Vendome Copper & Brass Works Makes Stills that Make Some of Your Favorite Spirits

first_img How to Make a Rum Old Fashioned A clock rings everyday at Vendome Copper & Brass Works in Louisville, Kentucky.At 3:30, the bell signals a hard day’s work is finished and the denim and leather clad workers line up to punch their time cards before heading off for the night.Aside from a digital clock on the wall in the workshop, there’s no indication these craftsman are working in 2017 as the products they work on have been a crucial piece to the distilling industry in Kentucky for more than a century. Today, Vendome’s stills can be found in distilleries across the globe, including major bourbon distillers like Buffalo Trace, Jim Beam and Wild Turkey.Vendome is housed in a mishmash of buildings on Franklin Street in Louisville, with the offices in an old 1830s row house, hinting at its age. Although the Vendome origin story stretches back into the 19th century, the company made its incorporation formal on April 1, 1912.The company was founded by Elmore Sherman Sr. and the company is still in the family, run today by its fourth generation, Tom and Mike Sherman. Elmore Sherman Sr.’s experience with copper spanned back to 1901 when he worked for the Louisville branch of Cincinnati-based Hoffman, Ahlers & Co., and before long he was head of the branch, before starting his own operation.Early customers included some in Kentucky, like J.T.S. Brown & Sons and E.H. Taylor Jr. & Sons, but also in Mexico, Panama and Burma. Stills weren’t made simply for spirit distillation either, nor are they today, as the fabricator began supply companies making products like creosote and turpentine.The company also services brewing, dairy and food and confectionary industries. Vendome saw its distillery business halt as Prohibition was enacted in 1918, by founder Elmore Sherman Sr. kept the operation alive.Eventually, with consolidation of distilleries, Vendome became one of the main suppliers for the distilling industry.“There were many distilleries before and after Prohibition and most of them were small,” said Tom Sherman, Vendome’s President. “Through consolidation starting after WWII they became the large distilleries and some companies like Vendome continued as their main equipment providers while others either ventured into other endeavors or went out of business.”The company boomed in the 1930s with the repeal of Prohibition and adapted with the demand of industrial alcohol during World War II. The company has made countless shifts throughout its history, including during the mid-20th century as other spirits came into popularity and bourbon declined.Once doing business mainly in Kentucky, by the 1970s, Vendome was shipping 90 percent of its products out of state. Vendome’s stills have gone all over the Americas, New Zealand, Australia, Europe and Asia.The shift continues today with the rise of small distilleries across the globe and Vendome continues to grow its offerings to producers in Kentucky and elsewhere. Sherman said the craft distillery market is incredibly important to the fabricator as new business floods in.As the company continues to grow and send its stills across the globe, it’s important the still manufacturer stays true to its roots. As stills vary in size, so too does the price and the time it takes to complete them. But each still is artfully built by Vendome’s many employees.“We are who we are,” Sherman said. “We stand behind everything that goes out of here. It’s hard to argue with over 100 years of success.” Editors’ Recommendations Mezcal Unión Takes a People-First Approach to Making Spirits Raleigh Denim Workshop Makes Jeans with Artistry and Ingenuity in the U.S.A. What Wrangler Is Doing to Make Denim More Sustainable Hillrock Estate Distillery Is Making Some of the Best Whiskey in Americalast_img read more

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Pap Test Guidelines Change

first_imgAll women who have ever had sex need to have a regular Pap test, but the rules about when to start having Pap tests, how often to have them and when to stop having them, have changed. “Regular Pap tests are still the best protection against cervical cancer — preventing up to 90 per cent of deaths from the disease,” said Dr. Robert Grimshaw, medical director, Cancer Care Nova Scotia’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Program. “Until recently, we recommended annual Pap tests for all women as soon as they became sexually active. The new guidelines, by contrast, are very individual and depend on the results of a woman’s previous Pap tests. However, the changes in no way lessen the importance of regular Pap tests.” This message and details about the new guidelines were shared today, Oct. 19, in Halifax during the launch of Pap Test Awareness Week, Oct. 22 to 28. The new guidelines say: — Women should begin having Pap tests within three years of first vaginal sexual activity or at age 21. This vaginal sexual activity includes vaginal intercourse, vaginal-oral and vaginal-digital sexual activity and use of shared sex toys/devices. — If it has been more than five years since a woman has had a Pap test, she needs to have three yearly Pap tests in a row, until there are three consecutive negative test results. Then, she can have a Pap test every two years. — Women who are on the birth control pill and who have had three consecutive annual negative tests should have a Pap test every two years. — Women who are in a same sex relationship should have regular Pap tests. — Pregnant women should have Pap tests according to the same guidelines as women who are not pregnant. — Women may stop having Pap tests at age 75 only if they have an adequate negative screening history over the previous 10 years (at least three negative tests). — Women who have undergone a total hysterectomy (removal of the uterus and cervix) and who have no history of cervical dysplasia/cancer, probably do not need to have Pap tests. If they are uncertain, they should check with their health-care provider. “We know that Pap test can save lives and do,” said Health Minister Chris d’Entremont. “These new guidelines reinforce that and place even greater emphasis on why it’s important for women to get one.” A group of cancer specialists, family doctors and others worked with the Cervical Cancer Prevention Program to develop the new guidelines. They reviewed the existing guidelines, which had been in place since the program was established in 1991. They also assessed guidelines of other screening programs, researched evidence about the development of cervical cancer, and studied Nova Scotia’s cervical cancer statistics. “I recently told a patient that doing Pap smears are a bright light in my day. As a doctor, I would far prefer to see a woman for a procedure like this when we have a 95 per cent chance of preventing a horrible illness,” said Dr. Rhonda Church, president of Doctors Nova Scotia. “Like many doctors, I often suggest to women that they plan to have their Pap test during their birthday month. That way, it’s easy to remember and they can consider it a gift to themselves and the people who care about them.” The new provincial guidelines recommend that all women who have ever had sex have regular Pap tests. Women are encouraged to speak with their family doctor or health-care provider about what ‘regular’ means for them. They may also call the Cervical Cancer Prevention Program at 1-888-480-8588 to find out more about Pap testing or to learn about the results of their previous Pap tests. “This year it is estimated that every week, one woman in Nova Scotia will be diagnosed with cervical cancer,” said Maureen Summers, executive director of the Canadian Cancer Society – Nova Scotia Division. “The rules have changed, but one thing remains the same, prevention and early detection are key, especially when you consider that at least 50 per cent of cancers can be prevented through healthy living and policies that protect the public. This includes following cancer screening guidelines, such as having a regular Pap test.” Each year during Pap Test Awareness Week, Cancer Care Nova Scotia’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Program partners with community groups and organizations, including the Department of Health, Doctors Nova Scotia, the Canadian Cancer Society – Nova Scotia Division, and the Nova Scotia College of Laboratory Technologists, to raise awareness about the benefits of regular Pap tests. Over the next two weeks, information about Pap tests and the new guidelines will be shared with women throughout Nova Scotia through print and radio advertisements, and informational brochures. Cancer Care Nova Scotia’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Program is dedicated to reducing the incidence of cervical cancer in Nova Scotia. Strategies are aimed at educating women about the importance of regular Pap tests, and putting measures in place to support women taking appropriate action. Cancer Care Nova Scotia is a program of the Department of Health, created to reduce the burden of cancer on individuals, families and the health-care system through prevention, screening and research. It also aims to lessen the fear of cancer through education and information. Its programs are community-centred, compassionate to patients, cost-effective and based on sound research. The Department of Health, through leadership and collaboration, works to ensure an appropriate, effective and sustainable health system that promotes, maintains and improves the health of Nova Scotians. Doctors Nova Scotia is the professional association that represents more than 3,000 physicians, medical students and residents in the province. The association works with other health-care organizations to enhance the quality of medical care for Nova Scotians through health promotion, development of health-care policies, medical education and negotiations with government on behalf of its members. The Canadian Cancer Society – Nova Scotia Division, is a community-based, non-profit organization that partners with communities to overcome cancer and create healthier lives for all Nova Scotians. The society achieves its mission through research, programs that bring help and hope to people affected by cancer, and prevention initiatives that help people reduce their cancer risk. Women should have three yearly Pap tests in a row. If all three of those tests are negative (normal) they only need to have a Pap test every two years, unless: they have ever been treated (by LEEP, laser, conization, cryotherapy, cautery, or hysterectomy) for cervical dysplasia or cancer of the cervix or they are immuno-suppressed (HIV positive, transplant patients). These women should have yearly Pap tests for life. last_img read more

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