Free webinar offers information on immigration law

first_img By Jaine Treadwell Skip Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits “This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in the immigration law to find our more detailed information,” Lyons said. “It will also be resourceful for business owners, supervisors and our local farmers.“The new immigration law affects a variety of different groups in supervisory capacities, including human resource directors.”The webinar will be conducted by Thomas Eden, a labor law expert with Capell & Howard law firm. The webinar may also be watched on home or office computers by going to http://www.aces.edu/go/195. Participants may connect at any time but will not see content until about 9:45 a.m. on Friday. No audio will be heard until the program begins at 10 a.m.Lyons said the webinar will be archived so that those who are not able to view it live will be able to view it at a later time. The archive location is http://www.aces.edu/go/195 and will be available shortly after the live presentation concludes.For more information, contact Lyons at 334-566-0985. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Latest Stories By The Penny Hoarder Free webinar offers information on immigration law Email the author Book Nook to reopen The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… “Mr. Eden will talk about the things that can and cannot be done under the new immigration law,” Lyons said. “It is important that farmers and others who employ immigrants understand their roles and responsibilities in complying with the new law.”The law contains provisions with stiff fines and penalties so it is very important for those who employ immigrants to understand the law and how it applies to them, Lyons said.The webinar will also have information on the E-Verify enrollment process and Form 1-9 Supervisor Training and Tips.The webinar will originate at the Alabama Cooperative Extension System’s headquarters in Auburn. The technology will allow the sponsoring agencies to reach many of the people most impacted by the new law. The Pike County Extension Office is the local host for a webinar on the state’s new immigration law this is being sponsored by the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries and the Alabama Cooperative Extension SystemThe webinar will be from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. on Friday at the Pike County Extension Office at 306 South Three Notch Street in Troy.Grant Lyons, Pike County Extension coordinator, said the public will be able to view the immigration webinar on a large screen television at the Extension office. Print Article Published 10:58 pm Tuesday, October 11, 2011 Sponsored Content Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day You Might Like Ribbons and rides Pike County fair opens today The Pike County Fair opens tonight with a brand new midway that is sure to… read more Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Charles blames Galileo for scientific greed

first_imgHRH Prince Charles spoke at the Sheldonian Theatre on Wednesday, on ‘Islam and the Environment.’ His lecture focussed on what he described as the “division between humanity and nature”, which is caused by “global industrialisation.” The lecture was organised by the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies, of which the Prince is patron, to celebrate its 25th anniversary.Prince Charles said that “the Islamic world is a custodian…a priceless gift to the rest of world.” He made a plea to Islamic scholars, artists, teachers and engineers to fuse the spiritual and practical worlds, on the model of The Prince’s School of Traditional Arts. The Prince, whose income last year was just over £19 million, said “we are clearly living beyond our means.”He argued that the current economic and environmental crisis is the result of a deeper crisis of the soul.“We need a recovery of the soul to the mainstream of our thinking. Only the sacred traditions have the capacity to do this”, he said.The Prince of Wales blamed a lack of belief in the soul for environmental problems, and said that the planet will not be able to sustain a population likely to rise to 9 billion in 40 years.He said that it was “baffling” that so many scientists claimed to have faith in God, and yet science was till used in a “damaging” way to exploit the natural world.Prince Charles even criticised the work of Galileo. Condemning the drive for profit behind scientific research, he said, “This imbalance, where mechanistic thinking is so predominant, goes back at least to Galileo’s assertion that there is nothing in nature but quantity and motion.”last_img read more

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Harvard Innovation Labs announces alumni-led ventures

first_imgThe Harvard Innovation Labs announced that it has accepted 22 startups into the Launch Lab X GEO (LLX GEO) accelerator, a nine-month program designed to bring together Harvard alumni-led ventures from around the world and help them build sustainable, disruptive businesses with real-world impact.“From making surgery safer for patients and healthcare providers, to turning restaurants into micro grocery stores, all of the ventures participating in this year’s Launch Lab X GEO cohort have demonstrated incredible ingenuity in creating solutions that have the potential to improve millions of people’s lives,” said Matt Segneri, Bruce and Bridgitt Evans Executive Director of the Harvard Innovation Labs. “The entire Harvard Innovation Labs team, along with our global network of advisors and experts, is thrilled to be working with each venture as they take the next big steps in refining their products and services, scaling their teams, and building their customer bases.”Since announcing the LLX GEO accelerator in June, the Harvard Innovation Labs received 176 applications from alumni-led ventures around the world. The 22 ventures accepted into the program come from seven countries and nine Harvard schools. Collectively, they are working on a range of products and services across more than 10 industries, including e-commerce, education technology, fashion, food and beverage, medical devices, public health, real estate, and more.“This is the first time that Harvard Innovation Labs has launched a global alumni accelerator, achieving a larger strategic goal to extend the reach of our programming beyond Boston,” said Thara Pillai, director of alumni engagement at the Harvard Innovation Labs. “Bringing together diverse perspectives will not only optimize our cohort’s learnings, but will also help the i-lab evolve and be more representative of the global community that is part of the Harvard ecosystem.”To learn more about the 22 ventures accepted into Launch Lab X GEO, visit the Harvard Innovation Labs website. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Winter Cover Crop Study

first_imgWayne County farmer Jonny Harris noticed long ago that feeding winter cover crops to his cattle improves their diet, his fields and his bottom line. He wanted to show other southeastern Georgia farmers they can reap the same benefits, but he knew he needed more evidence than decades of personal experience.“I understood that it was good, but we needed documentation. I couldn’t go to my neighbor and say if you use this as a forage cover crop, you can get this much production and market it for this much,” Harris said.SARE funding, UGA Extension supportSo, he applied for and was awarded a grant from the Southern Agriculture Research and Education Program and began partnering with University of Georgia Extension to conduct cover crop trials that would yield the data they needed. By the second of three years, the team has already begun to see convincing results.An economic analysis of Harris’ trials revealed that while forage cover crops can be costly to produce, their nutritional value provides a cost-effective option for farmers. “On a per acre basis, they are expensive. There’s no way of getting around that,” said UGA Extension Livestock Economist Curt Lacy. “But when you convert that cost to how much nutrition you get per acre in terms of total digestible nutrients and crude protein, then it’s very economical.”The cover crops they tested—grown on cultivated fields and harvested as baled silage—were a better value in terms of cost per pound of crude protein and total digestible nutrients than low-quality hay, corn, whole cottonseed and other feed options. Only high-quality hay was a better value.Cover crop supporterHarris’ Greenview Farms, in Screven, Ga., has been in his family since around 1860. It includes 2,800 acres of timberland, pasture for a herd of 1,000 cattle and cultivated fields of cotton, corn, soybeans and peanuts. He has been using winter cover crops on his pastures since the 1950s and on his cultivated fields for the last 10 years.The soils in Harris’ test plots have improved noticeably. Southeastern Georgia’s soils are sandy and low in organic matter, which means they do a bad job of holding water and plant nutrients. In the trials, the soil’s water-holding capacity has increased 15 to 20 percent, and soil organic matter has increased as much as 1 percent.“What’s really outstanding is the quality of the soil, and how it’s improving dramatically,” says UGA Forage Extension Specialist Dennis Hancock, who is working with Harris. “I can tell just by the dark, rich color.” The data they are collecting help document these changes.Richer soil, better yieldsAlong with soil quality, cotton yields also appear to be improving in the trials. In 2012, 1,600 pounds of lint per acre was harvested when cotton was planted after a cover crop of ryegrass, and 1,100 pounds per acre was harvested when no cover crop was used.In his trials, Harris planted 45-acre combinations of ryegrass, triticale and crimson clover, followed by a cotton crop. He fed his baled silage on farm and sold to dairy and beef farmers. One neighboring dairyman saw a 20 percent increase in milk production after just a few days of feeding his cows this nutrient-rich silage, Harris said.“Everything has been positive–the energy we’re able to produce from this grass, the way cattle are transferring those nutrients into meat or milk or whatever else the farmer needs,” he said. “We’re just seeing an abundance of positives.”For more information on SARE, see the website www.sare.org/.Andy Zieminski of SARE Outreach contributed to this article.last_img read more

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No deal with City – Pellegrini

first_img It has been reported that the Chilean has been lined up to succeed current City manager Roberto Mancini, whose position at the Etihad Stadium has come under the spotlight following a hugely disappointing season. According to reports, Mancini, whose team lost the FA Cup final to Wigan at the weekend, could even be sacked before the Blues take on Reading on Tuesday night. However, Pellegrini insists he has no deal in place with any club for next season and is currently focused only on trying to help Malaga secure a Europa League place. “I deny here and now being the new coach of Manchester City, I haven’t signed any agreement with anybody,” Pellegrini told Malaga’s official website after their goalless Primera Division draw with Sevilla. “I’ve been fortunate enough, and very proud, that every year the big clubs have shown an interest in me. I have an agreement with Malaga not to talk to anyone and nothing has been agreed with any other club. “I hope in the coming weeks that things will become a little clearer what is going to be the future here at this club.” Malaga have struggled with form since their heartbreaking Champions League quarter-final defeat by Borussia Dortmund, winning two of six Primera Division matches while losing three. Despite that, Malaga are still sixth in the league standings and will be hoping to stay there over the final two games of the season. Even if they do finish in sixth, though, they may not be playing in continental competition next season with a one-year ban from European football hanging over them. UEFA handed out the punishment in December due to the Spanish club’s outstanding debts, but the club are hoping for a reprieve. The former Real Madrid and Villarreal coach added of speculation about his future: “There are a lot of rumours. “The coaching team and players are focused on qualifying the team for Europe. Overcoming the trauma of being knocked out of the Champions League wasn’t easy, but we’re still hoping to qualify for the Europa League.” Malaga coach Manuel Pellegrini has denied having an agreement in place to become the next manager of Manchester City.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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Nzema Kotoko President, Mark Addo, is new GFA Vice President

first_imgThe Ghana Football Association’s Executive Council has chosen President of Nzema Kotoko Football Club, Mark Addo, to be the association’s new Vice-President.The decision was taken on Tuesday at the maiden meeting of the council after the October 25 elections in Accra.Per the new GFA statutes, the Vice-President of the association had to be chosen via an election from the new Executive Council which was a departure from the previous practice of appointing someone to assist the association’s President.During the election, Addo got 6 votes while Randy Abbey picked up 4 with Medeama board chairman, Dr. Tony Aubynn getting 1 vote.Who is Mark Addo?last_img read more

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