Reasonable gun regs block by NRA

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The NRA is the strongest lobby group in the United States by buying votes from elected representatives and threatening reprisals against those politicians out of step. Almost every sensible gun regulation (like restricting gun ownership from those on the no-fly list) is opposed by this extreme stand against common-sense gun control measures.This may eventually cause a strong backlash severely restricting all gun owners.Does the Second Amendment, written in the age of muskets, really mean that every civilian should be able to own all of the weapons necessary to fight against today’s government troops? Would any AR-15 high-capacity, high-volume owner or group of owners be able to competitively fight against one of today’s Army or Marine infantry squads — which have the support of tanks, helicopter gunships, artillery, fixed-wing planes and all the other high-tech weaponry? Of course not.So does that mean the Second Amendment allows civilian ownership of full-auto machine guns, tanks, artillery, helicopter and fixed-wing gunships? No.Stephen AndersonCharltonMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsPolice: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation The biggest threat to civilian ownership of guns for target shooting, hunting and self defense is the National Rifle Association (NRA). Yes, that’s right, the NRA. Here’s why. The NRA leadership, instead of representing America’s gun owners, is primarily representing gun, ammo, and after-market gun manufacturers in a no-holds-barred shutdown of any thoughtful gun regulation.last_img read more

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Manchester City, Chelsea share spoils in 3-3 WSL thriller

first_imgRelatedPosts Fulham keen on Lookman loan deal Ighalo: My best moment as ‘Red Devil’ Mane double eases Liverpool to win over 10-man Chelsea Leaders Manchester City and second-placed Chelsea shared the spoils in a pulsating 3-3 draw in an FA Women’s Super League clash on Sunday, which saw spectacular goals from six different scorers. Manchester City stay top of the table with 40 points after 16 games, while Chelsea maintained their unbeaten record in the league. They remain a point behind with a game in hand over their title rivals. Ellen White gave Manchester City the lead in the 22nd minute with a close-range effort. But midfielder So-Yun Ji put Chelsea level six minutes before the break with a deflected shot from distance. Georgia Stanway put Manchester City back in front with a superb breakaway goal on the hour mark. But, again, Chelsea came back as goalkeeper Ellie Roebuck could not keep out Magdalena Eriksson’s close-range header eight minutes later. Stanway then had a penalty kick saved before Beth England’s long-distance pile-driver put Chelsea ahead for the first time. This time it was Manchester City who dug deep to level as Hemp held off Maren Mjelde to score the final goal of a thrilling game and secure a valuable point. At the other end of the table, Ebony Salmon’s goal 15 minutes from time gave Bristol City a 1-0 away win over Birmingham City. The slim win moved them up to 10th in the table. Manchester United scored an impressive 3-2 win away to Everton. A Rianna Dean penalty kick gave Tottenham Hotspur a 1-0 win over Brighton & Hove Albion, who had Lea Le Garrec sent off in the first half for two yellow cards. In Sunday’s late kick-off fixture, West Ham’s Adriana Leon and Martha Thomas and Liverpool’s Rachel Furness each netted a brace of goals. The goals helped the Hammers to comfortably beat bottom side Liverpool 4-2 at home. Reuters/NAN.Tags: ChelseaEvertonManchester CityManchester UnitedWomen’s Super Leaguelast_img read more

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Women trying not to overlook Huskies

first_imgOne of the most debilitating blows a team can suffer during its season is a loss to any team to which, on paper, they should never lose. Thus far this year, Wisconsin has evaded any let down, only losing to Minnesota and Minnesota-Duluth, two of the most talented and top ranked teams in the country.For the Badgers to remain towards the top of the national rankings, they likely need to continue that trend of beating up on the lowly.Wisconsin heads into the final series before the holidays still atop the conference (14-2, 10-2 WCHA) and second in the national polls against St. Cloud State (0-14-1, 0-11-1 WCHA), a group that has yet to tally its first outright win this season.St. Cloud State’s poor record may exude inferiority, but like most WCHA teams, the Huskies boast a formidable goaltender in senior Ashley Nixon, who beat Minnesota-Duluth last weekend in a shootout and was named this week’s WCHA woman of the week.“She can be a talented goalie on any given night so we can’t take them lightly,” junior winger Carolyne Prevost said.However, Wisconsin has encountered a fair share of tough net minders this season: Zuzana Tomcikova from Bemidji State, who put up a whopping 41 saves against the Badgers back in October, and Minnesota’s Nooray Raty, who started for the Finnish Olympic team last year.The experience against some of the toughest goaltenders in the country has provided the Badgers with a proven formula for how to put the puck into the back of the net.“Like a lot of good goaltenders you move their eyes, you create tip-ins, you create rebounds and give yourself more opportunities to score goals. That’s what you need to do,” head coach Mark Johnson said.Unfortunately for Nixon and St. Cloud State, however, after losing several key scorers from last year’s squad, the offense has not matched the premier goaltending. The Huskies have only mustered 1.08 goals per game this season, worst in the WCHA.But for Johnson, the poor record and unflattering statistics are not reasons enough to take any team lightly, especially a team that is playing better regardless of where they sit in the standings.“They beat Duluth in a shootout on Friday night, so obviously you don’t look at their win loss record. You look at how they are playing right now and obviously they must have put together a pretty good game. Whether we’re playing up there or whether we’re playing somebody else you’ve got to be concerned,” Johnson said.The Badgers, on the other hand continue to lead the league in goals per game with 4.42, almost a full goal more than any other team in the WCHA (Minnesota-Duluth 3.50) and third in goals allowed per game with 2.33, only behind Minnesota-Duluth and Bemidji State.But even with the intimidating stats, an impressive record and a top national ranking, Wisconsin can’t overlook any team, even one without an outright victory on the season.“I try not to think about that at all, I take each game like it’s the first game of the season. Our team knows that these two games are very important before Christmas Break and everyone’s going to come ready to play,” senior defenseman Geena Prough said.Though, several times over the course of this season, the Badgers have entered games as the heavy favorite and did not give their best effort, which allowed for tighter finishes with teams they should have handled with ease.Prough and the rest of her teammates understand that letting down against any opponent in the WCHA is a mistake.“We have to play a full 60 minutes and we have to work hard every shift and not quit until we get the win at the end,” Prough said.last_img read more

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Martin Lycka: Us versus Them – psychology of gambling regulation

first_img TVBET passes GLI test for five live games in Malta and Italy August 25, 2020 Share Mateusz Juroszek – Non-stop STS will expand amid industry disruptions August 12, 2020 Related Articles Submit StumbleUpon Share Martin Lycka – GVCIn the fourth of a series of columns on international gambling legislation, GVC Holdings Director of Regulatory Affairs Martin Lycka debates the antagonistic relationship that can develop between the regulator and the industry.__________________Operators v. Regulators, undoubtedly a top billing in the industry nowadays. Just pause and think how many times in recent past you have bumped into an industry press article spelling out what one ‘team’ thinks about the other.Ups and downs, ebbs and flows; it’s pictured as a true love-hate relationship of a Rimmer and Lister nature (as pictured), Brianne of Tarth and Jaime Lannister-like acrimony and Han-and-Leiasque proportions.The truth is though that just like two Sunday league squads that meet every weekend to kick a ball around no matter the weather, the two ‘teams’ in the billing of this feature need each other because otherwise there would be no regulatory game.Despite the clear need to work together, with an ultimate view to protecting the customers, the frequency of use of the word ‘them’, as in ‘them, the gambling regulators’, has gone through the roof.“Speak to them, we need to sort this out,” is a staple phrase everyone who works in a regulatory, licensing or compliance function has on their plate on a daily basis. That tiny little word ‘them’ gives an impression that there is an invisible hand, or a Deus ex Machina if you will, that will creep in from its usual shadowy habitat and provide answers to all unresolved questions and persistent mysteries. That same word further fuels the perceived, but not necessarily substantiated, divide between the gatekeepers of the promised land of regulated gambling and those who aspire to reach that land. The never-ending regulatory debate has in many instances been befallen by an ‘us v. them’ mentality at both ends of the field, which in my view is no good.Let’s now have a look at what I called the regulatory game from a psychological perspective:Regulation is a process that starts with legislative ideas that are progressively being morphed into draft documents frequently put forward for public consultation – this is where the aforesaid creepy feeling of divide and misunderstanding sneaks in. Opening a freshly baked piece of draft gambling regulation is in many minds associated with the vision of Forrest Gump’s mother of life as a box of chocolates where you never know what you’re gonna get. What products will be permitted; which ones will be left behind? What are the product restrictions; what are the technical requirements? How much will it all cost; did ‘they’ pick an appropriate tax base..? You know the score.External factors such as politics, cultural traditions or the current state of a given economy are also thrown into the mix. This feeds into the end product of a set of rules that will govern the future regulated market in question. Is the regulation always perfect? Of course not, but we’ve got to work with what we’ve got and make the most of it.Now the regulation is in place it’s time to apply for a licence. My friends, you may want to “fasten your seatbelts, it’s going to be a bumpy ride”. Licence applications may turn out to be vertigo and hallucination-inducing processes, taking everyone involved to the brink of insanity, if not beyond. It is encapsulated by mad dashes toward the line, moving goalposts, races against time both at the operators’ and at the regulators’ end peppered with prisoner’s dilemma-like games where both sides try to second guess each other.There are a lot of potential ‘Houston, we’ve have a problem’ moments where documents are missing or are at risk of not arriving on time; moments that call for crazy solutions such as flying documents from Malta to Germany via Moscow (this is not an urban myth; this had to be done once upon a time).All this would lead a sane person to stop and ask: “Why so serious?” And just when you think you can’t go on shoving round pegs into square holes, your efforts are rewarded and a licence is granted. It’s a stressful way to instigate the “beginning of a beautiful friendship”.What next? Compliance. Now, the two sides of the divide have struck up “the beautiful friendship”, they need to work on it and make it grow; forget “us and them”, we are in this together because the customer demands it. This naturally requires a lot of mutual respect and understanding, including understanding of cultural idiosyncrasies, because so much has been invested that neither side can simply afford to ‘lose that guy in 10 days’. If that happened then someone might be inclined to exert a Jerry Maguire level of pressure and ask for ‘the money to be shown’.Bearing all this in mind, I would suggest that the most appropriate form of co-existence of operators and regulators in the field of gambling is a Bridge-like partnership. This would see the two partners having to work together, not always with all cards on the table, to defend against the hands of the opposing team players, in this case formed by unlicensed operators and criminals who seek to exploit the system. It is by defeating those ‘tricks’ that the industry and regulators should come together and put and end to the confrontational ‘us and them’ relationship.Martin Lycka is Director of Regulatory Affairs at GVC Group. Before that he spent nearly ten years at Paddy Power Betfair working on international markets. Views expressed are personal and not necessarily those of GVC Group. MoneyMatrix boosts wire transfer options by integrating Klarna’s Sofort August 24, 2020last_img read more

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