poisoned, and killed. In 2013, the Oscar-nominated Babe star was arrested for interrupting a meeting at the University of Wisconsin–Madison to protest the school’s cruel and deadly brain experiments on cats.Source:PETAlast_img read more

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MakeAWish And ESPN Highlight Inspiring Wishes

first_imgAthletes need more than talent to reach the top. They also need perseverance and courage – just like Make-A-Wish kids.You can see, then, why so many wish kids look up to world-class athletes as their roles models.This year, ESPN SportCenter has been giving you an insider’s view of Make-A-Wish kids who meet their favorite athletes. Between Sunday, July 19 and Thursday, July 23, SportsCenter has been highlighting one inspiring wish a day. Viewers have experienced five unique wishes that feature the following wish granters: the San Francisco 49ers, Olympic gold -medalist Michael Phelps, WWE Superstar John Cena, the Pittsburgh Pirates’ Andrew McCutchen, and Minnesota Lynx player Maya Moore.SportsCenter will air a one-hour “My Wish” special on Thursday, July 23 with highlights from all five wishes. Viewers can tune into a special showcase on Saturday, July 25. Each story may also be viewed at ESPN.com following its original air date.Make-A-Wish extends its thanks to Disney and ESPN for their support of this year’s “My Wish” series, and for their help in creating these incredible wish experiences and sharing them with the world. Beyond assisting with this year’s series, Disney – which owns ESPN – has been a steadfast friend of Make-A-Wish for 35 years and has helped the organization grant nearly 100,000 Disney-related wishes, including the first official wish in 1980.Source:wish.orglast_img read more

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ASPCA Young Friends Benefit To Take Place Next Week

first_imgThe ASPCA Young Friends Benefit will take place on Thursday, October 15.The Young Friends Benefit is a cornerstone of the ASPCA’s fundraising efforts to directly impact the lives of homeless, abused and neglected animals across the country. This highly publicized event attracts more than 500 passionate and upwardly mobile young professionals including philanthropists, industry leaders, newsmakers and animal lovers.The event will be hosted by Sutton Foster and Irina Shayk; guests who will walk the orange carpet with adoptables will include Lance Bass, Natalia Beber, Georgina Bloomberg, Sierra Boggess, Melissa Bolona, Lo Bosworth, Tituss Burgess, Hailey Clauson, Kimoko Glenn, Wes Gordon, Jackie Miranne, Adrienne Moore, Orfeh, Alicia Quarles, Allie Rizzo, Christian Siriano, Jessica Springsteen and many more.The event will feature dancing, a silent auction, artwork by Baron Von Fancy and music by May Kwok. Sponsors include kate spade new york, Suvretta Capital Management, UBER, Tito’s Handmade Vodka, Aviation American Gin, Dear Liza’s Custom Cookies & Desserts and Foto Fwd.Thursday, October 157:30PM: Red Carpet ArrivalsWHERE: IAC Building 555 W 18th St (between 10th Avenue and the West Side Highway) New York, NY 10011last_img read more

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Ben Vereen And RaeLynne Join Novo Nordisk Patient Ambassador Education Program

first_imgNovo Nordisk, a world leader in diabetes care, today announced new partnerships with Tony Award-winning actor and entertainer Ben Vereen and Academy of Country Music nominee RaeLynn, who both have joined its Patient Ambassador Education Program.Legendary actor, singer and dancer Ben Vereen is well known for his roles in Broadway productions including “Pippin,” “Sweet Charity,” “Fosse,” “Hair,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and “Jelly’s Last Jam,” in addition to his iconic role as ‘Chicken George’ in the television series “Roots.” Vereen, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2007, has continued to perform since his diagnosis, with appearances on popular television shows including “Hot in Cleveland,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “How I Met Your Mother” and “NCIS.” In 2014, Ben starred in the feature films “Time Out of Mind” with Richard Gere and “Top Five” with Chris Rock. Most recently, it was announced that Vereen will play Dr. Everett Scott in 20th Century Fox’s “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” scheduled to air this fall as a two-hour television event. When Ben is not performing or headlining his own one-man show, he educates others on diabetes and speaks about his personal experience living with the condition.“I am proud to work with Novo Nordisk to help empower others living with diabetes and let them know that diabetes does not have to hold you back,” said Ben Vereen. “As an entertainer, motivational speaker and an activist, I want to raise awareness of diabetes and encourage others to support one another.”Since appearing on the hit NBC television show “The Voice” in 2012, RaeLynn has climbed the country music charts with her debut, gold-certified single “God Made Girls,” garnering her multiple industry award nominations including two CMT Music Awards for Female Video of the Year and Breakthrough Video of the Year along with a 2016 nod at the Radio Disney Awards for Favorite Country Song. The dynamic entertainer has also toured with some of country music’s biggest stars including Miranda Lambert, Rascal Flatts and Blake Shelton. The singer and songwriter, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 12, is passionate about empowering others through sharing her own story. RaeLynn is grateful her condition has taught her how to live a healthy lifestyle and hopes to be an inspiration to people with diabetes everywhere.“I am so excited to partner with Novo Nordisk to show others that successful diabetes management can be integrated into daily life,” said RaeLynn. “I plan to use my role as a diabetes patient ambassador to teach people with diabetes that it shouldn’t hinder them from following their dreams. I am living proof that this can happen.”The Novo Nordisk Patient Ambassador Education Program includes influential individuals who share their personal diabetes stories in the hope of encouraging, motivating and providing support to others. They are deeply involved in the diabetes community. Both RaeLynn and Ben will actively participate in various community and educational events throughout the country on behalf of Novo Nordisk to educate and empower patients.“Novo Nordisk is dedicated to providing resources and support through the Patient Ambassador Education Program, as we believe patients and their experiences are at the center of all we do,” said Camille Lee, Senior Vice President, Diabetes Marketing, Novo Nordisk Inc. “We are thrilled that RaeLynn and Ben have joined our Patient Ambassador team and look forward to seeing the impact they will make on the diabetes community.”Novo Nordisk encourages others to share their diabetes story, as the company believes it is important to know and tell the stories of real people who use its products every day. Please visit www.ShareMyDiabetesStory.com to share your own story. For more information on how to manage your diabetes, Novo Nordisk offers Cornerstones4Care, an online resource that provides personalized support to help people reach their diabetes management goals, with access to resources, tools and information as well as individually tailored programs. Please visit www.Cornerstones4Care.com to learn more and gain free, unlimited access to the tools.last_img read more

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Davey D Releases Classic Rock Inspired MercynSin

first_imgAdvertisement Long before the recent 30 Days, 30 Songs project in which major music stars are contributing songs about Donald Trump for an online playlist, Davey released “TRUMP!” The album has an inspiring theme with songs like “Otherside” and “Stick To Your Guns.” “My parents were Italian immigrants and were afraid to take risks so my dreams of becoming a rock singer was not an option early on,” Davey says. “Otherside” is about being told that you can’t, that those dreams are for other people, not us. I listened at first and followed a more traditional path, however, now I’m going for it which, brings us to “Stick to Your Guns” as people will challenge you if you go against the grain.”Davey wasn’t the only one in the family to take that risk as his cousin Johnny Dee (De Giuli) co-founded Honeymoon Suite in 1981and the band continues to record and tour in 2016.“Trump” https://youtu.be/VcS7XvDj16EWebsite: http://www.daveydrocks.com/listen-buy-musicTwitter: @DaveyDRocksFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/daveydrocks/ Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisement Advertisement When Canadian rocker Davey D (David De Giuli) decided to give up the corporate world to become a rock singer he didn’t just want to sing, he wanted to be able to sing like his rock legend heroes Robert Plant, Steven Tyler, Brian Johnson and Axl Rose. He dedicated countless hours to studying and practicing so that he could reach those high notes and maintain that power on stage. It is no surprise then that his latest album Mercy ‘n’ Sin features a collection of originals inspired by classic rock anthems.The album was produced by multi-instrumentalist jazz musician and songwriter Mark Zubek, who has worked with Grammy winning jazz singer Betty Carter, Jack DeJohnette, Mark Turner, Tony Levin and has performed with Wynton Marsalis. “Having a huge jazz background is something that came later in life, my first love was rock radio,” says Zubek. “Davey’s music brought me back to my youth and gave me a chance to unleash the “inner rebel” who hasn’t seen the light of day in awhile! I think that’s what made us a perfect fit. I could take all of Davey’s song ideas and help finish them and bring them to light, especially because I grew up playing all those rock instruments.” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitterlast_img read more

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CTV Announces Major Expansion of Local News with AllNew Weekday Newscasts at

first_imgAdvertisement Joining the six CTV stations already delivering CTV NEWS AT FIVE (CTV Vancouver, CTV Calgary, CTV Red Deer, CTV Edmonton, CTV Lethbridge, and CTV Atlantic), editions of the newscast will be added to the following local station lineups this fall:CTV SaskatoonCTV ReginaCTV Prince AlbertCTV YorktonCTV WinnipegCTV Northern OntarioCTV KitchenerCTV OttawaCTV MontrealBeginning this summer in Toronto, both CTV Toronto and CP24 will air CP24 LIVE @ 5 and CP24 LIVE @ 5:30, while continuing to cross-simulcast CTV NEWS AT SIX, the 2017 RTDNA Award winner for Best Large Market Television Newscast and Toronto’s most-watched local newscast with total viewers and all key adult demographics.Reaching more viewers in an average week or month, and attracting the highest average audience of any news organization in the country, CTV News is definitively Canada’s most-watched and most-trusted destination for news coverage. Locally, viewers on average watch more hours of news on CTV than anywhere else. CTV’s evening newscasts are Top 5 programs in the majority of their local markets.Recognized by peers in journalism as the best of the best last month, CTV News was widely honoured at the 2017 RTDNA Awards, earning a total of 42 national and regional honours, including Best Television Newscast for both national (CTV NATIONAL NEWS WITH LISA LAFLAMME) and local broadcasts (CTV NEWS TORONTO and CTV NEWS KITCHENER). CTV News also garnered multiple honours at the 2017 Canadian Screen Awards, including Best National News Anchor (CTV NATIONAL NEWS’ Lisa LaFlamme), and Best Local News Anchor (CTV Edmonton’s Daryl McIntyre).SOCIAL MEDIA LINKS:Twitter@CTVNewsFacebookfacebook.com/CTVNewsfacebook.com/CTVInstagram:@BellMediaPR@CTV_TelevisionAbout CTV NewsCTV News is Canada’s most-watched news organization both locally and nationally, and has a network of national, international, and local news operations. CTV News operations include CTV NEWS CHANNEL, BNN – Business News Network, CP24, and information programming, including CTV NATIONAL NEWS WITH LISA LAFLAMME, CTV NATIONAL NEWS WITH SANDIE RINALDO, W5, POWER PLAY, and QUESTION PERIOD. Flagship news sites include CTVNews.ca, as well as CP24.com and BNN.ca, and are complemented by CTV News GO, CP24 GO, and BNN GO apps, and text-over-video product, ON THE GO, which provide a direct connection to Canada’s most trusted news anytime and anywhere.  With a perspective that is distinctly Canadian, CTV News brings Canadians the international and domestic news stories of the day and is the #1 news organization in Canada.About CTVCTV is Canada’s #1 private broadcaster. Featuring a wide range of quality news, sports, information, and entertainment programming, CTV has been Canada’s most-watched television network for the past 16 years in a row. CTV is a division of Bell Media, Canada’s premier multimedia company with leading assets in television, radio, digital, and Out-of-Home. Bell Media is owned by BCE Inc. (TSX, NYSE: BCE), Canada’s largest communications company. More information about CTV can be found on the network’s website at CTV.ca. TORONTO, June 7, 2017 – Further bolstering the network’s commitment to deliver Canada’s most trusted news coverage, CTV today announced a major expansion of its award-winning local programming, delivering CTV NEWS broadcasts at 5 p.m. on all local CTV stations across Canada, beginning this fall. Creating an additional 35 hours of original local production each week, the added news programming on weeknights ensures viewers can find CTV News at 5 p.m. as well as 6 p.m. in their local market.“A staple in CTV’s local lineups for generations, CTV NEWS broadcasts are fundamental to our local market strategy of delivering local news that matters to our viewers, while providing a strong lead-in to our winning primetime slate,” said Nikki Moffatt, President, Local Radio and TV and Senior Vice-President, Finance, Bell Media. “Adding locally produced, early evening weeknight newscasts in all key markets benefits our industry and partners, while strengthening the communities we are proudly committed to serve.”“Local news is an essential institution that unites communities across the country, and we are excited about our investment in more local news coverage with these daily 5 p.m. newscasts on all CTV stations,” said Wendy Freeman, President, CTV News. “If you want to know what’s going on in your city or town, there’s no substitute for local news.” Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Kristin Kreuk on weird experience of making new CBC series Burden of

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement “That’s a weird experience for me to own.” “To be around them, it feels like, ‘Oh God, your entire life I’ve been on a set,’” says Kreuk during a press tour in Cannes, where the series was being shopped internationally. Advertisement Compounding that feeling is working opposite young actresses who were her age when she started out on “Smallville.” The 35-year-old Vancouver-native has spent half her life in the spotlight. She was still a teenager when “Smallville” launched in 2001, making her an instant Comic-Con crush as Clark Kent’s girlfriend Lana Lang. After a dozen years as a CW ingenue, she finally felt like the grown-up on the set while making CBC’s “Burden of Truth,” which premieres Wednesday. CANNES, France — Viewers have watched former “Smallville” and “Beauty and the Beast” star Kristin Kreuk grow up on television. Advertisement These young actresses didn’t grow up watching “Smallville,” Kreuk points out, “because they would have been three!” Twitterlast_img read more

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Bridge leading territory to trouble auditor

first_imgAPTN National NewsA federal audit of the Northwest Territories troubled Deh Cho bridge project revealed that the territorial government failed to adequately manage key risks in the multi-million dollar project.The project has run into massive cost overruns and construction delays that could leave the territory’s tax payers on the hook.last_img

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Program helps Indigenous women be the change they want to see

first_imgAPTN National NewsValerie Moses is beaming.The 24 year-old from Six Nations has worked hard for this day.It’s her graduation from the three-month Indigenous Women in Community Leadership program at St. Francis Xavier University’s Coady Institute.For Moses, and the other graduates, it was a team effort.“It was really helpful to look to each other and see that our struggles weren’t based on our failures, but were more so something we could look at as a collective and find a solution together,” said Moses.APTN’s Ossie Michelin has more.last_img read more

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Paul First Nation elder fighting bed bug infestation inside deteriorating home

first_img(Elder Olin Rain and his daughter Connie Rain at his home on the Paul First Nation. Brandi Morin/APTN photo)Brandi MorinAPTN National NewsPAUL FIRST NATION, Alta. – Connie Rain says her father has always been a proud man.Olin Rain, 73, fathered 10 children and has 52 grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was once a traditional dancer, singer and drummer. In recent years, Olin’s health has wavered and he usually stays pretty close to his home on the Paul First Nation.But his home, built 41 years ago, is falling apart.There are holes in the walls, when it rains water leaks through the ceiling in his bedroom, a piece of flooring in the bathroom is soon to give way to the basement below. The baseboards had to be removed along with most of his furniture because of an infestation of bed bugs.The bed bugs have been there for years, said Olin.The last year in particular has been pretty bad, waking up every other day with itching and bite marks. He’s tried to get rid of them by using pesticides that his son sprays in the house and on the furniture, but they keep coming back.Olin allowed APTN National News into his home.“They’re awful,” he said, although, the past few days there’s been little signs of the bugs because they sprayed the house again last week.But that only killed the live ones, he said, and as soon as the egg batches hatch the cycle will start all over again.Olin Rain’s son has been using this pesticide inside the home to fight bed bugs.An environmental health officer recently visited the home and recommended the entire house be fumigated. However, that comes at a cost of at least $1,000, and that is money Olin, who lives on a pension, doesn’t have.His daughter Connie is unemployed, and said if she had the money she would help him. It breaks her heart to see her father living in these kinds of conditions.“It’s not a good scene,” said Connie. “We need help, now. There is an urgency.”She said she has been asking for help from the band for a while but hasn’t yet had any response.“I guess there’s no funds available in that area,” said Connie.APTN contacted the band and spoke to Russell Bird, a council member.Bird said he wasn’t aware of Olin’s plight and said the band will help him to cover the costs of fumigation. The band has recently paid to fumigate several other homes and said these types of situations are considered a priority.Paul First Nation has a mix of Cree and Stoney history located approximately 70km west of Edmonton near the eastern shore of Wabamun Lake. It has a population of over 2,000 with over 1,100 living on reserve.Connie doesn’t live in the community anymore, however, she said she feels for other people that are going through what her dad is. People living at Paul are living in third world conditions and are in dire need.“When I watch the news I think ‘ok, they’re sending money over there’. But I don’t see any red flags coming up for the First Nation communities saying there’s elders living with infestations and much needed renovations so they don’t fall through their floor here in Canada,” she said.Olin Rain’s daughter Connie Rain shows where the floor in his bathroom is damaged.Loneliness adds to the affliction, said Connie. With the bed bug infestation no one wants to come visit Olin, his grandchildren don’t come around to laugh and play outside, anymore.Nevertheless, he’s not too proud or embarrassed to admit that he needs help.“He’s in need and it’s very humbling to actually bring someone into your home to share this,” said Connie.As for a new house or renovation request, Olin will remain on the long list of others waiting until the money becomes available.bmorin@aptn.calast_img read more

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CRTC awards Indigenous radio licenses across the country

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has awarded radio licenses in Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa and Toronto to three Indigenous communications companies.Northern Native Broadcasting in British Columbia was awarded radio rights in Vancouver, Aboriginal Multi-Media Society of Alberta received licenses in Edmonton and Calgary, and First Peoples Radio Inc. was awarded a license in Ottawa and Toronto.First Peoples Radio is owned by Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN).The announcement was made Wednesday in Ottawa.“This decision comes at a crucial time, not only because it comes in the wake of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report,” said Jean-Pierre Blais, chair of the CRTC. “But also because of the many major issues that affect these communities, such as the disappearance and murder of Indigenous women, water quality on some reserves and Indigenous youth suicides.“We will closely monitor the licensees to ensure that they act in keeping with their mandate of serving and promoting Indigenous communities by dealing with the issues that affect them directly, speaking their languages and promoting their cultures.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Muskrat Falls Ecological Grief Resistance became a profound unstoppable force says researcher

first_img“We see a dramatic increase and a rise in terms of national security resources and national security language starting to focus their attention, target, and police Indigenous movements with more and more intensity,” Monaghan explains.“You have an intensification of surveillance, you have more and more resources, and of course you have a reframing of a local conflict over land, over complex histories, being reduced to national security, notions of extremism, and being really reframed as very criminal and violent threats.”Pasternak and Monaghan both point to the concept of Canada’s “critical infrastructure,” which they argue the government, police, and corporations are working together to protect from Indigenous people who don’t want pipelines, dams and other developments they say are harmful on their lands.“In different bureaucracies, institutions at the national security level of policing, they’ve patched in all kinds of relationships and partnerships with private corporations that allow private corporations, which include the kind of energy branches of large energy corporations as well as private security who are employed by these corporations, to feed in intelligence, to do their own forms of surveillance and feed in intelligence that goes into policing databanks [and] into policing intelligence resources.”“Exhausting” but worth the fight, say land protectorsBeatrice Hunter, an Inuk grandmother and land protector who was the first of four from Labrador to stand in court and say ‘no’ to the injunction, and subsequently do time at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in St. John’s, says navigating the legal system while being under the watchful eye of the RCMP has taken a toll on her.“I never thought I’d be caught up in the court system,” she says. “I was never a lawbreaker, so it’s a very tiring, exhausting process and I hope I don’t get burned out.”Watch Part 2 of Justin’s Ecological Grief. At the same time, she says, “my ancestors cry out to me all the time, telling me that this is our land. So I get strength from my ancestors.”Hunter says she has “lost hope with the provincial and federal government,” and that “it seems that corporations are running the government.”While she and others continue to resist Muskrat Falls, Cole says a strength is building among Indigenous communities across Canada, “because we all recognize shared oppression and devastation to water, and devastation to land.“There’s a collective truth that’s spreading throughout Turtle Island, and it’s that our colonial oppressors are never going to be truthful. They’re never going to try to reconcile. They’re always going to try to manipulate and make deals — and if it isn’t us as people who make these changes, they won’t happen.”Kim Campbell-McLean also faces charges related to the Muskrat Falls protests. She was among the land protectors who occupied the work site in 2016.The Inuk women’s advocate from North West River spoke at the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Inquiry hearings in Labrador in March and cited large resource development projects like Muskrat Falls as one of the barriers Indigenous women and children face to accessing traditional foods, and to becoming less dependent on violent men.“Mining. Dams. It’s destroying our food sources for Inuit women and children,” she told the Inquiry.Campbell-McLean later told APTN in reference to the Muskrat Falls occupation and the charges she faces that she would “do it all over again — and I would do it every day of my life if I had to, in order to protect that for our women and our children and our culture, and our integrity and our values as people.”Charlotte Wolfrey, an Elder from the Nunatsiavut community of Rigolet, also faces charges for resisting Muskrat Falls.She says she participated in a blockade of the Muskrat Falls site days before the occupation in October 2016 because it “was a matter of continuing our culture like it was — our continuance as a people, really.”Eldred Davis, Jim Learning and Marjorie Flowers all spent time at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary after refusing to promise a judge they would stay away from the Muskrat Falls site.She agrees with Cunsolo’s assessment of ecological grief as a driving force behind the Muskrat Falls protests, and also argues that Inuit have a unique obligation to their ancestral lands, waters and resources.When she went before a judge last year, she explained this to him.“He asked me if I understood the charges, and I told him I understood I had broken some of Canada’s 150-year-old laws. But that when you’re Indigenous there’s laws that sustained us for 6,000 and 7,000 years — the law to protect the land and water and things that sustain you.”Cunsolo says the Muskrat Falls protests hold a valuable lesson, not just to those involved.“I think that Muskrat Falls, if we step back from it and look at it and what is it’s significance in history in this area in Canada, I think one of the things that it’s teaching us is: If we really look at all the different pieces that happened and we start to tell this complex story, there are key learnings about grief and people coming together in a painful way, but also in a resilient way.”Flowers says it isn’t lost on her that the forces that threaten to take away her people’s river, traditional foods and way of life are the same ones trying to prevent her from resisting.“The government has historically and continually come into our land, into this land, without proper consultation, and taken what they wanted without giving anything back,” she says.“There’s oppression and suppression, and people are stripped of their rights and they can’t stand up unless there’s force,” she says. “And that’s what I felt like I came to; when I laid on the ground those many times, I said to hell with it — somebody has to do this. We have to take the stand because otherwise what do we have left?”APTN reached out to Nalcor Energy, Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball and RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki for this story, but none granted an on camera interview before the story went to air.jbrake@aptn.ca@justinbrakenews Justin BrakeAPTN News Sunday Marjorie Flowers doesn’t consider herself a criminal.But in July of 2017 she was arrested, put on a plane, and flown more than a thousand kilometres away from her family and community in Labrador to St. John’s, where she spent 10 days in a maximum security men’s prison.When she returned home, she spent another 30 days under house arrest.Her crime? Refusing to promise a judge she would stay away from the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project site, which she and dozens of others occupied in the fall of 2016 in a last resort effort to protect their water, traditional foods and way of life from projected methylmercury contamination.The 51-year-old Inuk mother, teacher and land protector will appear in court in June to respond to civil and criminal charges for violating an injunction granted to the crown corporation building the dam in order to keep land protectors and protestors away from the site. Flowers says she will plead not guilty to the charges.Marjorie Flowers says she’s been arrested five time for resisting Muskrat Falls, but has no choice if she wants to protect her traditional foods and way of life.Flowers’ lawyer Mark Gruchy represents about two dozen people who face charges related to the Muskrat Falls protests. Most of them are Indigenous.He says his clients feel “very morally justified in what they’re doing, and in fact felt compelled in many instances to be involved in this issue the way they were.”Gruchy says the injunction and subsequent criminalization of Indigenous people defending their land, food, and way of life were avoidable.“You have the normal operation of the justice system colliding with a very social complex issue which ought to be dealt with on a political level and never should have got here.”Indigenous people arrested and jailed for defending their lands and waters. It’s a story that plays out time and again across Canada.Experiencing ‘ecological grief’But research out of Labrador is challenging the narrative of the “angry Indigenous protestor” often spun by police, governments, corporations, and media.Ashlee Cunsolo is director of Memorial University’s Labrador Institute in Happy Valley-Goose Bay.She has researched the impacts of climate change on Inuit communities in Nunatsiavut and found that many facing a loss of access to traditional hunting grounds and cultural practices fundamental to their well-being and identity are experiencing what she calls “ecological grief”.Cunsolo describes ecological grief as “grief that’s in response to a change to a beloved homeland or environment or ecosystem.”“Being out on the land and feeling their ancestors there, and feeling those memories, and suddenly being cut off from that, not only cuts you off from the experience as an individual but cuts you from that tie of ancestral connection,” she says, describing the way Inuit in Nunatsiavut have been impacted by climate change. “So it was shaking people at a very foundational sort of psychological level, as well as an emotional level, as well as a physical level.Ashlee Cunsolo is director of Memorial University’s Labrador Institute in Happy Valley-Goose Bay.Cunsolo had just begun her new job as director of the Labrador Institute in the fall of 2016 when the Muskrat Falls protests intensified ahead of planned reservoir flooding.Inuit, Innu, and settler Labradorians united against the controversial dam, in part out of fear of losing access to traditional foods.That fear was corroborated by a peer-reviewed scientific study led by Harvard researchers that projected downstream communities would be exposed to unsafe levels of methylmercury through traditional foods like fish and seal unless vegetation and topsoil were removed from the dam’s reservoir prior to flooding.Cunsolo says the way people transformed their grief into action was unlike anything she had previously seen.“Feelings of anger or frustration weren’t at the fore; it was people wanting to come together to talk about the river, and to share stories about the river,” she recalls.“It wasn’t fighting against, it was fighting for, and feeling that commitment to all the people who had come before you and had loved that river, and wanting that love to continue forward, and that access to the river to continue forward.”There are known and acceptable ways to grieve and mourn the loss of a loved one, Cunsolo explains. But when humans face the loss of lands and other non-human entities that they have a deep spiritual connection with, there are no universal ways to grieve.“But when people come together to share in grief, and to share in strength related to that grief, that is a moving, profound, unstoppable force,” she says.Cunsolo noticed that after land protectors breached a gate at the Muskrat Falls site on Oct. 22, 2016, and subsequently occupied the site, the corporation and police attempted to frame the protest as violent and to suggest the safety of workers on site had been compromised.“I think we saw this amazing thing play out in Muskrat Falls where people were almost trying to force a framing on it that was just assumed because it was a quote-unquote protest,” she says.“I don’t think that we necessarily know how to deal with [ecological grief] — in media, in court injunctions, in the legal system, in mitigation and adaptation strategies, in policy.”The peaceful occupation of Muskrat Falls continued for four days until Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball held a marathon meeting with Indigenous leaders and reached an agreement that included demands set out by land protectors.Policing Indigenous protestsWith the exception of nine arrests at a blockade days prior to the occupation, there was no major police intervention in the land protectors’ occupation of the site and no violent arrests of Indigenous people.But Flowers and others involved in the Muskrat Falls resistance say that since the occupation they’ve been followed, pulled over and approached by RCMP officers in Labrador.Denise Cole, who has been protesting Muskrat Falls since before the project’s inception, was charged with violating Nalcor’s injunction after she performed ceremony near the river.“This idea that rule of law, colonial law, has to be enforced at all cost — that’s sent a level of fear and trauma and knowing that your voice is not an important voice in the justice system at all.”Flowers says the repression she says she and others feel from the injunction and the RCMP’s enforcement of it makes them feel like they “couldn’t even breathe.“I felt like I was losing my breath, because of the power from the outside, from the colonialism—the government, the corporation itself, the law enforcers. Everything was onside.“It makes me want to scream my head off. The oppression is just so present. And there’s nothing—not a thing—I can do about it. I feel like we’re just kind of like these plastic bottles on these big waves in the ocean. We don’t have any control. We just get bounced around, into court, back out of court.”She says she sees local law enforcement as “puppets that have to do their work,” but at the same time, they’ve caused her a lot of stress.“It was starting to affect my work. It was affecting my relationship. It was affecting everything. I was feeling a lot of anxiety from it because I felt like I couldn’t go outside my house. I couldn’t go to the dental office — there was a cop behind me [while I was] making an appointment.”Shiri Pasternak, an Assistant Professor of Criminology at Ryerson University, says what’s happening to land protectors in Labrador is playing out with other resource development projects on Indigenous lands across Canada, where corporations are increasingly turning to courts for injunctions when Indigenous land and water protectors threaten corporate profits.“In order to justify, in order to authorize the RCMP and police forces to enforce [Canada’s] and these companies’ access to Indigenous lands, they need to secure legal authority, and they do that through the injunction,” she explains.She says the RCMP and other police forces often surveil, follow or approach Indigenous people who defend their land — tactics collectively referred to as “soft policing”.“Rather than looking like violent repression they work in more covert and subtle ways in terms of letting people know they’re being watched in the hopes that people will self-police not to get involved in things because they’re intimidated.”Jeffrey Monaghan, an Assistant Professor of Criminology at Carleton University, recently co-authored a new book with his colleague Andy Crosby called “Policing Indigenous Movements.”In it, the authors disclose RCMP documents obtained through access to information legislation that shows the national police force operating in what Monaghan calls a “conservative culture” in how they understand and treat Indigenous land and water protectors.Those documents show RCMP referring to Indigenous people resisting Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline in British Columbia as “violent extremists,” and the entire Mi’kmaq-led movement to stop shale gas exploration in New Brunswick as a “violent extremist anti-fracking movement.”Watch Part 1 of Justin’s story on Ecological Grief.last_img read more

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Metis Pavilion back at Folklorama in Winnipeg

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsFor the first time in eight years, the Metis Pavilion is back at Folklorama in Winnipeg bringing with it the famous dance troupe – the Asham Stompers.Folklorama Festival celebrates culture and diversity in Winnipeg.And for two young dancers, a nearby disaster almost prevented them from participating.bhobson@aptn.ca@bhobs22last_img

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Nisgaa and Gitanyow dispute fishing rights on northern BC river

first_imgLee WilsonAPTN NewsA fishing site on the Nass River in northern British Columbia is the centre of a battle over territory, tradition and rights.The Gitanyow Hereditary Chiefs say they have the right to fish there. But the Nisga’a Lisims Government say the Gitanyow are trespassing, and that they want their neighbours out.On July 26 the Gitanyow, who are part of the Gitxsan Nation, received a notice of trespass from the RCMP.The complaint originated with the Nisga’a Lisims Government, and the Gitanyow were given 24 hours to vacate the Nass River fishing site.But Gitanyow say they’re not leaving.The Nisga’a say their modern treaty negotiated with the government in 2000 is evidence the land and fishing rights belongs to them.“The Nisgaa nation has owned and occupied Nisgaa lands including the Nass River since the time immemorial. We have 26,000 square KMs of traditional land the Nisga’a have used,” according to Nisga’a Lisims Government President Eva Clayton.“The Nisga’a Nation unequivocally rejects identifying the Gitanyow trespass as a territorial dispute.”According to Chief Malii, President of Gitanyow Hereditary Chiefs, the government “created the problem” of competing claims to the land.Gitanyow elders also say their people have used the land for generations.Both sides are looking for clarity from the provincial government.lwilson@aptn.calast_img read more

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Encana reports US103B fourth quarter profit production up from year ago

first_imgRevenue for the quarter totalled $2.38 billion, up from $1.21 billion.Total production in the fourth quarter of 2018 was 403,400 barrels of oil equivalent per day, up from 335,200 a year ago.In its outlook for 2019, Encana says its capital budget for the year will be the range of $2.7 billion to $2.9 billion. CALGARY, A.B. – Encana Corp. reported a fourth-quarter profit of US$1.03 billion compared with a loss a year ago as production increased 20 percent.The Calgary-based energy company, which keeps its books in U.S. dollars, says the profit amounted to $1.08 per share for the quarter ended Dec. 31. That compared with a loss of $229 million or 24 cents per share in the last three months of 2017.Operating earnings for the quarter amounted to $305 million or 32 cents per share, up from an operating profit of $114 million or 12 cents per share a year earlier.last_img read more

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