Bill Ukropina’s Holiday Lunch at the Rose Bowl Thrives Come Rain or Shine

first_imgHerbeautyRed Meat Is Dangerous And Here Is The ProofHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeauty Subscribe People Bill Ukropina’s Holiday Lunch at the Rose Bowl Thrives Come Rain or Shine By JOHN LAVITT Published on Monday, December 15, 2014 | 12:30 am Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Bill and Linan Ukropina. Photo credit: Dana P. BoutonBill Ukropina (r), John Naber (l) Legacy Connections. Photo Credit: John LavittEvery year for the past seven years, commercial real estate broker extraordinaire Bill Ukropina throws a holiday lunch at the Rose Bowl for friends & family, customers & guests. On Friday morning, December 12, despite the heavy rains the night before that seemed to be continuing on into the day, Bill Ukropina woke early in the morning, ready for another holiday fest. With Olympic gold medalist John Naber as his speaker and close to 300 on the guest list, the Executive Vice President of the Coldwell Banker Commercial Alliance Office in Glendale was certain it would be a wonderful day. Maybe a little wet, but still as wonderful as years before.Bill Ukropina Holiday Lunch, Brookside Clubhouse RestaurantThen it happened. Bill Ukropina got the phone call from the Rose Bowl grounds staff, informing him that the heavy rains had flooded the visitor’s locker room with two feet of water, mud and turf. As any successful man in the modern world, Bill Ukropina knows when crisis comes, it is never the time to panic.Rather, taking proactive action with the help of the Rose Bowl team, Bill Ukropina shifted the event to the Brookside Clubhouse Restaurant, barely a hop, skip and a jump from the original location. With an email blast handled by his team, the event was back on. After all, Bill Ukropina’s Annual Holiday Lunch at the Rose Bowl is known for being annual because it happens every year come rain or shine.With over 265 people in attendance and hosted by Bill Ukropina and his beautiful wife, Linan, the Holiday Lunch was a great success. Although the guests had to navigate a new small river rushing down Rosemont Avenue, they braved the elements to attend. By attending, the guests were rewarded with an inspired afternoon of first-class networking, delectable delights, and the words of a true Olympic champion.Pasadena resident John Naber achieved a perfect balance as the speaker by being both inspiring and funny. As a backstroke specialist, John Naber earned five Olympic medals in 1976, and was honored as the Nation’s outstanding amateur athlete. Later inducted into the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame, John Naber has had a successful post-athletic career as a network broadcaster and corporate speaker. John Naber focused his talk on the lessons of how to succeed that are detailed in his latest book “Awaken The Olympian Within.”As a charitable gesture, Bill Ukropina donated $10.00 for every guest who attended to “Legacy Connections,” the organization raising money for the Rose Bowl Renovation. In addition, he gave John Naber a very special gift by honoring him with an inscribed legacy brick that will forever be part of the new Rose Bowl main entrance. As described on the Legacy Connections website,  “The brick mosaic will be installed immediately in front of Gate A, the main entrance to the Rose Bowl Stadium.”Given the nature of a holiday gala where gifts are exchanged, Bill Ukropina wasn’t quite finished. Every attendee was given the opportunity to receive a free signed copy of John’s book, “Awaken the Olympian Within.” Given such an opportunity, there was quite a line, and John Naber signed a lot of books, but it was a lovely end to an amazing annual Pasadena event.About the AuthorGrowing up in New York City as a stutterer, John Lavitt embraced writing as a way to express himself when the words would not come. After graduating from Brown University, he lived on the Greek island of Patmos, studying with his mentor the late American poet Robert Lax. As a writer, John Lavitt’s published work includes several articles in Chicken Soup For The Soul volumes and poems in multiple poetry journals and compilations. Today, John Lavitt works at Open Interactive as the Director of Content Development. As a journalist, he is a Regular Contributor to The Fix where he writes investigative reports about the latest issues in the world of addiction and recovery. 5 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Top of the News center_img More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. 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FHA Amends Reverse Mortgage Rules

first_img FHA Amends Reverse Mortgage Rules  Print This Post Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Subscribe Home / Daily Dose / FHA Amends Reverse Mortgage Rules Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Previous: Ocwen Ready to Close on PHH Acquisition Next: Freedom Mortgage Ranks on Inc. 5000 List About Author: Seth Welborncenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago September 28, 2018 4,336 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Tagged with: FHA HUD Recerse Mortgage in Daily Dose, Featured, News, REO, Secondary Market Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Share 1Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) recently announced that it will begin requiring lenders originating new Home Equity Conversion Mortgages (HECMs), also known as reverse mortgages, to provide a second property appraisal under certain circumstances. According to the FHA, lenders must now provide a second independent property appraisal in cases where the Administration determines there may be inflated property valuations.The new requirement applies to case numbers assigned on or after October 1, 2018 through September 30, 2019. FHA will periodically review this guidance and, based on the results, may renew these after 2019.The FHA will perform a risk assessment of appraisals submitted for use in new HECM originations.  Based on the outcome of that assessment, FHA may require a second appraisal be obtained prior to approving the reverse mortgage for an insurance endorsement.Under the new policy, lenders must not approve or close a HECM before FHA has performed the collateral risk assessment and, if required, a second appraisal is obtained. Where a second appraisal is required by FHA, lenders must use the lower value of the two appraisals.The FHA states that this new appraisal validation policy will further reduce risks to FHA’s Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund (MMIF) and protect the health of the HECM program.The FHA notes that the financial soundness of FHA’s reverse mortgage program is contingent on an accurate determination of a property’s value and condition. The property value is used to determine the amount of equity that is available to the borrower and it is also used by FHA to determine the amount of insurance benefits paid to a mortgagee.Additionally, he Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and its paper titled “Reverse Mortgage Collateral: Undermaintenance or Overappraisal?” notes that the higher-than-expected losses in the HECM program can be attributed to optimistic estimates of collateral value driven by exaggerated property appraisals when the loan was originated.”The FHA’s letter to mortgagee’s can be found here. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago FHA HUD Recerse Mortgage 2018-09-28 Seth Welbornlast_img read more

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Athletes in Arms: Recovery in a world of pain

first_imgAt this current moment in time, I wish the Bucks were the biggest story coming out of Wisconsin. Instead, just two days ago, Jacob Blake, a Black man in Kenosha, was shot seven times in the back by police — a 45-minute drive from where I grew up.  So until this happens, focus will be on national reform, not a playoff series.  “When we take the court and represent Milwaukee and Wisconsin, we are expected to play at a high level, give maximum effort and hold each other accountable,” the Bucks’ statement read. “We hold ourselves to that standard, and in this moment, we are demanding the same from our lawmakers and law enforcement.” In the wake of the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and countless other Black Americans, backlash arose from several players in the league to whether they should be playing when the Black Lives Matter movement had an international spotlight. Now after another incident of police brutality, players have circled back to the same concern from early July.  With the absence of competition for the past five months, this void has been filled with an oversaturation of news regarding the election, the current global pandemic and protests for racial equality.  This leaves me wondering: Once I begin competing again for volleyball, will my priority have to be playing volleyball? Does this mean I have to sacrifice being an active participant in the fight for social justice? Is there a balance between the two despite the mental energy that each drains? All these questions apply, but with even more urgency, for Black athletes as they have to actively consider their priorities in tandem with their own community of family and friends.  Instead of seeing his next opponent in the playoffs as the biggest threat to be concerned about, a veteran star of the league sees police in the United States as the biggest threat. Even a man standing at 6-foot-9, 250 pounds and earning hundreds of millions of dollars a year still shares a common fear of police that many in the Black community face today.  After reading the Bucks’ statement on the situation following initial reactions, I hear echoes of the same principles that resonate in my own USC volleyball program. Across all levels of competition, from high school to professional, a central principle of teamwork is accountability. A team cannot function to its highest potential without its members holding themselves and each other accountable. In this moment, our government will not perform its highest duty of representing its people unless we hold it and ourselves accountable.  When I decided to join the Daily Trojan team, I thought that I would be able to use my status as a student-athlete at USC to write about how my peers in athletics have navigated the recent surge in the fight against racial injustice.  Speaking from my experience as a collegiate volleyball player, schoolwork always comes first with volleyball following close behind in terms of personal priorities. With the time, mental toughness and physical endurance needed to invest in these activities, this leaves little room for awareness of the larger world around me. About 12 hours after finishing the first draft of this column, I received a notification that the Bucks had not taken the court in their Game 5 matchup to protest the shooting of Blake. “Quite frankly it’s just fucked up in our community,” James said in a press conference after Monday’s Game 4 win over the Portland Trail Blazers. “And I said it, I know people get tired of hearing me say it, but we are scared as Black people in America. Black men, Black women, Black kids — we are terrified.”center_img “We shouldn’t have even [come] to this damn place, to be honest,” George Hill, a guard for the Milwaukee Bucks, said in a press conference Monday. “Coming here just took all the focal points off what the issues are. But we’re here. It is what it is. We can’t do anything from right here. But I think definitely when it all settles, some things need to be done.” With a strong 3-1 series lead over Portland, James would normally be concerned with his next opponent, the winner of the Houston Rockets and Oklahoma City Thunder matchup, who are both playing at the top of their games at the moment.  For my debut in this sports column, however, I felt the need to talk about a recent tragedy that hit too close to home.  Once the clock has expired and all the preparation has been done for the next game, how will their minds and bodies recover when they return to a world that is still in pain? I am originally from Milwaukee, Wis. I grew up going to Bucks, Brewers and Packers games. The Bucks currently are on the road to advancing in the NBA Playoffs with reigning league MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo, bringing loads of excitement to the city.  I was moved with immense pride by the leadership that my hometown team showed. My pride immediately grew even more as the Brewers followed suit, and eventually within the hour, the NBA had postponed every game that day to show solidarity with the players’ sentiments — all starting with the Bucks’ initial leadership. This widespread concern is all separate from the fact that the world is in the midst of a pandemic that has postponed collegiate sports across several major conferences, including the Pac-12. I cannot speak for every athlete; however, this absence of sports and national focus on injustices has altered my perception of where my priorities land at this moment in time. Going into the NBA bubble, racial injustice was already at the center of attention for the league as players put statements on the back of their jerseys, knelt for the national anthem in unity and most overtly, played on a court with “Black Lives Matter” written in large, bolded letters.  As the NBA wraps up the first round of playoffs, players would normally be dialed into finishing their respective series and looking forward to the next matchup. In light of current events, many star players, including LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers, shifted their attention to what happened in Wisconsin.  Americans have always found solace in sports, as it offers a distraction from the worries of life at home. For the average fan, watching a game may help them forget the pressures of their work and everyday life. For the player, the game is their work. After the final buzzer, muscles and bones are going to need recovery. Film will need to be studied and preparations begin for the next game.  Liam Schroeder is a junior writing about sports and social justice. He is also a middle blocker on the USC men’s volleyball team. His column, “Athletes in Arms,” runs every Thursday.last_img read more

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