Flores dismissal maddens Monk

first_img “The harshest punishment is getting sent off and Chico got sent off.” Swansea now head to Newcastle next Saturday, still needing probably one more win from their last four fixtures to retain their top-flight status. “I’ve told the players that we have shown that desire and attitude not to be beaten,” Monk said. “Unfortunately, we have come away on a couple of occasions with nothing, but I’ve just said to them if we show exactly what we have done for the last four games then we will have no problems. “We are not in a good position. We are not secure, and with four games left that’s not the position you want to be in. It’s in our hands, but we have to do something quickly and get something out of the next game.” Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho opted not to attend his post-match press conference, handing the job instead to assistant coach Steve Holland. “Jose asked me to do it,” Holland said, without offering any further explanation. “It is something I have done a few times this year, and it is something I am more than happy to do it when he asks me.” On the Flores cautions, Holland added: “In my opinion, the two yellow card decisions were crystal clear. “I have seen them both back, and I think the referee was quite clearly correct on both counts. “I think the referee made the decision, and he made the decision correctly. “As to who he speaks to and how long he takes over the decision, you would have to ask him how that works. For sure, ultimately he made the right decision. “It (Swansea away) has always been a difficult fixture for us. “They are a team that is very much based around keeping possession of the ball, and they can frustrate you for long periods because it is difficult to build pressure up against them. “On the back of a Champions League game in midweek, which is emotionally, physically and mentally draining, you always worry about the impact that has on your next fixture. “It is a fantastic three points for us, and very much a case of getting over the line, really.” Ba also scored the winner when Chelsea booked their Champions League semi-final place last Tuesday by knocking out Paris St Germain on away goals, and the title race is now hurtling towards a potential decider when Mourinho’s team visit Anfield in two weeks’ time. “Not much has changed. We are five points clear of Manchester City, and they have two games more to play than us. If Manchester City win all their matches, they finish ahead of Chelsea,” Holland said. “Obviously, it has been a good day for Liverpool, and it looks like being an exciting conclusion to the season. “We have probably got to win all of our games, one way or another. “That’s the likelihood, but we have been facing that task now for a good couple of weeks, certainly on the back of our result at Crystal Palace. I think any leeway we had was eliminated after that result.” Monk cut an exasperated figure on the touchline after Flores received two yellow cards in little more than two minutes, meaning Swansea played over two thirds of the game with 10 men. They were finally undone by Demba Ba’s 68th-minute winner, which kept Chelsea two points behind league leaders Liverpool and Swansea still in relegation danger. Swansea boss Garry Monk was left frustrated and infuriated by defender Chico Flores’ early dismissal in his team’s 1-0 home defeat against Barclays Premier League title contenders Chelsea. “If you go by the letter of the law it is a sending off, but if you do letter of the law every single game then you will get six or seven sendings off a game,” Monk said. “The disappointing thing was that he (referee Phil Dowd) looked like he signalled straight away ‘no’ – as if to signal it didn’t warrant another yellow. “Then their bench and manager surrounds the fourth official and their players surround the referee and then the red card comes later on. “It makes you wonder, doesn’t it? “But I know Phil, and he is an honest guy. I don’t think he responded to the pressure. If he says it was him giving himself time, then it is him giving himself time. But the circumstances make it strange. “It’s not great when people are asking for the ref to dish out a red card, but what can you do. It happens, and you trust that the ref was strong enough to deal with all that.” Assessing Flores’ two cautions, Monk added: “I’m not disappointed in him, but he is an experienced pro and he should have used that experience in that situation. “We have all been in that situation where you have been booked, and especially if it’s early on, you are then treading on a tightrope for the rest of the game. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Nevin, Flynn win at Chris Angell Fall Classic

first_imgELLSWORTH — Brooklin’s Lindsay Nevin and Hancock’s Sean Flynn were among the winners at the annual Chris Angell Fall Classic on Saturday the Ellsworth Tennis Center.Nevin defeated fellow Brooklin native Courtney Bianco to win the girls’ 18-year-old singles championship. The two are also teammates on the George Stevens Academy tennis team.Flynn won the 14-year-old singles title on the boys’ side. He defeated Max Friedlander of Bar Harbor to take home the title.The tournament is named for Chris Angell, who was formerly the top male tennis player in the state of Maine. Fall and winter editions are held every year. Funds from the tournament went toward raising awareness and supporting treatment for individuals with serious mental illnesses.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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Holy Cross Expanding and Renovating Historic Church

first_imgBy John BurtonRUMSON – Half of Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church is gone – demolished to make way for the new.It took a little getting used to for church officials who had difficulty seeing the church – with its long history – intentionally being torn down.Rev. Michael Manning, pastor of Holy Cross R.C. Church in Rumson, stands in front of the recently dismantled church, the first part of the renovation and expansion.“It was hard to watch it get started,” said the Rev. Michael Manning, pastor of the church, 30 Ward Ave., recalling how in July construction workers began the process of dismantling the rear portion of the church to prepare for the expansion and renovation project.Looking at what remains – the front portion of the structure, up to where the altar was located and will again be, the steeple topped by the cross atop and the front entrance – Manning said he is struck by “its simplicity.” That made the pastor think about the church’s beginnings in 1895 and the spiritual role it has played in the community since then.The actual severing of the back end of the building was accomplished in just two days with two workers operating what Manning described as large chainsaws and cherry pickers. After the building was bifurcated, other workers then helped with the demolition of it and the former church rectory and hauled away the debris.The work “was so quick,” it took Manning by surprise.Having the demolition done during the summer worked out well because the elementary school was closed and the students weren’t on hand.“I think some of the kids would have been upset” seeing the demolition, Manning said.Manning acknowledged there were some historic preservation advocates who were not pleased about the work and the loss of part of the original building. But Manning insisted the project has taken into consideration the site’s history and the new building will complement it.As the work continues, Manning said church staff members have been getting a lot of questions, and have seen people coming by to take photos of the half of a building and the deep pit that was dug behind it for the future work.“Mostly, they ask when will it be finished,” Manning said.People have been “a little surprised at how big the hole is and how little of the original church remains.”Pastoral assistant Lori La Plante, observed how reaction to the work has broken down by gender. Following Sunday Masses, which are being conducted in the elementary school’s gymnasium, women expressed some nostalgia about the loss of the old building; men were excited about the scope of the work and how quickly it was accomplished. “It really did split right down the middle,” La Plante said.The church project was discussed and planned for more than a decade, with Holy Cross officials looking to expand facilities to accommodate its growing congregation.The project is expected to be under construction until late 2014 and is likely to cost about $6 million, with Holy Cross representatives conducting a capital campaign to cover costs.Next week, workers are scheduled to start laying the foundation. Once that is done the construction will start moving forward at a good clip, Manning said.“We’ll now be on the con-struction part of it,” he said.last_img read more

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Luiz is likely to miss both games against Barcelona- report

first_imgManchester City are reported to be planning to re-sign Daniel Sturridge from Chelsea in the summer.There has been speculation about Sturridge’s future for some time and the Manchester Evening News say City, who sold him to Chelsea three years ago, want to take him back to Eastlands.David Luiz has reportedly been ruled out of Wednesday’s Champions League semi-final clash with Barcelona and is likely to miss the second leg too.The Chelsea defender was declared doubtful for this week’s game after being carried off with a hamstring injury during the FA Cup victory over Tottenham at Wembley on Sunday.The Sun say Luiz will definitely miss Barca’s visit to Stamford Bridge as well as this weekend’s vital league game against Arsenal – and is unlikely to be fit in time for the Blues’ trip to the Nou Camp.Meanwhile, ex-Chelsea striker Nicolas Anelka has reiterated his desire to see Blues star Didier Drogba join him at Chinese club Shanghai Shenhua along with former Paris St-Germain man Selim Benachour.The Sun quote Anelka as saying: “I hope Benachour and Drogba will quickly join us.”And Mark Hughes has pencilled in a £4m bid to take Wolves goalkeeper Wayne Hennessey to QPR, the Daily Star say.Manager Hughes is said to be planning to table an offer for the 25-year-old if Rangers stay up and Wolves are relegated.Hughes knows the Wales international well and is tipped to make a move for him as soon as the season ends.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Here is your horoscope for October 18

first_imgARIESThe Empress gives you balance in life and fulfillment in relationships. Friends are caring, while women play positive roles. Creative pastimes are rejuvenating, business partnerships lucrative and family loving. Success in business comes through goodwill. Lucky number 3. Colour pink.TAURUSThere is a partnership or collaboration developing. Personal decisions are made and family plans are actualized. Synergy and participation of all concerned takes you towards goals. You may balance and combine talent and aspects of work that add to your success. Lucky number 9. Colour blue.GEMINIThe Moon brings a karmic situation to the fore as you are faced with a difficult emotional choice. Emotional people and mood swings may not be easy to deal with at home. Business and finances can go through a temporary low that needs to be taken in your stride. Lucky number 18. Colour grey.CANCERYou are sensitive and may be thrown off by new situations at work and developments at home. Inner balance brings equilibrium in your partnerships. Sporting activity keeps you on top of things. Partnerships have to be defined and deals should be studied. Lucky number 8. Colour pale blue.LEOYouthful energy and happy times mark this day with pleasure. Children and family are demanding and in turn bring joy. You can be dreamy and romantic in relationships. You can be creative in an engaging project. Professional assignments bring out your potential. Lucky number 9. Colour wine red.VIRGOYou find your way out of difficulties by using your intelligence. Your clarity and understanding brings relationships and professional matters to a positive conclusion. Visitors and news can be expected. You tend to be speedy while it’s better to be steady. Lucky number 6. Colour blue.advertisementLIBRAYou may feel a bit defeated by situations. Allow space and time for things to change on their own. You are emotional when it comes to loved ones and family. Take this time off, to relax, while situations clear up and positive changes come of their own accord. Lucky number 5. Colour green.SCORPIOUnexpected happenings are on the cards today. A mystical experience gives you a sense of wonder. A business opportunity emerges from nowhere and helps you make a long sought for change. Things generally turn round positively as breakthroughs are affected. Lucky number 6. Colour ebony.SAGITTARIUSThe Hanged Man manifests the spirit of the mighty waters as several changes flow in, and the past is left behind. You need to let go old relationships and work situations to move into the new current. Be very firm about making a positive change. Lucky number 12. Colour green.CAPRICORNYou may be disappointed in relationships and disillusioned in situations, as expectations are not fulfilled. Move forward with confidence to avoid further disappointment. You have great energy to achieve targets. Meditate on interdependent relationships. Lucky number 5. Colour orange.AQUARIUSYou are a free spirit as you get in touch with inner courage and originality. Love and romance bring relationships to a point of commitment. You opt for space in all situations by moving away from restrictions. Be yourself in all situations to gain success. Lucky number 9. Colour green.PISCESLife presents you with opportunities and connections that lead to inner and outer changes. A special assignment takes you to interesting situations. A new vision opens the way to a breakthrough in old patterns. Redecorating your home changes its energy. Lucky number 8. Colour white.last_img read more

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‘Suresh Raina abused me’, Umar Akmal once complained to MS Dhoni. What happened next?

first_imgContrary to popular belief, former India captain MS Dhoni does get angry on the field at times but still does not betray his emotion, especially during overs, revealed teammate Suresh Raina.Dhoni is known for his calm demeanour and has also been nicknamed ‘Captain Cool’ by fans and cricket pundits but Raina says the 36-year-old cracked the whip on his players if the need arose. MSD would express his displeasure with sloppy fielding or poor work ethics on the field during advertisement breaks between overs.”He does get angry, you don’t see it. The cameras don’t pick it up. But as soon as the telecast cuts to advertisements, he’ll go ‘Sudhar ja tu’. He does it inconspicuously,” Raina told Gaurav Kapoor on his show Breakfast with Champions.However, mostly, as captain Dhoni would maintain a poker face even when the fielders messed up on the field and Raina says the teammates could not figure out whether he was angry or otherwise. Reason? He did not wear shades!”Despite not wearing sunglasses… you still cannot tell. Because he doesn’t even wear sunglasses…His eyes don’t show any emotion. And I’m like, ‘come on man… show us some reaction’,” he added.Raina then went on to narrate a funny incident when Dhoni once backed him to ‘needle’ Umar Akmal and put him under pressure in a game against Pakistan.”We were playing against Pakistan and Umar Akmal complained to him about me saying ‘Dhoni bhai, look at him (Raina)…he is using foul language’. I told Dhoni that I wasn’t using any foul language.advertisement”Then Dhoni asked me ‘what happened?’. I said ‘I’m just needling him.. telling him to score some runs, they have a target to chase’. To which Mahi bhai told me ‘keep the pressure on him.”Dhoni’s prowess as a cricketer is not just limited to being the best finisher in the limited-overs formats and he is equally good at reading the game situation, according to Raina.”He is very good at reading the game situation. He is hailed as the world’s best finisher…he knows what’s going to happen next. At any given point, he is ready with three different game plans… A, B, C… Be it as a batsman, as keeper, as captain…he is always ready with different plans.”He plans overnight. Then he gets a feel for it in the morning and tries to visualize. He makes sure that his conscious mind understands the subconscious ideas.”So, a lot of people don’t know this about him. Which is why he remains calm, because at the end of the day he knows that it’s his game. He has created this entire setup with his thought process,” Raina said.last_img read more

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Tasmania Set For Big Weekend Of Touch Football

first_imgTasmania’s best players will battle it out for State Cup honours on Saturday, 27 November, while a record number of junior teams will compete in the Junior State Cup on Sunday, 28 November 2010.Southern Touch and Launceston Touch Association will contest all six divisions (Men’s Open, Women’s Open, Mixed Open, Men’s 30’s, 18’s Boys, 18’s Girls) while Devonport Touch Association will also compete in the Mixed Open division. Games will commence at 9.00am, with the finals/final games to be played in the following timeslots: 3.25pmMen’s 30’s – Game Three18’s Boys – Game Three4.20pmMen’s Open – Game Three18’s Girls – Game Three5.15pmWomen’s Open FinalMixed Open FinalSunday will see 20 junior teams compete in the Junior State Cup across six divisions – 12’s Boys, 12’s Girls, 14’s Boys, 14’s Girls, 16’s Boys and16’s Girls. Finals of the Junior State Cup will be played in the following timeslots:4.50pm14’s Boys Final12’s Girls – DTA v Pirates (Game Three)12’s Boys Final5.40pm16’s Girls Final16’s Boys Final14’s Girls FinalFor more information, please visit Touch Football Tasmania’s website: www.tastouch.com.aulast_img read more

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3 days agoLiverpool youngster Jack Bearne signs first pro contract

first_imgLiverpool youngster Jack Bearne signs first pro contractby Paul Vegas3 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool youngster Jack Bearne has signed his first professional contract.The versatile forward, who turned 18 last month, is a member of Barry Lewtas’ U18s squad.Born in Nottingham, Bearne originally signed for the Reds in December 2016 from his hometown club Notts County and moved to the city in April 2017.He played a significant role in the success of the U18 team last season, converting a penalty in the decisive shootout which secured victory in the FA Youth Cup and scoring the winner in both meetings with Everton. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Muskrat Falls Ecological Grief Resistance became a profound unstoppable force says researcher

first_img“We see a dramatic increase and a rise in terms of national security resources and national security language starting to focus their attention, target, and police Indigenous movements with more and more intensity,” Monaghan explains.“You have an intensification of surveillance, you have more and more resources, and of course you have a reframing of a local conflict over land, over complex histories, being reduced to national security, notions of extremism, and being really reframed as very criminal and violent threats.”Pasternak and Monaghan both point to the concept of Canada’s “critical infrastructure,” which they argue the government, police, and corporations are working together to protect from Indigenous people who don’t want pipelines, dams and other developments they say are harmful on their lands.“In different bureaucracies, institutions at the national security level of policing, they’ve patched in all kinds of relationships and partnerships with private corporations that allow private corporations, which include the kind of energy branches of large energy corporations as well as private security who are employed by these corporations, to feed in intelligence, to do their own forms of surveillance and feed in intelligence that goes into policing databanks [and] into policing intelligence resources.”“Exhausting” but worth the fight, say land protectorsBeatrice Hunter, an Inuk grandmother and land protector who was the first of four from Labrador to stand in court and say ‘no’ to the injunction, and subsequently do time at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in St. John’s, says navigating the legal system while being under the watchful eye of the RCMP has taken a toll on her.“I never thought I’d be caught up in the court system,” she says. “I was never a lawbreaker, so it’s a very tiring, exhausting process and I hope I don’t get burned out.”Watch Part 2 of Justin’s Ecological Grief. At the same time, she says, “my ancestors cry out to me all the time, telling me that this is our land. So I get strength from my ancestors.”Hunter says she has “lost hope with the provincial and federal government,” and that “it seems that corporations are running the government.”While she and others continue to resist Muskrat Falls, Cole says a strength is building among Indigenous communities across Canada, “because we all recognize shared oppression and devastation to water, and devastation to land.“There’s a collective truth that’s spreading throughout Turtle Island, and it’s that our colonial oppressors are never going to be truthful. They’re never going to try to reconcile. They’re always going to try to manipulate and make deals — and if it isn’t us as people who make these changes, they won’t happen.”Kim Campbell-McLean also faces charges related to the Muskrat Falls protests. She was among the land protectors who occupied the work site in 2016.The Inuk women’s advocate from North West River spoke at the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Inquiry hearings in Labrador in March and cited large resource development projects like Muskrat Falls as one of the barriers Indigenous women and children face to accessing traditional foods, and to becoming less dependent on violent men.“Mining. Dams. It’s destroying our food sources for Inuit women and children,” she told the Inquiry.Campbell-McLean later told APTN in reference to the Muskrat Falls occupation and the charges she faces that she would “do it all over again — and I would do it every day of my life if I had to, in order to protect that for our women and our children and our culture, and our integrity and our values as people.”Charlotte Wolfrey, an Elder from the Nunatsiavut community of Rigolet, also faces charges for resisting Muskrat Falls.She says she participated in a blockade of the Muskrat Falls site days before the occupation in October 2016 because it “was a matter of continuing our culture like it was — our continuance as a people, really.”Eldred Davis, Jim Learning and Marjorie Flowers all spent time at Her Majesty’s Penitentiary after refusing to promise a judge they would stay away from the Muskrat Falls site.She agrees with Cunsolo’s assessment of ecological grief as a driving force behind the Muskrat Falls protests, and also argues that Inuit have a unique obligation to their ancestral lands, waters and resources.When she went before a judge last year, she explained this to him.“He asked me if I understood the charges, and I told him I understood I had broken some of Canada’s 150-year-old laws. But that when you’re Indigenous there’s laws that sustained us for 6,000 and 7,000 years — the law to protect the land and water and things that sustain you.”Cunsolo says the Muskrat Falls protests hold a valuable lesson, not just to those involved.“I think that Muskrat Falls, if we step back from it and look at it and what is it’s significance in history in this area in Canada, I think one of the things that it’s teaching us is: If we really look at all the different pieces that happened and we start to tell this complex story, there are key learnings about grief and people coming together in a painful way, but also in a resilient way.”Flowers says it isn’t lost on her that the forces that threaten to take away her people’s river, traditional foods and way of life are the same ones trying to prevent her from resisting.“The government has historically and continually come into our land, into this land, without proper consultation, and taken what they wanted without giving anything back,” she says.“There’s oppression and suppression, and people are stripped of their rights and they can’t stand up unless there’s force,” she says. “And that’s what I felt like I came to; when I laid on the ground those many times, I said to hell with it — somebody has to do this. We have to take the stand because otherwise what do we have left?”APTN reached out to Nalcor Energy, Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball and RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki for this story, but none granted an on camera interview before the story went to [email protected]@justinbrakenews Justin BrakeAPTN News Sunday Marjorie Flowers doesn’t consider herself a criminal.But in July of 2017 she was arrested, put on a plane, and flown more than a thousand kilometres away from her family and community in Labrador to St. John’s, where she spent 10 days in a maximum security men’s prison.When she returned home, she spent another 30 days under house arrest.Her crime? Refusing to promise a judge she would stay away from the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project site, which she and dozens of others occupied in the fall of 2016 in a last resort effort to protect their water, traditional foods and way of life from projected methylmercury contamination.The 51-year-old Inuk mother, teacher and land protector will appear in court in June to respond to civil and criminal charges for violating an injunction granted to the crown corporation building the dam in order to keep land protectors and protestors away from the site. Flowers says she will plead not guilty to the charges.Marjorie Flowers says she’s been arrested five time for resisting Muskrat Falls, but has no choice if she wants to protect her traditional foods and way of life.Flowers’ lawyer Mark Gruchy represents about two dozen people who face charges related to the Muskrat Falls protests. Most of them are Indigenous.He says his clients feel “very morally justified in what they’re doing, and in fact felt compelled in many instances to be involved in this issue the way they were.”Gruchy says the injunction and subsequent criminalization of Indigenous people defending their land, food, and way of life were avoidable.“You have the normal operation of the justice system colliding with a very social complex issue which ought to be dealt with on a political level and never should have got here.”Indigenous people arrested and jailed for defending their lands and waters. It’s a story that plays out time and again across Canada.Experiencing ‘ecological grief’But research out of Labrador is challenging the narrative of the “angry Indigenous protestor” often spun by police, governments, corporations, and media.Ashlee Cunsolo is director of Memorial University’s Labrador Institute in Happy Valley-Goose Bay.She has researched the impacts of climate change on Inuit communities in Nunatsiavut and found that many facing a loss of access to traditional hunting grounds and cultural practices fundamental to their well-being and identity are experiencing what she calls “ecological grief”.Cunsolo describes ecological grief as “grief that’s in response to a change to a beloved homeland or environment or ecosystem.”“Being out on the land and feeling their ancestors there, and feeling those memories, and suddenly being cut off from that, not only cuts you off from the experience as an individual but cuts you from that tie of ancestral connection,” she says, describing the way Inuit in Nunatsiavut have been impacted by climate change. “So it was shaking people at a very foundational sort of psychological level, as well as an emotional level, as well as a physical level.Ashlee Cunsolo is director of Memorial University’s Labrador Institute in Happy Valley-Goose Bay.Cunsolo had just begun her new job as director of the Labrador Institute in the fall of 2016 when the Muskrat Falls protests intensified ahead of planned reservoir flooding.Inuit, Innu, and settler Labradorians united against the controversial dam, in part out of fear of losing access to traditional foods.That fear was corroborated by a peer-reviewed scientific study led by Harvard researchers that projected downstream communities would be exposed to unsafe levels of methylmercury through traditional foods like fish and seal unless vegetation and topsoil were removed from the dam’s reservoir prior to flooding.Cunsolo says the way people transformed their grief into action was unlike anything she had previously seen.“Feelings of anger or frustration weren’t at the fore; it was people wanting to come together to talk about the river, and to share stories about the river,” she recalls.“It wasn’t fighting against, it was fighting for, and feeling that commitment to all the people who had come before you and had loved that river, and wanting that love to continue forward, and that access to the river to continue forward.”There are known and acceptable ways to grieve and mourn the loss of a loved one, Cunsolo explains. But when humans face the loss of lands and other non-human entities that they have a deep spiritual connection with, there are no universal ways to grieve.“But when people come together to share in grief, and to share in strength related to that grief, that is a moving, profound, unstoppable force,” she says.Cunsolo noticed that after land protectors breached a gate at the Muskrat Falls site on Oct. 22, 2016, and subsequently occupied the site, the corporation and police attempted to frame the protest as violent and to suggest the safety of workers on site had been compromised.“I think we saw this amazing thing play out in Muskrat Falls where people were almost trying to force a framing on it that was just assumed because it was a quote-unquote protest,” she says.“I don’t think that we necessarily know how to deal with [ecological grief] — in media, in court injunctions, in the legal system, in mitigation and adaptation strategies, in policy.”The peaceful occupation of Muskrat Falls continued for four days until Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball held a marathon meeting with Indigenous leaders and reached an agreement that included demands set out by land protectors.Policing Indigenous protestsWith the exception of nine arrests at a blockade days prior to the occupation, there was no major police intervention in the land protectors’ occupation of the site and no violent arrests of Indigenous people.But Flowers and others involved in the Muskrat Falls resistance say that since the occupation they’ve been followed, pulled over and approached by RCMP officers in Labrador.Denise Cole, who has been protesting Muskrat Falls since before the project’s inception, was charged with violating Nalcor’s injunction after she performed ceremony near the river.“This idea that rule of law, colonial law, has to be enforced at all cost — that’s sent a level of fear and trauma and knowing that your voice is not an important voice in the justice system at all.”Flowers says the repression she says she and others feel from the injunction and the RCMP’s enforcement of it makes them feel like they “couldn’t even breathe.“I felt like I was losing my breath, because of the power from the outside, from the colonialism—the government, the corporation itself, the law enforcers. Everything was onside.“It makes me want to scream my head off. The oppression is just so present. And there’s nothing—not a thing—I can do about it. I feel like we’re just kind of like these plastic bottles on these big waves in the ocean. We don’t have any control. We just get bounced around, into court, back out of court.”She says she sees local law enforcement as “puppets that have to do their work,” but at the same time, they’ve caused her a lot of stress.“It was starting to affect my work. It was affecting my relationship. It was affecting everything. I was feeling a lot of anxiety from it because I felt like I couldn’t go outside my house. I couldn’t go to the dental office — there was a cop behind me [while I was] making an appointment.”Shiri Pasternak, an Assistant Professor of Criminology at Ryerson University, says what’s happening to land protectors in Labrador is playing out with other resource development projects on Indigenous lands across Canada, where corporations are increasingly turning to courts for injunctions when Indigenous land and water protectors threaten corporate profits.“In order to justify, in order to authorize the RCMP and police forces to enforce [Canada’s] and these companies’ access to Indigenous lands, they need to secure legal authority, and they do that through the injunction,” she explains.She says the RCMP and other police forces often surveil, follow or approach Indigenous people who defend their land — tactics collectively referred to as “soft policing”.“Rather than looking like violent repression they work in more covert and subtle ways in terms of letting people know they’re being watched in the hopes that people will self-police not to get involved in things because they’re intimidated.”Jeffrey Monaghan, an Assistant Professor of Criminology at Carleton University, recently co-authored a new book with his colleague Andy Crosby called “Policing Indigenous Movements.”In it, the authors disclose RCMP documents obtained through access to information legislation that shows the national police force operating in what Monaghan calls a “conservative culture” in how they understand and treat Indigenous land and water protectors.Those documents show RCMP referring to Indigenous people resisting Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline in British Columbia as “violent extremists,” and the entire Mi’kmaq-led movement to stop shale gas exploration in New Brunswick as a “violent extremist anti-fracking movement.”Watch Part 1 of Justin’s story on Ecological Grief.last_img read more

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Oz police raid properties linked to New Zealand terror suspect

first_imgMelbourne: Australian counter-terrorism police on Monday searched two homes linked to the family members of the gunman accused of killing 50 people at two mosques in Christchurch to obtain material that may assist New Zealand Police in their investigation into the terror attack. The attacker, identified by authorities as Australia-born Brenton Tarrant, 28, targeted immigrants during Friday prayers. Witnesses said victims were shot at close range. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USHe was arrested shortly after entering two mosques —Masjid Al Noor and Linwood – with high-powered weapons and shooting dead 50 people, including five Indians. The New South Wales (NSW) Joint Counter Terrorism Team on Monday raided two properties on the state’s mid-north coast. One of the properties being searched belongs to Sharon Tarrant, the mother of the attacker. ”Around 8.30 this morning (local time) officers from the NSW JCTT executed a search warrant at a home in the town of Sandy Beach, near Coffs Harbour. A short time later, a second search warrant was executed at another home in Lawrence near Maclean,” the statement said. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential polls”The primary aim of the activity is to formally obtain material that may assist New Zealand Police in their ongoing investigation,” it said adding “the family of the Australian man arrested in Christchurch continues to assist police with their inquiries.” Police further assured the community that that there was no information to suggest a current or impending threat related to this search warrants. The NSW JCTT comprises representatives from the Australian Federal Police, NSW Police Force, the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) and the NSW Crime Commission. In an interview with Nine News, Tarrant’s family expressed shock and apologised for his role in the shooting. His uncle, Terry Fitzgerald, mourned the victims in Christchurch. “We are so sorry for the families over there, for the dead and injured,” he said. His grandmother, Marie Fitzgerald, told reporters she could not fathom how “somebody in our family would do anything like this . The 81-year-old said her grandson was “obviously not of sound mind . The family had dinner with Tarrant 12 months ago for his sister’s birthday in Grafton. Tarrant, a self-avowed white supremacist, lived in Grafton, 500km northwest of Sydney, where he worked as a personal trainer at Big River Gym. He moved to the New Zealand city of Dunedin at some point in the last two or three years. Tarrant did not request bail during a brief court appearance on Saturday and will next appear on April 5. He has been charged with one count of murder but further charges are expected. Australian Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton defended the ASIO and the Australian Federal Police against suggestions they had failed to identify the danger Tarrant posed. He said Monday that Tarrant had spent only 45 days in Australia over the past three years and was not on any terror watch lists. His social media ravings were missed because of the massive amount of digital traffic which has to be monitored. “There is only so much content that can be covered, assessed and analysed by ASIO and other partner agencies,” said Dutton. He also rejected claims the security authorities were only focused on Islamic terrorists, ignoring right-wing extremists. Dutton said Australia’s security agencies are very concerned about retaliatory or copycat attacks in the wake of the Christchurch terror attack. Tarrant’s travels through Europe, Turkey and Asia are now being examined in detail, in part to see if he had any overseas help in carrying out the massacre.last_img read more

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