Lilian Hardy, Emma Moore & Éva-Marie Saffrey Join London’s Matilda

first_imgEmma Moore, Abbie Vena, Éva-Marie Saffrey & Lilian Hardy(Photo: Helen Maybanks) Lilian Hardy, Emma Moore and Éva-Marie Saffrey are set to join Abbie Vena in London’s Matilda beginning on March 14; as with other productions of the Tim Minchin-scored musical, the four will alternate playing the titular role at the Cambridge Theatre.Matilda’s current cast includes Michael Begley as Mr Wormwood, Miria Parvin as Miss Honey and Rebecca Thornhill who plays Mrs Wormwood. The rest of the adult cast features Richard Astbury, Oliver Brooks, Collette Coleman, Maria Graciano, Elliot Harper, Daniel Hope, Daniel Ioannou, Kate Kenrick, Katie Lee, Fergal McGoff, Tom Muggeridge, Matthew Rowland, Matthew Serafini, Biancha Szynal, Laura Tyrer and Sharlene Whyte.The pint-sized powerhouses that make up Matilda’s child cast include Mylo Burton-Mays, Kira Caple, Jessica Chalmers, Hari Coles, Archie Durrant, Charlotte Fallart, Regan Garcia, Ptolemy Gidney, Aiyana Goodfellow, Sebastian Harry, Angelina Li, Tilda Marriage Massey, Ben Robinson, Tori Louise Ryan, Kacy O’Sullivan, Nicholas Antoniou-Tibbitts, Max Brophy, Olivia Calladine-Smith, Elena Cervesi, Miles Harcombe, Michael Hawkins, Sam Jennings, Craig Noakes, Tia Palamathanan and Scarlett Wennink.What better way to settle in to a new stage gig than with a trapeze lesson? Watch the video below to see Matilda’s fab four learn the trapeze from Miss Trunchbull (a.k.a. Craige Els). They also talk about their favorite junk food (chips, obvi) and more! View Commentslast_img read more

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Students organize march against racial profiling

first_imgA group of graduate students from the School of Social Work organized a march to mobilize the Los Angeles region for the passage of the End Racial Profiling Act of 2015, which is currently sitting in both houses of Congress.With about 100 people in attendance, the march started at USC Hybrid High and ended at the Federal Court Building in downtown Los Angeles.The goal of the march, which took place on April 19, was to create awareness for ERPA. Though some form of the act has been introduced to Congress since the Bush administration, the bill has never actually been up for a vote.“The End Racial Profiling Act of 2015 calls for a clear definition of racial discriminatory practices involving racial profiling at all levels,” said Omar Avila, a first-year graduate student studying social work and one of the main organizers of this movement, in an email to the Daily Trojan. “It also calls for federal prohibition of racial profiling, mandates collection of data involving racial biases, provides funding for retraining of officers, and most importantly, it holds law enforcement accountable.”The march featured a variety of speakers, including Cheryl Dorsey, a retired LAPD sergeant and other notable community members.“It grew from the classroom to the streets,” said Caitlin Freige, a first-year graduate student studying social work. “We wanted to be visible of what we were studying and researching [to be visible].”Avila said he and his team had set up tables at the end of the march to register people to vote so their voices could be heard. He said that the group formed a petition that they plan to send to members of Congress showing the mass support in favor of the legislation.Freige said this issue has always been passion of hers.“I grew up in Los Angeles in 1992 during the Los Angeles riots,” Freige said. “So I watched my dad leave and I wasn’t sure if he’s going to come home. I had first-hand experience with the civil unrest due to racial profiling and race-initiated violence in general.”The team is now working on a petition to present in front of Congress.According to Joseph DiMartino, a first-year graduate student of social work, the group is hoping to build support among students at USC to help get this act passed. He said the first step is to educate students about the bill and what it would actually do.“This whole idea of color blindness and not seeing that our diversity is almost a new form of racism and especially with law enforcement and them saying that there is no racial profiling happening is very skewed,” DiMartino said.Freige said she wants to see more students involved in this movement on campus.“We have a lot of great people here that could really [impact] this movement so I just want to see everyone out with us,” Freige said.Avila said he enjoyed seeing all the support during the march.“It was a good experience not only [to march] downtown, but [also] to see the support that people were giving us. Our next step is continuing to get signatures for our petition so we could [raise] more awareness,” Avila said.last_img read more

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