SEALNG Expands Presence in America with ÉNESTAS

first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy of WMN Mexico-based LNG company ÉNESTAS has joined SEA\LNG, a multi-sector industry coalition aiming at accelerating the adoption of LNG as a marine fuel.With the addition of ÉNESTAS, the SEA\LNG coalition bolsters its efforts to drive forward LNG as a marine fuel and to progress its role as a viable solution in the energy transition within shipping.As the largest private LNG company in Mexico and with the largest LNG distribution network, ÉNESTAS is expected to support the coalition’s vision of a competitive global LNG value chain for cleaner maritime shipping by 2020.Commenting on the latest addition to the coalition, Peter Keller, SEA\LNG chairman and executive vice president, TOTE Inc., said: “SEA\LNG continues to unite organisations from across the LNG value chain to address market barriers to LNG uptake, and to help transform the use of LNG as a marine fuel into a global reality. With several ports under development in North America, including in the Gulf of Mexico, we look forward to leveraging ÉNESTAS’ vast network and capabilities within the region to support the continued growth and investment in LNG bunkering infrastructure.”Since launching in July 2016, SEA\LNG’s membership has grown rapidly from 13 to 34 members, demonstrating the industry’s attention to LNG as a cost-effective, safe, and environmentally friendly long-term bridging solution to a zero-emissions shipping industry.“We expect LNG to become the dominant fuel for transportation by road, rail, and sea. LNG is currently the most safe, clean, and economically viable marine fuel on the market and will continue to substitute diesel as the fuel of choice. We’re excited to be part of SEA\LNG and to work with our fellow members to promote knowledge and understanding of the full benefits that LNG has to offer,” Caio Zapata M, chief executive officer, ÉNESTAS, said.LNG emits zero sulphur oxides (SOx), virtually zero particulate matter (PM), and compared to existing heavy marine fuel oils, LNG can emit 90% less nitrogen oxides (NOx).With regards to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the maritime sector, reductions of up to 20% are achievable now with LNG. As technology continues to develop, these reductions will increase. Furthermore, LNG, in combination with efficiency measures being developed for new ships in response to the IMO’s Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), will provide a way of meeting the IMO’s decarbonization target of a 40% decrease by 2030 for international shipping.last_img read more

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World Beyond Dance

first_imgFrench directors Pierre X Garnier and Jose Revault are working on a documentary which traces the life of ace choreographer Terence Lewis as a man in his 40s and follows his move to step away from the world of dance for acting.Lewis met the directors – the founders of 7eme Lune, the International Film Festival of Rennes for young directors in France –during his vacation in Corsica in 2016. He hid his identity, but they discovered about him through social media. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”I was pleasantly surprised when they told me that they want to do a documentary because I was very curious to, first of all, know why they want to do a documentary as I have already shot for lots of television shows where a lot of my life has been captured, especially the BBC show ‘Har Ghar Kuch Kehta Hai’.”I have also spoken about my life quite a lot of times to newspapers, channels and there have been lots of stories about from where I come from and how and where I have reached here,” said Lewis. So, he wasn’t keen to add one more story. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”But they explained to me that, ‘We were not interested in your story (going) from rags to riches because that’s already been kind of documented. We don’t want to talk about your success, films, TV shows or any other things that are already there. We want to talk about all the things I shared with them in Corsica on a one-on-one’… They found my personal talk with them very interesting.” The dance guru says the documentary is “different from the regular” ones. “It is a little bit more internal, in the head and deep… It is not about me talking about my success, my laurels or how amazing my journey is… It is about me as a person now in the present – what are the challenges I am facing as a man in 40s, as a person who is also moving from dance and taking a step… into films as an actor and writer… so it is that journey that they want to chronicle.” They have shot around 40 per cent and, technically, “need to have 60 hours of footage to make it into a documentary series”.The makers are now crowdfunding to shoot the latter part of the film and for post-production. They need to raise around Rs 700,000.”What started as a simple project has now become a full-fledged project and we are on Wishberry this month, urging people to help us make the film to just cover the basic expenses of shooting, editing and camera…I hope we are able to reach the target.”He runs the Terence Lewis Contemporary Dance Company and specialises in Indian folk, contemporary and neo-classical dance forms. He has even choreographed international stage shows, Bollywood shows, Broadway Western musicals and music videos. He became popular as a mentor and judge on ‘Dance India Dance’. What was his first reaction to the documentary project?”I was like ‘Oh my God, that’s bit scary’ as I spoke to them like friends… Like sharing my life about things that were beyond my films and work. I spoke to them about my personal quest… how I was searching for meaning in my life and the philosophies that combine us, politics to history.”They were like, ‘We want to talk about many things that are going on in your head’ because they found my philosophy – and a certain aspect of my questioning and reasoning things and embracing certain aspects of life – very interesting.”They wanted to present this kind of an Indian man, a thinking Indian man with certain questions about life, to the Western universe and they said it is very important for an Indian voice to be heard. And they were very curious about new India and (the) conversations that are happening between the traditional and conventional and politics and history.”Lewis said they were interested in the artistic and cultural changes that are happening in India, and to know how he perceived India as opposed to the Western form, what are the difficulties, strengths of living in a country like this.He also shared with them his thoughts on nationality, region and ethnicity, apart from a lot about life and the ways people are dealing with relationships, choices, why we are the way we are.last_img read more

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Dont Try to Be Disruptive To Really Have an Impact You Need

first_imgMarch 13, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. 6 min read The inventor and author Ray Kurzweil likes to say that the next 100 years will resemble 20,000 years of progress if we continue to innovate at our current rate. I think rather that next 15 years will feel like walking into the future — the way it must have felt at the turn of the 20th century.In 1895, people washed clothing by hand, traveled by horse and chopped trees with axes. By 1910, they could use a washing machine, travel in a Ford Model T and cut down trees with a chainsaw. Planes flew overhead, streets were lit with electricity and telephones were becoming ubiquitous.Related: ‘The Jetsons’ World Is Becoming Reality. Innovators, Start Your Engines.Between now and 2032, American society will experience changes of that magnitude again. The entrepreneurs who thrive over the next 15 years will be those who reverse engineer the future.Too many founders settle for building “features” — incremental novelties that modify mature technology. Reverse engineering is for entrepreneurs who want to build disruptive technology (hint: if your marketers have to say it’s “disruptive,” it’s not).Reverse engineering the future has three steps:What does the future look like?What is the hidden need in that future?When will that future be ready?Related: Human Intuition Is the Future of Innovation and EntrepreneurshipThe hard part is answering those questions, not asking them. Let’s examine how the best reverse engineers do it.Start from the summit.Elon Musk reverse engineered the future. I have proof from his 2006 blog post titled “The Secret Tesla Motors Master Plan (just between you and me)”:Build sports car.Use that money to build an affordable car.Use that money to build an even more affordable car.While doing above, also provide zero emission electric power generation options.Don’t tell anyone.In the same post, Musk wrote that “… the overarching purpose of Tesla Motors (and the reason I am funding the company) is to help expedite the move from a mine-and-burn hydrocarbon economy toward a solar electric economy, which I believe to be the primary, but not exclusive, sustainable solution.”The 2006 post shows that Musk worked from a future — the solar electric economy — backward to the short-term goal of making an electric roadster faster than a Porsche. It’s as if Musk planned an ascent up Mt. Everest from the summit, not the base.That’s step one in reverse engineering. Start in the future and plan your way back to the present.Related: 5 Traits That Distinguish True InnovatorsFind hidden needs.Entrepreneurs love talking about unmet needs. The press releases all say, “We fulfilled an unmet need in [generic industry].” I prefer entrepreneurs who find hidden needs that people don’t know they have. That’s step two in reverse engineering the future.I credit consultant and polymath Sylvie Leotin for inspiring my thinking. She created a groundbreaking model that combines empathy and multidisciplinary techniques to help companies reverse engineer the hidden needs of customers. She argues that you find hidden needs through empathy.Apple once struggled with empathy. In the late 1980s, it developed Newton, a PDA that sold from 1993 to 1998. I was a consultant on the project. At the first Newton focus group, the facilitator said, “Imagine a computer you can carry around and write on with a stylus.”The participants asked questions like, how fast is it? How big is the hard drive? How much memory does it hold? They were trained to buy computers.At the second focus group, the facilitator said, “Imagine you have magic paper that makes everything you write digital.” That didn’t work either.Meanwhile, Palm figured out the hidden need. People wanted rapid connectivity everywhere, but they couldn’t lug around phone books in their pockets and purses. Its PDA stored names, phones numbers, appointments and other information about relationships. The PalmPilot had empathy. Newton just had features.Related: This Innovation Expert’s Research Shows How Anyone Can Be Like Elon Musk or Steve JobsSet a stage.If you’re struggling with hidden needs, learn from Disney. When I was consulting for Disney in the 1990s, it wanted to create a better TV remote control. These were the days when you clicked channel up, channel down or numbers.Disney built a living room with couches and TVs where it could test remote controls. Rather than thinking like customers, the Disney team acted like them. It produced a grid-based remote control that could visit any channel in three or four clicks. It remains an intuitive and rapid navigator, although Disney’s business interests went elsewhere.Twenty years later, Netflix still can’t get channel navigation right. Browsing shelves at Blockbuster was easier than scrolling through Netflix today. Maybe Netflix needs an imaginary living room.Disney built a stage and played out different scripts until it found the best one. It practiced empathy through imagination and story.Related: What Does It Take to Be a High Performing Company in a Disruptive World?Ready, set, wait.The reverse engineer’s vision is less of a goal and more of an inevitability. That’s why reverse engineers have the confidence for step three: wait until the future is ready. The technology will speak to you when everything comes together. Apple envisioned the iPad in 1987, but had to wait over 20 years for cost, capability and connectivity to come together. They say there are three rules of real estate: location, location, location. I say there are four rules of venture capital: too early, too early, too early, too late!Take virtual reality (VR) as an example. Facebook spent $2 billion on Oculus Rift and now plans to spend another $3 billion over the next decade. Zuckerberg says VR quality won’t be good enough until the end of those 10 years.Related: 4 Tips for Developing a Product Around an Unknown ConceptToo early! VR needs a few flips of Moore’s Law to achieve sufficient computer power and resolution in a compact device. After Facebook has spent a decade and $3 billion, some startup will make a better VR headset for a tiny fraction of the cost.No company can invent every technology it needs for its future. Thus, Tesla sells fancy cars you can drive now, not affordable cars that (maybe) will drive themselves in five years. What is Oculus going to do for a decade?Here’s why reverse engineering matters.As a venture capitalist, I hope you build revolutionary companies. You don’t need to convince anyone that you’re “making the world a better place” or trying to “have an impact” (on what?).The people who created washing machines, cars and chainsaws between 1895 and 1910 weren’t trying to save the world. They weren’t trying to be disruptive. They were trying to make great products (and lots of money). Your better world will be a side effect of reverse engineering the future.Related Video: How Does a New Tech Product Get to Market? Register Now » Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.last_img read more

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