Leicester side to take on Gloucester

first_img Andy Forsyth out injuredBilly Twelvetrees, Martin Castrogiovanni, George Skivington and Ben Woods return to the Leicester Tigers team for Saturday’s Aviva Premiership Rugby trip to Gloucester.Andy Forsyth and Geoff Parling are ruled out after picking up injuries in the European win over Ulster last weekend, meaning a timely return from injury for Twelvetrees and a starting place for Skivington. Woods starts at openside flanker as Julian Salvi is also ruled out, and Castrogiovanni is given a starting role in the front row with Dan Cole among the replacements.“This is a big month of fixtures with Gloucester and Northampton, and then the European double-header with Clermont Auvergne,” said director of rugby Richard Cockerill.“Gloucester have a good forward pack and a dangerous set of backs, and Kingsholm is always a tough place to go. “But we put in a good all-round performance against Ulster last weekend, our defence was good throughout and we got the basics of the game right and came through in the end. Our recent form has been pretty good and we obviously want that to continue.”Saturday’s match is covered live by ESPN. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Starting XV:15 Geordan Murphy (c)14 Horacio Agulla13 Matt Smith12 Billy Twelvetrees11 Alesana Tuilagi10 Toby Flood9 Sam Harrison1 Marcos Ayerza2 George Chuter3 Martin Castrogiovanni4 Louis Deacon5 George Skivington6 Tom Croft7 Ben Woods8 Thomas WaldromReplacements16 Rob Hawkins17 Boris Stankovich18 Dan Cole19 Steve Mafi20 Ed Slater21 Ben Youngs22 Jeremy Staunton23 Scott Hamilton LEICESTER, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 04: Andy Forsyth of Tigers looks on during the LV Anglo Welsh Cup match between Leicester Tigers and Bath at Welford Road on February 4, 2011 in Leicester, England. (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)last_img read more

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South Africa unchanged for All Blacks test

first_imgSouth Africa’s Bryan Habana scores a try against Australia during the Test match between Australia and South Africa at Loftus Versfeld stadium in Pretoria on September 29, 2012. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER JOE (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER JOE/AFP/GettyImages) SOUTH AFRICA: Zane Kirchner; Bryan Habana, Jaco Taute, Jean de Villiers (captain), Francois Hougaard; Johan Goosen, Ruan Pienaar; Tendai Mtawarira, Adriaan Strauss, Jannie du Plessis, Eben Etzebeth, Andries Bekker, Francois Louw, Willem Alberts, Duane Vermeulen.Replacements: Tiaan Liebenberg, Coenie Oosthuizen, Flip Van Der Merwe, Marcell Coetzee, Elton Jantjies, Juan de Jongh, Pat Lambie Bath flanker Francois Louw starts again in the number 6 shirt, with Ulster’s Ruan Pienaar picked at scrum-half. Jean de Villiers captains the side.South Africa v New ZealandSaturday, 6th October 2012 at FNB Stadium, SowetoKick-off: 16:00 BST live on Sky Sports 3 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Flying form: Bryan Habana scored a hat-trick against Australia last weekendHEYNEKE MEYER has selected the same side that defeated Australia last weekend in Pretoria to face New Zealand in Soweto this Saturday.The Springboks ran in five tries against the Wallabies, with winger Bryan Habana scoring a hat-trick in a comfortable victory. The three scores increased Habana’s number of tries for South Africa to 46 in 82 games.20-year old fly Johan Goosen made his first start last weekend and retains the number 10 shirt to face the All Blacks after his impressive performance, holding off the challenge of Morné Steyn, Pat Lambie and Elton Jantjies.Coenie Oosthuizen is cleared to play after experiencing some muscle stiffnes, and replaces Pat Cilliers on the bench.last_img read more

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Lions 2013: Australia squad named on Sunday

first_imgThe Lions have to expect that strong Australian players have come on even more, as well as accepting that they cannot predict the strength of any new players. This means there cannot be an assumption of weakness.After all, Australia can raise their game for these landmark Tests just as every host does. Come Sunday, those pumped up players will be ready to go. SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – MAY 01: Australian Wallabies coach Robbie Deans speaks to the media during an ARU press conference at Allianz Stadium on May 1, 2013 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images) Thankfully for the selectors, James Horwill and Will Genia can clamp down as senior figures, ensuring that any uncertainty is an irrelevance. After all, confidence appears to be high in Australia following the Lions squad announcement and there is enough brilliance on show during the Super 15 weekends to make them optimistic.Propped up: Benn Robinson has had a good season so farThe breakaways will be what worry the Lions. Scott Higginbotham has had a fine season and Ben Mowen may be knocking on the door. A lot of talk has burst out about returning hero George Smith and young Liam Gill and Michael Hooper have more fondness for stealing than Winona Ryder in a street market.With the Lions, though, it comes down to what the perception of any Aussie squad is and what the reality is that Gatland highlights. It is a tired cliché to say Australians cannot scrummage, but there will be no let-up at the Lions end. Benn Robinson and Ben Alexander will definitely be selected, as will Stephen Moore and Tatafu Polota-Nau. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fixed smile: Robbie Deans has quite a few selection posers to mull over in the next few days before naming his squadBy Alan DymockON SUNDAY the Australian public will know the initial 25-man squad for the Test series against the British and Irish Lions.Understandably the timbre of some hollering Wallaby fans may weaken in the days building up, their voices wobbling thanks to unfolding events down under. First they held a bafflingly titled “logistics camp” last month where a squad of 30 prospective Test players reportedly talked tactics. Quade Cooper was omitted from proceedings and it has now been said that the free-spirited Red will be watched during Queensland’s game against the Lions. If this is true then it does not bode well for the maverick’s inclusion come Sunday.However, theories about this were all poured out before Kurtley Beale swallowed his pride and nominated himself for rehab, manfully accepting his own failings and removing himself from active footie so that he could seek help.Bromance over?: James O’Connor and Kurtley BealeIt provides Robbie Deans with some difficult quandaries before he makes his squad public. Quade is going nowhere. Without him? Promising and supremely talented playmaker James O’Connor will potentially be free from the other ‘Three Amigos’, meaning there is a chance he could step up against the Lions and play like the Northern Hemisphere fear he can. However, the question of where else he could slot in makes things difficult for the Wallaby selectors.With O’Connor at 10 there could be no need to blood Brumbie Christian Lealiifano, but then Berrick Barnes may be used. At centre, O’Connor would have to build up a quick rapport with whichever full-back comes in Beale’s stead (provided he would have been a full-back rather than a stand-off). Now Deans has to call up Jesse Mogg of the Brumbies or Izzy Folau for their first camp. Some would swoon with expectation, but it hints at an adventure that belies the last few international windows that Deans has overseen. Suddenly there is chatter about reinstating the likes of Pat McCabe or Rob Horne in the hope that there is a steady, reliable, painted-by-numbers centre to compliment the bustling talents that force Deans’ hand.last_img read more

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Bledisloe Cup: No surprises or weak links in All Blacks selection

first_imgNo points to prove: Hansen will always put out a strong teamCrotty may not have Cruden’s brain or a bag of tricks with the same dimensions, but he should be afforded the leeway that Cruden never got. The business of international rugby is hard enough and at least for the Bledisloe, Crotty has the ability to contend with Wallabies like Adam Ashley-Cooper with an hour of play under his drawstring. If he is used.The fact remains that this is a battle-hardened and purposeful All Blacks side that could be parachuted into any hotspot, on any terrain, and be expected to win. Steven Luatua is a replacement for Liam Messam, but no one is screaming in horror over this. Crotty may not even get his debut if the game is close, but an All Black ‘weakness’ is normally of a better ilk than any other international replacement.The fear must be, then, that the All Blacks do not thump this new-era Australia and maybe we just want easy excuses  lined up in the face of such a predictable All Black selection. Getting to grips: There has been much talk about Ryan Crotty coming in to the All Blacks squad, but he may not playBy Alan DymockTHE SUPER Rugby semi-final in Hamilton. An hour gone. Ryan Crotty fires out a loose pass to one of his Crusaders team-mates but before it can touch a fingertip a sprinting Aaron Cruden snatches the ball and bursts towards an interception try. It was a close game that the Waikato Chiefs won through their ability force their way through for scores and the Crusaders never quite looked strong enough to get to the final.Out of the shadows: No one writes off Aaron Cruden nowWhy is this Crotty-Cruden incident worth noting? Well, as the All Blacks name a team to contend the Bledisloe Cup in Australia – a team with almost no surprises – there has been some reaction to the selection of these two men. Chiefly, people are delighted that Cruden steps in but wary of the potential Crotty debut.The Crusaders centre was a late call-up to the All Black squad after Francis Saili went down and with Dan Carter pulling out and Cruden being promoted to starting fly-half, Crotty was gifted the empty spot on the bench. He is considered a paint-by-numbers guy and his rough-woven beard makes him look like the hipster who started turning up at your gym. In short: he is not the impossibly-skilled ringmaster most All Black fans want in their midfield and some feel that another hard worker is simply not what they need.He is skilled and he is a facilitator. If Steve Hansen deems him good enough, surely he should be given a chance? Of course, with no other headlines and the All Blacks picking an almost predictable, experienced team there has to be something to pick through.We have been through all of this before, of course, with Cruden himself. It took the fly-half time to convince the Kiwi public he had the mental aptitude to succeed once he had stepped out of Dan Carter’s shadow. Bossing games since his shaky time at the 2011 Rugby World Cup, though, he has become a figure of confidence and a game leader. That is not to say that he shouts and screams in the dressing room or grabs the likes of Kieran Read by the collar, but now people would not sound odd if they suggested that the kid is calm enough for international rugby. All Blacks team v Australia: Israel Dagg; Ben Smith, Conrad Smith, Ma’a Nonu, Julian Savea; Aaron Cruden, Aaron Smith; Kieran Read, Richie McCaw (c), Steven Luatua; Sam Whitelock, Luke Romano; Owen Franks, Andrew Hore, Tony Woodcock.Subs: Keven Mealamu, Ben Franks, Charlie Faumuina, Brodie Retallick, Sam Cane, Tawera Kerr-Barlow, Beauden Barrett, Ryan Crotty. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS during a New Zealand All Blacks training session at Rugby League Park on August 13, 2013 in Wellington, New Zealand. last_img read more

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Summer Test: New Zealand 39-21 Wales

first_imgAttendance: 46,270For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. New Zealand recovered from an 18-15 half-time deficit against Wales to continue their unbeaten run at Eden Park, which dates back to 1994. It was an impressive first half from Wales, who produced a far more dangerous attacking game than witnessed during the Six Nations that resulted in tries for Taulupe Faletau and Rhys Webb. Yet, the All Blacks, making an uncharacteristic number of errors, still scored two themselves in the opening 40 minutes, Julian Savea and Waisake Naholo crossing.The world champions reduced those errors in the second half and upped their offload game while Wales seemed to retreat into their shells a little, failing to make the same yardage that they did in the first half. A second try for Naholo and one for Kieran Read put the game out of Wales’ reach before replacement hooker Nathan Harris added a little gloss to the scoreline with a try in the last minute.WHAT’S HOTFabulous full-backs – The two men with the number ‘15’ on their backs at Eden Park were outstanding. Catching the ball deep, they both made huge yardage up the field – and created a try apiece in the first half. Ben Smith caught a misjudged Dan Biggar kick, strode through the defence and passed wide to Aaron Cruden, who released Waisake Naholo on the inside to score. Fifteen minutes later, Liam Williams scythed past the two All Black locks, drew Smith and put Rhys Webb away for a try. Brilliant runners with ball in hand, they proved too slippery for many defenders to grasp and were pretty solid defensively too. Williams even earned praise from the New Zealand TV pundits – a tough crowd to please!Running man: Liam Williams impressed from full-back. Photo: Getty ImagesNew Zealand’s production line – For all the talk of the world champions being a team in transition, with the likes of Richie McCaw, Dan Carter, Conrad Smith and Ma’a Nonu retiring post-World Cup, the All Blacks team is still packed with experience. Carter’s No 10 shirt has been filled by Aaron Cruden, a man who’s played in a World Cup final himself, while Sam Cane, who has captained the All Blacks, slots in at openside instead of McCaw.Yes, you can’t replace players of the calibre of Carter and McCaw – important as much for their aura as their rugby ability – but the guys coming in still have plenty of experience and talent. New Zealand must be applauded for the endless stream of class rugby players they produce.Double time: Waisake Naholo bursts through the Wales defence. Photo: Getty ImagesAttacking verve – The All Blacks are renowned for it and there were plenty of glimpses here – Waisake Naholo’s sudden change of pace fooling Wales’ defence, Aaron Cruden’s deft chips finding team-mates in space, Brodie Retallick’s offloads keeping the ball alive. It was just the number of errors that disrupted their momentum at times.What was more surprising was the adventure shown by Wales with ball in hand. They still kicked plenty of ball but there was purpose to it, trying to get players in behind the New Zealand defensive line, and there was more of a willingness to run it from deep and spread the ball wide. Liam Williams and George North both continually troubled defenders, ducking and stepping round tackles, while Jamie Roberts was putting in long passes as well as breaking the gain-line. Warren Gatland has talked about being “brave and bold” – and Wales certainly showed that at times.Ardie Savea’s hair – The flanker, who made his Test debut against Wales, has taken the ‘high and tight’ look favoured by players like Danny Care to another level. It’s a big call but it could well be the best haircut in rugby!Hair raising: Ardie Savea’s haircut stands out in this team shot. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S NOT Opening act: Julian Savea scores the first of New Zealand’s five tries against Wales. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Error count – This was New Zealand’s first game since the World Cup final last October, and it showed. There were probably more knock-ons by All Blacks in the first 40 minutes than there were in the whole of their RWC 2015 campaign. They were lethal when they got quick ball and spread it wide, but too often there were dropped balls, knock-ons or other mistakes that disrupted their flow. They made twice as many handling errors as Wales in this game and had their own ball disrupted at the breakdown by Wales – don’t expect them to look so rusty in Wellington next week.Arrowhead: Kieran Read and the All Blacks perform the haka before kick-off. Photo: Getty ImagesWhite-line fever – At the end of the first half, Wales had a five-metre scrum under the posts. When the ball came out Rhys Webb fed Jonathan Davies, who was brought down a metre from the line. Then Taulupe Faletau had a go – one metre out again. Wales continued to pummel the line but couldn’t get over it, when perhaps moving it wide would have been the better option. They needed to give the All Blacks a bigger half-time deficit to recover from than three points.Inorganic chants – It was rather strange to see the words ‘All Blacks’ flashed up on the big screen at Eden Park to encourage the crowd to chant for their team. Surely the chants and songs we here at games should be an organic process? Not generated by offering instructions over screens or tannoys. Let fans create their own atmosphere.On the line: Rhys Webb is congratulated on his try by Sam Warburton. Photo: Getty ImagesNEW ZEALAND: B Smith; W Naholo, M Fekitoa (S Tamanivalu 75), R Crotty, J Savea (B Barrett 43); A Cruden, A Smith (TJ Perenara 70); J Moody (W Crockett 48), D Coles (N Harris 71), O Franks (C Faumuina 46), L Romano (P Tuipulotu 53), B Retallick, J Kaino, S Cane (A Savea 61), K Read (capt).Tries: Savea, Naholo 2, Read, Harris. Cons: Cruden 4. Pens: Cruden 2.WALES: L Williams (G Anscombe 65); G North, J Davies, J Roberts (S Williams 65), H Amos; D Biggar, R Webb (G Davies 72); G Jenkins (R Evans 65), K Owens (S Baldwin 65), S Lee (T Francis 72), B Davies (J Ball 72), AW Jones (J Ball 45-51), R Moriarty, S Warburton (capt, E Jenkins 72), T Faletau.Tries: Faletau, Webb. Con: Biggar. Pens: Biggar 3. What’s hot and what’s not from the All Blacks’ win over Wales at Eden Parklast_img read more

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Cardiff Blues and Wales playmaker Gareth Anscombe

first_img Who are the jokers at Cardiff Blues?Well, Dan Fish doesn’t shut up. It took me a month to understand him with his thick Cardiff accent and his lisp. I know Willis (Halaholo) and Rey (Lee-Lo) also struggled to keep up with him. He’s a bit of a character. When Fishy and Lewis Jones get going they’re like Beavis and Butt-Head.Any practical jokes you can share?I got into a prank war with Tom James, which wasn’t a good idea. It started with me ‘apparently’ taking his car parking spot, which I didn’t think was his, and escalated with us going through each other’s bags. It ended with him pinching my car keys and driving my car out into the fields with no petrol. I couldn’t find it and they were pretty decent wheels. Finally, the boys told me where it was!Prankster: Tom James engaged Gareth Anscombe in a succession of practical jokes. Photo: Getty ImagesWhat makes you laugh online?I like the Facebook memes, the witty one-liners you see. Most of the boys tag each other so we’re insulting each other on a daily basis.What are your nicknames and why?My nickname is Chicken. I was hoping when I came here I’d have flicked it but thanks to Jarrad Hoeata it travelled over from New Zealand with me!It’s down to the size of the pins I have. I’ve been working hard in the gym to build them up but I reckon it’s all those fast-twitch fibres I have. I’m not too worried, as long as I can run around on them.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREAny funny nicknames in the Blues squad?Macauley Cook has so many nicknames. Many we can’t mention for fear of court cases but it’s usually Spudsy. His dress sense doesn’t help – he wears some outrageous stuff. Along with the big ginger locks and beard, he’s a big target.Do you have any phobias?Snakes creep me out. I’ve had to do a few media shoots with them and it’s been pretty hard work. Not pleasant at all.What annoys you?As I’m getting older I’m becoming bothered by untidiness. Now I’ve got my own house, my partner has noticed that I’m getting a bit OCD if things aren’t tidied up in a certain way. Perhaps it’s because I’m a fly-half, I want that control. Jarrad Hoeata, who’s extremely messy, used to sit next to me in the locker room and take up three spaces. We used tape to mark out our territory.Rain man: Jarrad Hoeata is now back playing rugby in New Zealand. Photo: Getty ImagesWhich person would you least like to be stuck in a lift with? Dive time: Gareth Anscombe scores for Cardiff Blues. Photo: Getty Images I’m halfway through a Bachelor of Business degree. I’m doing lots of online learning. Apart from taking a stake in a business, I’d still like to keep my hand in with rugby when I retire. That’s a little way off, hopefully.This article first appeared in the October 2017 issue of Rugby World. New Zealand-born Cardiff Blue Gareth Anscombe talks coffee, cricket and chicken legs LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS There’s hardly anyone I really dislike but there’s this character in Game of Thrones, Joffrey. I absolutely hated him. He was such an unpleasant individual.What’s been your most embarrassing moment?I was captain in my last year at school and was leading the team onto the field. There was a rope for supporters, one of those awkward ones where you don’t know whether to go under or over it.I went for the latter and fell flat on my face in front of hundreds of people and the lads – the only saving grace is that no one caught it on camera! It damaged the teenage ego, alright.If you could have three dinner party guests, who would they be?The late Michael Jackson, as he was a musical genius. The late Muhammad Ali, simply the GOAT (greatest of all time). And Kim Kardashian. That would be an interesting party!Centre stage: Michael Jackson in one of his iconic stage outfits. Photo: Getty ImagesDo you have any hidden talents?That’s a tough one. I suppose I was a reasonable cricketer. I made an Auckland representative side and batted around five. I had a couple of tons and my best bowling figures were 5 for 12.What’s your guilty pleasure? McDonald’s. I’m a big fan. Whenever I go past the drive-thru, I find it drawing me in. When I’ve had a rubbish week or I’m feeling a bit low, I’ll sneak in there.What do you miss about New Zealand?The standard of coffee and the independent cafés. Here you get a lot of chains and the coffee is pretty average. I’ve looked at investing in a coffee shop. Something to consider for the future.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? TAGS: Cardiff Blues last_img read more

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Scotland face disciplinary hearing over comments at Rugby World Cup

first_img Scotland face disciplinary hearing over comments at Rugby World CupComments made by the Scottish Rugby Union’s CEO Mark Dodson in the build-up to their vital match with Japan have landed the Scots in hot water, with Rugby World Cup sending them in front of an Independent Disputes Committee for misconduct.When their final World Cup pool game against Japan last Sunday was threatened with cancellation due to Typhoon Hagibis, Scotland faced exiting the tournament without playing a decider. The CEO went on Radio 4, saying of World Rugby’s plan to declare any cancelled game a 0-0 draw: “We’re not going to let Scotland be the collateral damage for a decision that was taken in haste.”Related: A war of words on the eve of Typhoon Hagibis hittingDodson later clarified in a press conference that the union had sought legal advice on whether there could be flexibility in the World Cup agreement for re-scheduling a game. He also repeated his view that: “I think in the court of public opinion, we’ve already won. I think you can see from social media, that people feel that this doesn’t feel quite right.”Making his point: Tournament chief Alan Gilpin (Getty Images)Today, tournament director Alan Gilpin revealed to the media that the SRU’s recent conduct merited scrutiny by an independent panel. He said: “We’ve referred to the independent disputes committee the comments and behaviours of the Scottish Rugby Union. On that basis it’s probably inappropriate to comment any further.” So, looks like the Scottish Rugby Union will be in front of an Independent Disputes Committee for their words/actions over the last week of the RWC. A bit of ‘bringing the game into disrepute’. Should all become clearer in coming days— Alan Dymock (@AlanDymock) October 15, 2019 Tournament organisers have issued misconduct charges against the SRU Flying the flag: A Scotland fan in Yokohama (Getty Images) A later statement from Rugby World Cup read: “Rugby World Cup can confirm that it has issued misconduct charges against the Scottish Rugby Union in relation comments made about Typhoon Hagibis and its potential impact on the Rugby World Cup 2019 Pool A match between Japan versus Scotland.Related: Inside the vital 24 hours before Japan v Scotland“The case will be decided by an Independent Disputes Committee and Rugby World Cup will not make any further comment on this matter pending the outcome.”On Wednesday, the SRU released an official reaction statement in which they said: “Following receipt of correspondence yesterday from World Rugby, Scottish Rugby confirms that it has received a notice of complaint from Rugby World Cup Ltd. Scottish Rugby is querying whether the matter is an appropriate one for the bringing of Misconduct charges.“If Misconduct proceedings are to proceed, Scottish Rugby looks forward to receiving a fair hearing in this matter. No further comment would be appropriate at this time.”It is believed a hearing will be held before the World Cup concludes.Keep track of all the news from Japan via our Rugby World Cup home page. Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Social media’s power to share good news

first_img October 28, 2012 at 7:02 pm THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! I am working so hard to show our church that this is not a media to be feared, but one to be embraced. We have so much good to share as both Episcopalians and as Christians. Why wouldn’t we embrace new technologies to spread the Word farther? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Beth Dunn says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Drew Dorgan says: Fr Michael Fuller says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Social Media October 27, 2012 at 10:52 am The world has embraced social media. Why is the church so afraid of so doing? [Episcopal News Service – Albuquerque, New Mexico] The Diocese of the Rio Grande invited me here to do a workshop on social media at their just concluded 60th convention. I showed up prepared to do that and a sermon about the power of social media broke out.I started with a prayer for church communicators created by my friend the Rev. Jan Nunley.“God who wrote your words:on tablets of stone with fingers of fire.God who gave your word:the chief cornerstone with hands of flesh.Help us who write:with fingers of flesh through sparks of fireto break open hearts of stone.”We’re all communicators of the gospel but social media raises our presence—and influence—to extraordinary new levels.  We can reach more people throughout the world in less time than ever before in human history.  Social media has proven power that we would do well to use. Consider this: If Twitter can help bring down governments, it can help us build up the Kingdom of God.The Rev. Dan Webster during a social media workshop at the Diocese of Rio Grande Convention. Photo/Brian WinterMy gospel lesson whenever I talk about church communications is from Matthew 5:14-16, “You are the light of the world. A city built on a hill cannot be hidden. No one after lighting a lamp puts it under the bushel basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father in heaven.”For me our charge doesn’t get much clearer than that.  We must let people know when we welcome the stranger, feed the hungry, clothe the naked, house the homeless, visit the sick and dying.  We must tell people why we do these things and that it is what happens when the Kingdom of God comes very near them. Social media allows us to communicate all this and more in real time.Of course there are always folks who point out the shortcomings of social media and say, “I don’t want to know what someone had for breakfast,” or “I don’t care where someone is right now.” But in one of my workshops an attendee talked about one congregation where members were encouraged to post on their mobile devices how they were at the church.  That’s certainly one way of witnessing to the gospel.As God would have it, the workshops were on the feast day of St. Luke.  It also was the day Newsweek magazine announced it would end its print publication by year’s end.  Talk about a blessed “Godincidence.”  Newsweek’s announcement begged the question about print publications vs. electronic.  I think we have to do both.  We have church members who are not online but are longtime members who need to be kept informed.And just as Luke, Mark, Matthew,  and John used the tools then available to share the gospel, so must we, 20 centuries later .It has long been clear to me that communications is a ministry.  I’ve long believed there should be a budget line for communications in every parish and every diocese with professionally trained paid or volunteer staff folk recognized as ministers of communication.When it comes to social media, I’m not an expert by any means, but I’ve become a fan.  I’ve come to see how digital technology and social media tools Facebook and Twitter allow us to share the gospel and our liturgy to more than those who worship in church buildings.Each one of us can let our light shine. We now live in a time when we can shine that light farther than ever.  What’s stopping us?— The Rev. Dan Webster is canon for evangelism and ministry development in the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland. He serves on General Convention’s Standing Commission on Communications and Information Technology.  He tweets @RevWeb. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Mary Catherine Day says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Social media’s power to share good news Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA November 9, 2012 at 11:40 pm Really happy to read this post! I’ve worked with a handful of parishes over the last yeat as a volunteer consultant, helping them get the ball rolling on the social media train, and I’ve wondered if there were others in the church toiling away in similar fashion. Would love to connect with others somehow, get better at what we do, learn how to make successful communicators out of parishes that are sometimes eager, sometimes hesitant, but who always have a great deal to share! New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (4) October 31, 2012 at 11:47 pm Great article. Let our Episcopal light shine! By Dan WebsterPosted Oct 23, 2012 last_img read more

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Presiding Bishop’s remarks to structure task force

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] On February 14, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori made the following remarks at the first meeting of the Task Force on Structure created by General Convention Resolution 2012-C095:Structure Task Force14 February 2013Maritime Center, Linthicum Heights, MDThe Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchAs this body begins its work together, I want to offer a broad sketch of who and what this Church is today. I am deeply aware that many Episcopalians have a good understanding of their local congregations, but often lack the broader awareness of who and what we are. I’m also going to suggest a handful of broad areas of developmental work that I see us as a church beginning to engage. Your task is to bring all of your creativity, strategizing, thought and prayer to the work of suggesting how we might better support and undergird and challenge the life and work of this Church and to do it with as one person says, sheer holy boldness.The Episcopal Church is 2 million people in 109 dioceses and three other jurisdictions (the Area Mission of Navajoland, Convocation of Churches in Europe, and Micronesia).We are present in 16 countries: Taiwan, Micronesia, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Haiti, Dominican Republic, British and US Virgin Islands, United States including Puerto Rico, Honduras, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and Switzerland. And these United States. There are conversations going on in Poland with people who want to affiliate with The Episcopal Church. We also have a unique relationship with the Diocese of Cuba, which was part of The Episcopal Church until the United States and Cuban governments forced an end to their membership in The Episcopal Church in the 1960s.Ninety percent of our members and our dioceses are in the United States, but we are not a “national church” and haven’t been for nearly two centuries, since we began to live into our formal legal identity, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS).We speak and worship in a variety of languages, not only in the extra-US dioceses. Even those who usually worship in one or more local languages and sometimes also in English. Within the United States context, most dioceses have worshipping communities that represent more than one cultural context, history, and/or language. The Diocese of Los Angeles offers worship in at least 19 languages every week.Our diocesan structures range from the historic and numerically large (in terms of congregations and people), like New York, Massachusetts, and Virginia, to the numerically small but geographically large western dioceses (e.g., Montana, Navajoland, Alaska, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah). Micronesia is the smallest jurisdiction, consisting of four congregations and a large boarding school, in two different island jurisdictions.Five of our dioceses are in various stages of renewal following the departure of leadership in recent years: San Joaquin, Fort Worth, Pittsburgh, Quincy, and South Carolina. In each case, the remaining Episcopalians have found resurrection in turning outward to serve their communities, and moving away from an inward focus on conflict.We are an enormously varied church, with strong growth in most of our overseas dioceses and in immigrant congregations in the United States context. Latino/Hispanic congregations are an increasingly significant part of the whole, as are Asian congregations of many sorts. These congregations are no longer all primarily first generation immigrants, and dioceses are beginning to learn how to address the changing demographic needs. We also have an increasing number of African immigrant congregations – Liberian, Sudanese, Nigerian, and others. We are also growing in more traditional congregations, particularly when they are focused on mission, and moving out into the communities around them.ChallengesAs The Episcopal Church moves into the 21st century and considers where and how the gospel needs to be proclaimed in the midst of changing societies, we have several primary foci of attention, the places where people are paying attention.1) Identity. This is central – who are we, what are we for?Far more attention is being paid to these questions, and how we form our members of all ages in an Episcopal ethos for Christian living. [You might work toward a similar statement!]We are baptized members of the body of Christ, formed and sent to be agents of God’s dream of reconciliation in a broken world.2) Mission. This is a primary response to the question of identity (I remind you of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society)In recent triennia, we have begun to explore the mission focus in broad ways that have engaged the imagination of the wider church. Beginning with the Millennium Development Goals (growing out of the global Jubilee movement in 2000), we have worked hard at serving “the least of these.” The MDGs center on the poorest of the poor in the developing world, they address hunger, maternal and children’s health, women’s empowerment, primary education, major disease threats, economically and ecologically sustainable development, and trade and debt practices. The MDGs will be refocused and renewed in 2015, and the good news is that we’ve made significant progress in several areas.One of the challenges of the MDGs is that they are focused only on poverty in developing nations, and the United States has equivalent levels of poverty in inner cities, in some rural areas, and on Native American reservations. The Domestic Poverty initiative that came out of the 2009 General Convention is a response to this challenge. It has had its initial focus on Native American communities, using Asset-Based Community Development methods.We have also claimed an Anglican Communion-generated understanding of mission in the Five Marks of Mission. This has been an enormously helpful framework for thinking about what it is God sends us to do: proclaim the good news of the kingdom; teach, baptize, and nurture new believers; respond to human need through loving service; transform unjust structures of society; and care for the earth. These Five Marks are gaining traction across The Episcopal Church and across the Worldwide Anglican Communion), particularly because no one community or part of the wider church can hope to accomplish all or even one of those on its own – these marks exemplify what it means to be members of the body of Christ.3) Sustainability in mission.The DFMS was key to missionary efforts in several parts of Asia, South and Latin America, and Liberia, and also sent early missionaries to Japan and China. A number of those churches planted in those areas have grown enough to become autonomous parts of the Anglican Communion: Mexico; IARCA (Iglesia Anglicana de la Region Central de America), Brazil, the Philippines, and the Diocese of Liberia – which joined the Province of West Africa a number of years ago. We remain in close relationship with those provinces, through covenant partnerships. At the same time, autonomy in some places came in name more than real fiscal sufficiency, which we must own as one of the legacies of our own colonial mission history. Several of the dioceses of The Episcopal Church remain in that kind of dependency, which I don’t believe is representative of full dignity and partnership in the body of Christ. Mission and ministry was begun in many contexts without adequate planning for growth and development; as a result, several of these jurisdictions remain or remained on the DFMS budget dole far longer than necessary or just.A great mission focus of the 19th century urged the broader church to recognize that growing up into the full stature of Christ as a Christian community carries three broad expectations of maturity – that it be self-governing, self-sustaining, and self-propagating (cf. Henry Venn and Roland Allen). The church in China exists today as a result of effective mission work in the 19th century along those lines, and indeed, China claims this expectation in the name it gives its Protestant churches: the Three-Self Patriotic Movement (TSPM).Province IX (Latin American dioceses) and several of our covenant partners (Philippines, Mexico, IARCA, Brazil) are engaged in a vigorous strategic process toward self-sufficiency. Navajoland and Haiti are also committed to this work. What they learn and develop might also be emulated by many of our more traditional US dioceses. Former missionary districts and dioceses (e.g., Coalition 14 and its successor the Domestic Missionary Partnership, have engaged these questions for many years). Other depopulating US dioceses might partner in the learning conversation about entrepreneurial creativity, strategic mission planning, and creative multi-faceted development that arise from these initiatives.4) Organizing and structuring for mission.The last General Convention, I think, listened well to the moving of the Spirit across The Episcopal Church (and many other churches) in recent years, and challenged us as a body to look carefully at how our structures serve God’s mission or do not serve God’s mission. This Task Force on Structure is expected to report to The Episcopal Church in late 2014, with the hope that our next General Convention will take up your proposals.Change and reform are not waiting until then, however. The body charged with shaping the next General Convention, called Planning and Arrangements, has already begun to look at how we might work more effectively.Responses NeededI see a variety of responses and needs as I look around The Episcopal Church, which are being variously addressed and will need sustained leadership by bishops, other clergy, and lay leaders:Identity as Christians and Episcopalians. We need an ongoing focus on formation for ministry and mission as engaged by all the baptized. That includes theological education for all that fits the need of individual and community. How can we more effectively call and develop ordained and lay leaders for all contexts, including tentmakers (those who will find their fiscal support other than sources other than the church).A flexible and varied understanding of congregations/faith communities. For example, new monasticism (Episcopal Service Corps, intentional lay communities), congregations without permanent buildings, things like street and coffee shop ministries, or house churches.Entrepreneurial models – such as worshiping communities that grow out of justice and/or mission efforts (feeding programs, housing initiatives, cooperatives). We are going to need to rethink, restructure, and reform in order to ensure that all of these develop that are sustainable – as congregations and dioceses, and for clergy and lay leadership can be sustainable.Continued focus on mission. I believe our goal is the Kingdom of God, shalom, the beloved community, call it what you will — it means seeing this work through the lens of ensuring justice for all. That involves addressing poverty and care of the earth, so that all have full and adequate access to food, the basic stuff of life, education, employment, dignity, access to just economic systems. An essential part of this work is peace-making: questions of war, exploitation, violence including gender violence, as well as migration, poverty, and globalization.Strong, and well-formed communities of leaders are needed, that model shared and servant leadership, that operate with radical trust, creativity. We need flexibility and capacity to respond to emerging realities and the call of the Spirit.I want to encourage us to think about how we nurture and develop full communion partnerships with the ELCA, Moravians, IFI (Iglesia Filipina Independiente), and Mar Thoma Church. How can we continue to Explore other ecumenical possibilities for the sake of God’s mission.We need to engage interreligious conversation, and explore possibilities for shared mission and solidarity, for all cases where we share the common goal of a healed and reconciled world.Worldwide Anglican Communion38 autonomous provinces form the Worldwide Anglican Communion. A significant portion of the Communion has its origin in The Episcopal Church: Brazil, Mexico, IARCA, Philippines, Liberia, Cuba. Early missionaries also helped to form the churches in Japan and China. We also have a long and deep relationship with the Diocese of Jerusalem.The recent unpleasantness, as some people might call it, in the Worldwide Anglican Communion is developmental. The Communion is maturing – it’s moving from adolescence and dependency (that budget issue, again) into more adult and mutual relationships. The “Windsor process” that tried to define structures and attempted to develop an Anglican Covenant has been helpful because it has promoted far deeper and more honest conversation about relationships. We have hardly begun to explore the history of colonialism, however, from the legacy of both the British Empire and the United States.Most people would recognize the Windsor process claim of “four instruments of communion” as being the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lambeth Conference, the Primates’ Meeting, and the Anglican Consultative Council. Language about the “instruments” has shifted in recent months from surgical instruments to symphonic instruments, which I think is very significant. The ACC is clear that leadership in the Worldwide Anglican Communion needs to include the voices of laity and non-episcopal clergy, as well as women, in all its structures.Relationships across the Communion continue to grow in number, depth, and mutuality. There is increasing understanding between The Episcopal Church and the Church of England, although there is still abundant plenty of room for growth there. The recent ACC meeting (Oct-Nov 2012 in Auckland) had attendees from all but one province in the Communion, and far more effective conversation and outcomes than the previous two meetings. In spite of or in parallel with GAFCON, the Communion is still extant, although not completely what we would hope for and expect in Christian community.Relationships are essential to the life of the Communion. Several ACC initiatives are helping to develop greater missional partnerships: Continuing Indaba; Bible in the Life of the Church project; the Anglican Communion networks of several sorts.The impact of Lambeth 2008, and a meeting of North American and African bishops in Spain before Lambeth, can’t be overstated. Most recognize the real need for learning and understanding other contexts; deep engagement in missional partnership is both the way to accomplish that, and it is the fruit of that engagement.All of these communion-wide endeavors need investment, both personal and financial. Deconstructing the colonialism in our wider life and relationships is essential to answering God’s missional call. The Anglican Communion is the world’s third- largest distribution system, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches. It can be a powerful force for healing, reconciliation, and transformation toward the reign of God. Anglican and Episcopal churches exist beyond the end of the road in many countries around the world, that can offer healing, education, and transformation to the communities around them. The Anglican Alliance (of relief and development agencies of which Episcopal Relief & Development is a part) is an example of what is possible when we work together rather than separately. We have also seen what a difference it makes when one part of the Communion stands in solidarity with another. The life of people around the world has been changed by Worldwide Anglican Communion prayers and solidarity with our brothers and sisters in Zimbabwe, Jerusalem, Congo, Sudan, Japan post-tsunami, Haiti, and in the eastern United States following the storm called Sandy.All of this work toward the Reign of God depends on continuing to develop incarnate relationships, which are the outward and visible expression of the great commandment to love God and to love our neighbor as ourselves. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA General Convention 2012, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Presiding Bishop’s remarks to structure task force New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Submit a Job Listing Posted Feb 15, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Structure General Convention, Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Brad Howard says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 19, 2013 at 6:45 pm Very interesting! I’m looking forward to learning what comes out of this process.last_img read more

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Presiding Bishop brings message of hope to quake-ravaged Ecuador

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Province IX Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Clara Villatoro and Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 5, 2016 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Edgar Giraldo says: Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York July 5, 2016 at 7:38 pm Thanks for visiting us! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Michael Curry’s visit to the Episcopal Diocese of Ecuador Litoral last week was meant to show that the people hard hit by the April 16 earthquake and its aftermath are not alone.Curry assured the congregation assembled June 30 for Eucharist at Catedral Cristo Rey (Christ the King Cathedral) in Guayaquil, the diocesan see, that he brought with him the prayers of the rest of the Episcopal Church and its pledge to walk with them through the post-earthquake period.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Diocesan Bishop Alfredo Morante España participate in Eucharist June 30 in Catedral Cristo Rey (Christ the King Cathedral) in Guayaquil, the diocesan see. The Eucharist came near the conclusion of Curry’s visit to the Episcopal Diocese of Ecuador Litoral. Photo: Edgar GiraldoThe presiding bishop also encouraged the congregation to look outward. “Go out into this world and help us make a better world,” he said at the close of his sermon. “Go out into this world and show them that love is the only way. Go out into this world and join hands with all people until all of us can say: ‘We are not alone; we’ve got a God and with God we cannot fail.’”Diocesan Bishop Alfredo Morante España said Curry brought with him a message of hope for his June 27-July 1 visit to the area where a 7.8-magnitude earthquake killed 650 people and injured more than 16,600, displaced more than 30,000 people and caused billions of dollars in damage.“The presence of the presiding bishop reaffirms the pastoral work we are doing here,” Morante said in an interview.  “And clearly this accompaniment goes beyond material resources and is also the spiritual accompaniment that we offer our communities. As a church we’ve remained united: clergy, lay people and communities. The presiding bishop’s presence inspires us to continue on, and we pray that other international churches continue to support us.”Curry visited the Province of Manabí June 28-29 to spend time with people affected by the earthquake in the cities and towns of Manta, Portoviejo and La Pila.  On the evening of June 28 Curry gathered with others at San José Obrero (St. Joseph the Laborer) Episcopal Church in Manta to celebrate Eucharist in memory of those who died in the temblor.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and Monsignor Monsignor Lorenzo Voltolini, the Roman Catholic archbishop of Portoviejo-Manabi, greet each other June 29 during Curry’s visit to the Episcopal Diocese of Ecuador Litoral. Photo: Edgar GiraldoHe spent the evening of June 29 and all day June 30 in Guayaquil where he met with lay and ordained Episcopalians to discuss the challenges facing the church in the 21st century. And he preached at the cathedral Eucharist.In a video message to the rest of the Episcopal Church recorded outside the cathedral, Curry said the stories he heard throughout the diocese “have simply been remarkable.”“We’re hoping and working so that the church can be a pastoral presence for those who are living in camps, and to be of help and assistance in various communities where homes are going to need to be rebuilt,” he said, noting that four Episcopal churches in the quake-hit area were severely damaged and must be repaired or rebuilt also.“There’s work to do but this is a diocese, as it says in the Book of Nehemiah, where the people have a mind to work, and so it’s a joy to be here with their bishop, with their clergy and all the people to encourage this work,” Curry said.The presiding bishop spoke surrounded by a group from Church of the Holy Trinity on the peninsula of Santa Elena on Ecuador’s coast. He noted that a women’s group at the church helps other women build community and come to know Jesus, and that a men’s group works in recovery ministry. Those activities, he said, are just a small part of the congregation’s mission.“They go out into the neighborhoods, sharing the faith, reaching out to others and they are simply a remarkable congregation,” he said. “And if I ever had to show you an example of what the Jesus Movement is, you’re looking at it.”Turning to the people around him, Curry said, “I am proud to be your brother in faith.”Morante said that as they visited the areas affected by the earthquake and saw the destruction left behind Curry “could also see and evaluate the work being done by the church here in Ecuador.”That work, the bishop said, now involves looking forward and is focused on three issues.The first focus is the reconstruction of homes and Morante said the diocese is organizing families to provide them with materials to rebuild their own houses.Another area of development is an entrepreneurship program. “People in shelters not only want to receive food, but also want to continue their lives, to feel useful and to work,” he said. “We are supporting these families with micro credits to help them establish small businesses.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and others walk in the Refuge Esteros #2 camp in Manta, Ecuador, home to some of the thousands displaced by a 7.8-magnitude earthquake that struck April 16 just off the country’s coast. Photo: Edgar GiraldoThe third focus is spiritual and pastoral care, which Morante said has been vital since the tragedy.“We’re working with very little resources, but it is a start and we offer what we have,” he said.Morante invited people around the world to support the diocese’s work so that it can continue to help people. “The funds we have are few, but if someone also wants to support us with their knowledge as an engineer, architect, or other professional, any help is welcome,” he said.  “We also ask for prayers for these communities as they continue rebuilding their lives.”The Rev. Jairo Chiran Quiñonez, a deacon and the vicar serving Santiago Apostol (St. James the Apostle) Episcopal Church in La Pila, a small community a 40-minute drive from Manta, told ENS that Curry’s visit “leaves a mark and gives a path forward, and we are very grateful that he came to comfort us and is willing to support us. He’s doing what Jesus preached: walking alongside communities.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry blesses a woman living in the Refuge Esteros #2 camp in Manta, Ecuador. Photo: Edgar GiraldoIn the rural areas that were hardest hit, the poorest are suffering the most, Chiran said. “Poor people are, sadly, accustomed to losing everything, but there is a God who loves them and the church can help them get ahead.”Chiran said he told the presiding bishop he identified with him since Curry is the first African-American person to hold the office of presiding bishop and he is the first Afro-Ecuadorian person to be ordained a deacon in the diocese.Chiran lost part of his own home and he said he is just one of many who face the same situation, or worse. “Personally, I take refuge in my pastoral work and my daily work as a nurse,” he said. “Starting again from zero is difficult, and you can’t help but remember everything we experienced on April 16.”In the neighborhood of St. James the Apostle in La Pila, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry visited and prayed with several people affected by the April 16 earthquake. Photo: Edgar GiraldoCommunities are in the process of reconstruction now, demolishing what little remains. This phase last into early next year, he said. “There are so many people that need to rebuild and many that simply can’t.”The deacon said a man recently told him he had worked a lifetime for his home but now would “have to work the rest of my life to pay the government for it again” because the government is only offering rebuilding loans of up to $10,000, not direct aid.“Motivating ourselves to move on has been very difficult, but we know that prayers from our brothers and sisters, regardless of the congregation, have helped to encourage us,” Chiran said.  “We are beaten and worn down, but there is hope that good will still come out of this. We thank the international community for their support.”– Clara Villatoro is a journalist based in San Salvador, El Salvador. The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service.Editor’s note: A previous version of this story incorrectly identified the Roman Catholic archbishop with whom the presiding bishop met, had an incorrect last name for the Rev. Jairo Chiran Quiñonez, and included information about a planned meeting with the ecumenical community that did not occur. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Latin America, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Presiding Bishop brings message of hope to quake-ravaged Ecuador ‘I am proud to be your brother in faith,’ Curry tells Diocese of Ecuador Litoral Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

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