Fishing the North Coast: Depth changes coming for remainder of 2017 groundfish season

first_imgOn Sept. 18, the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) voted to bring groundfish depth restrictions for the balance of 2017 back to 2016 depths in California from Point Conception to the Oregon border according to an Oct. 3 article in the Fish Sniffer Magazine. The reason behind the depth restriction is the yelloweye rockfish is predicted to exceed harvest guidelines. By allowing anglers to target deeper water, more yelloweye were caught and likely misidentified, leading to an …last_img read more

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Klamath fall quotas begin August 15

first_imgThe salmon rebuilding process is in full swing on the Klamath and Trinity Rivers. Following last year’s complete ocean and fall salmon river closures, we didn’t have anywhere to go but up. And that looks like exactly where we’re headed. The CDFW has forecasted roughly 93,500 adult fall-run kings will return to the Klamath basin this year, which is a big leap from last year’s 31,838 returnees. The rebuilding process was boosted by the 21,903 jacks (two-year old salmon) that also made their way …last_img read more

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Increase Your Production Values with Simple Costume Design

first_imgCostume design doesn’t have to mean sewing everything by hand. Here are some tips for improving your production value with a little planning.Fashion communicates a lot about our personalities. The styles we like, the colors we choose, and the way we wear our clothes says a lot about our characteristics. We can’t help but judge a book by its cover. The same goes for how we perceive the characters in a film.Costume design is a critical aspect of filmmaking, but it doesn’t always have to mean creating tings from scratch. If you’re filming on a budget, you can still pull off great costume design with discount or thrift shopping. To do so, you just need to keep in mind how to communicate with costume design.Costume Communicates CharacterWhen deciding on the costume for your characters, consider, of course, the setting of the film, but more importantly, think about the personalities of your characters. Are they confident? Powerful? Do they have fine tastes like James Bond? Does that determine the look? Bond doesn’t always wear a tux, but he is always sharply dressed. His clothing fits well, the colors coordinate nicely, and the style exudes confidence.Also keep in mind a character’s silhouette. James Bond’s silhouette is all strong lines that his clothing accentuates; he looks like a man in control. The same goes for Indiana Jones, for whom the mere shadow of his costume communicates his personality.Image via Lucas Film.Colors can also communicate certain traits. Traditionally, red signifies power and passion — and sometimes danger. Blue often connotes tranquility and peace. White indicates innocence and purity. For example, what better color could make up the costume of the young and naive Luke Skywalker in A New Hope? Or Tony Stark wearing red and gold? Red for his powerful status and passionate persona, and gold for his wealth and extravagance.Image via Marvel Studios.However, keep in mind that the meanings associated with color depend on the setting or even the genre of your film — and how the writer and director establish certain colors. For instance, yellow may usually represent brightness and joy, but in The Great Gatsby, yellow represents a vile nature and putridity.Image via Warner Bros.Character ProgressionCostume Design is another way to communicate character development. This happens most obviously in superhero origin stories. Once our character is ready to step up and become a hero, they create their new costume to represent who they have become. Bruce Wayne makes and dons the batsuit to become Batman, and Tony Stark does the same to become Iron Man.As Luke Skywalker progresses from a naive young man to a no-nonsense Jedi master, his costume changesImages via Disney.This represents Luke’s progression from a naive adolescent to a jaded warrior, when he begins to face the temptation of joining the dark side like his father (further symbolized by his prosthetic hand). However, after Luke passes his final test and refuses to kill his father, the inside of his shirt falls open, revealing a white lining, and that purity and goodness still shines through him.Now, these aren’t the most subtle examples of character development communicated through costume design, but they quickly and easily relay the point. Your own costume design doesn’t have to be so obvious, or even have the deepest meaning behind it. Your character’s wardrobe should match the character’s personality and their background — not the actor’s, if you’re not providing wardrobe. A hipster won’t dress like a skater, nor will a wealthy housewife dress like a construction worker. When characters don’t dress in a manner that complements their own styles, everything feels mismatched and out of place.Everything in the frame matters and communicates some degree of the story to the audience. Costume design is one of the the most important aspects of filmmaking because it communicates even more quickly than a character’s dialogue. Think carefully about your characters and choose their costumes wisely.Cover image via MGM.Looking for more filmmaking tips and tricks? Check out  these articles.Pre-Production Tips: The Basics of Breaking Down a ScriptEvery Editor’s Secret Weapon: Royalty-Free FootageCinematography Tip: Working with Unmotivated Camera MovementLens Tips: Doing the Work of Four Lenses with TwoFilmmaking Fundamentals: Using Blocking to Get Your Scenes Movinglast_img read more

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Sea Shepherd Japan Kills Another 333 Minke Whales

first_imgzoom The Japanese whaling fleet has reached its self-allocated quota of killing 333 minke whales in the Southern Ocean as part of the country’s latest “research mission,” the marine conservation organization Sea Shepherd informed.Japan reached its goal “despite our efforts to once again disrupt the slaughter of whales,” Sea Shepherd said, adding that the organization has called an emergency meeting of the Global Board of Directors in Amsterdam this weekend to review its whale defense strategy in the Southern Ocean.Sea Shepherd earlier informed that the whale poachers expanded their killing fields to twice as big as before, and as a result, the organization’s patrol vessels “were searching for a handful of trucks in an area twice as big as Australia.”“We were aware of the challenges from the outset of the campaign – the doubling of the whaling area and the reduced quota that would be easier to reach – but we did our best despite the odds because it was the right thing to do. And – as usual – we did it alone. It is a reminder that the needless slaughter of marine life will continue unless governments stop making hollow statements of disapproval and start taking action to hold Japan accountable,” Sea Shepherd said.In early December 2016, the patrol vessels Steve Irwin and Ocean Warrior started their voyage to the Southern Ocean as part of the 11th Antarctic whale defense campaign, Operation Nemesis, in an effort to intercept the Japanese whaling fleet and stop the slaughter of minke whales.On December 22, the Ocean Warrior intercepted the Nisshin Maru, one of the harpoon ships of the Japanese whale-poaching fleet in the Australian Whale Sanctuary, with a dead minke whale on the vessel’s deck.The images of the dead whale on the deck of the Nisshin Maru were the first which document the Japanese whaling fleet’s killing of whales since the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled their whaling program illegal in 2014 and the Australian Federal Court found the Japanese whaling industry in contempt for killing protected whales in the Australian Whale Sanctuary.Prior to the launch of the whaling season in 2015, Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said that the country plans to catch up to 333 minke whales on an annual basis in the following 12 years.last_img read more

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Uber shows off its vision for future flying taxi

A model of Uber’s electric vertical take-off and landing vehicle concept (eVTOL)—a cross between a helicopter and a drone—was displayed at the second annual Uber Elevate Summit in Los Angeles.”Our goal is to radically improve global mobility,” said Uber Aviation product chief Nikhil Goel.Goel said the all-electric flyer can achieve speeds over 300 kilometers (200 miles) an hour with a range of 100 kilometers (60 miles) on a battery charge.”We fly a lot so we can prove to the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and the public that these aircraft are safe,” he said.Uber has become a global force in transportation with its ridesharing service, but is also working on autonomous vehicles and other forms of transport.Uber plans the first demonstration flights for Los Angeles in 2020 and commercialization of the flying taxis in 2023, saying these could be ordered on demand just like a ridesharing vehicle.Eric Allison, who heads Uber’s Aviation programs, said the flying vehicles are part of an overall strategy allowing people to do without personal cars.”The rational choice for transportation will be less and less to own and drive a car,” Allison said.”We want to price it so low, it’ll be irrational to drive your car.”The first flying taxis will be designed with a pilot, according to Allision, but over time can be developed as autonomous vehicles.At the conference at the Skirball Center in Los Angeles, Uber showed films and models of a futuristic city with such vehicles, seemingly inspired by the film “Blade Runner.”The concept includes “skyports” that would serve as hubs for the aerotaxis.Several other companies along with Uber are trying to develop similar kinds of aerial devices.Uber operations director Jeff Holen says the obstacles to the new transport mode are mostly around regulations of air space, adding, “The technology exists… we can solve this today.” It’s not a bird, nor a plane. But Uber’s new prototype vehicle unveiled Tuesday shows off its vision of the future of transportation—a “flying taxi” that aims to alleviate urban congestion. Uber gives up autonomous vehicle testing rights in Calif. A model of Uber’s electric vertical take-off and landing vehicle concept (eVTOL) flying taxi is displayed at the second annual Uber Elevate Summit in Los Angeles, California © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Uber shows off its vision for future ‘flying taxi’ (2018, May 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-uber-vision-future-taxi.html Explore further read more

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