Wildfires and Housing: Knowing the Risks

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Wildfires and Housing: Knowing the Risks  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Damage Disaster wildfire 2019-09-12 Seth Welborn in Daily Dose, Featured, Loss Mitigation, News The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Global Fears Spark Increase in Mortgage Rates Next: Foreclosure Activity’s Ups and Downs The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago About Author: Seth Welborn According to data from CoreLogic, 2004 was the first time over 8 million acres burned in one year. During the next 14 years, more than 8 million acres burned annually another eight times, making nine of the last 14 years the highest annual totals of burned wildfire acreage. After several years of these record-breaking wildfires, The 2019 CoreLogic Wildfire Risk Report analyzed properties at risk of damage from wildfires in the United States.CoreLogic’s study revealed not only a continuation of fires and associated destruction in the United States but an escalation of these events. Based on an analysis by CoreLogic for 2019, there are 775,654 residential properties at extreme risk of wildfire damage in the 13 Western states, with a reconstruction cost value (RCV) of just over $221 billion.Due to both their larger geographic size and large populations, California and Texas lead the United States in the number of residences and RCV in the high- and extreme-risk categories. Both states contain fuels and terrain that contribute to higher risk classifications and have population centers near high-risk areas. Colorado, which has experienced several record-setting fires since 2010, ranks third for the number of homes in both the high and extreme categories. While other states tend to have fewer properties, of the remaining 10 states, half have more than 50,000 residences in the high- and extreme-risk categories combined.California, however, cannot be topped when it comes to wildfire devastation over the past two years. In 2017, California’s wildfires, including the Tubbs Fire and the Thomas Fire dwarfed previous records for both the size of the fires and the amount of destruction. In 2018, new records were set again for both categories, along with the number of deaths for a single wildfire event, the Camp Fire.“When considering the future of wildfire risk in the Western United States, it will likely expand to more homes and result in the greater property losses than we have seen in the past,” said CoreLogic. “As unfortunate as it sounds, there are other communities similar to Paradise where fuels are present and homes are at risk. It only requires the right weather conditions and an errant spark to create the next unwanted record.” Tagged with: Damage Disaster wildfirecenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago September 12, 2019 1,169 Views Wildfires and Housing: Knowing the Risks Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

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Provost creates committee to alter Title IX procedures to comply with federal law

first_imgA committee will advise the Office of General Council to permanently adapt the University’s Title IX regulations in order to comply with the new federal regulations declared in May 2020 by the U.S. Department of Education, provost Marie Lynn Miranda announced in an email Wednesday.Vice president and associate provost for faculty affairs Maura Ryan will serve as chair. Other members of the committee were elected by Academic Council or appointed by Miranda.The Academic Council approved temporary measures to bring the University into compliance with the new regulations on Aug. 10.“The adopted changes removed the regulatory Title IX matters from Article IV/Section 9 of the Academic Articles and placed them within the Procedures for Resolving Concerns of Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, and Other Sex-Based Misconduct,” Miranda said.According to the meeting minutes, the University required changes in two areas to comply with the federal regulations. The University needed to use one standard of evidence across all cases and appeals, “regardless of who the complainant and respondent are.”While almost all hearings had used a preponderance of evidence standard, faculty members may request a hearing and appeal under a clear and convincing standard if a violation results in a severe sanction.The University was also required to change their regulations to “provide both complainants and respondents with equivalent appeal opportunities and processes.”In the past, the same appeal procedure was not granted to complainant’s when the respondent was a faculty member.The temporary measures applied the preponderance of evidence to all cases, and determined that the severe sanctions appeal process would “no longer apply to sexual harassment cases.”The proposal would only be in place for the 2020 fall semester, and required more significant changes in the long-term, Miranda said. Without further action by the Academic Council, the temporary measures will revert to the previous standards on Nov. 20 2020.The new committee, the Office of General Counsel and the Office of Institutional Equity will review proposed permanent changes to the Title IX policies.Miranda asked the committee to consider a number of questions including how the changes in the evidentiary standards may effect decisions to report or “participate in investigations of sexual harassment and sexual assault allegations.”Miranda said the committee should address all of the following questions: “How do our procedures for addressing Title IX and other sex-based misconduct best protect due process across all parties, consistent with federal regulations? What are the features of an appeal process that is equitable across all parties? How do our policies and procedures reflect the protections and responsibilities of academic freedom?”Notre Dame will also determine the changes other universities have chosen to help in the decision making. All students, faculty and staff may submit comments and questions to [email protected], and the committee will hold public presentations in order to provide the University community with updates.Tags: Office of General Counsel, Provost Marie Lynn Miranda, Title IXlast_img read more

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Snakebite!

first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of GeorgiaThere was no mistaking the wound on Ashley’s ankle. It was the bite of a venomous snake.I’d looked at drawings of snakebite wounds in first aid books many times and often wondered if a venomous snake bite actually looked the way it was depicted.After Tuesday night, I no longer have to wonder. I know.My daughter, Lindsay, and her friends, Hurston, Phillip, and Ashley, had just returned to our house after spending the day at an amusement park.It was 10 p.m. and Ashley and Phillip were getting into his car to head home. It was parked off our driveway, near a bed of liriope. Suddenly, Ashley screamed and at that moment, a carefree day of fun ended.“Ashley just got bit by a snake!” Phillip cried as he helped Ashley back into our house and onto a chair in the den. Ashley was in obvious pain and understandably very frightened. It took only one look at her ankle to know this was not the work of a harmless snake.Ashley knew, too.“It was probably a copperhead” I said, “I’ve killed two in the yard this summer.”Copperheads are the least dangerous of the venomous snakes in Georgia and that’s just what I told Ashley.“If it was a copperhead that bit you, then you’ll be all right,” I assured her. “Just keep your foot lower than your heart and let’s get you to the hospital.”I hoped I was right.Medical doctors who have experience with bites of venomous snakes of the United States do not completely agree on the details of first-aid treatment of snake bites. What they do agree on is what to do if you are bitten: go to the nearest medical facility immediately, stay calm, and identify the snake if you can do so easily, without putting yourself at risk or wasting valuable time.On the way to the hospital I asked Ashley about her family and the college she attends. Our conversation helped take her mind off the bite and by the time we got to the emergency room she was noticeably calmer.The universally accepted treatment for serious snake bites is antivenin or “antivenom” as it is sometimes called. But since we did not actually see the snake, and perhaps because I told the emergency room physician the snake was probably a copperhead, the physician chose to simply monitor Ashley’s reaction to the bite.I’m curious by nature and wondered how big the snake was that left those fang wounds in Ashley’s ankle. I wondered if there was a correlation between the distance between themand the body length of the snake.So I measured the distance between the fang wounds with a tongue depressor. They were on either side of the depressor. That made them about 18-19 millimeters apart. While in the emergency room waiting on her parents to arrive, Ashley said, “My mother’s going to kill me.”“She’s going to kill you because you got bitten by a snake?” I asked in disbelief. “No,” Ashley answered, “She’s going to kill me because I skipped classes today to go to Six Flags!”Ashley recovered very well and was dismissed from the hospital the next day.Taking my tongue depressor measurements one step further, I concluded the snake that bit Ashley was about three feet long. That’s pretty big for a copperhead. All I know is, I’m staying away from that liriope. (Mike Isbell is the Heard County Extension coordinator with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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