Staco Insurance Plc (STACO.ng) 2016 Abridged Report

first_imgStaco Insurance Plc (STACO.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2016 abridged results.For more information about Staco Insurance Plc (STACO.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Staco Insurance Plc (STACO.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Staco Insurance Plc (STACO.ng)  2016 abridged results.Company ProfileStaco Insurance Plc is an insurance company in Nigeria licensed to cover non-life insurance for fire, general accident, motor vehicle, oil and gas, marine, aviation, bond and engineering. Other insurance products cover fidelity guarantees, professional indemnity, goods-in-transit, employer liability, burglary, public liability and group/personal accident as well as transportation insurance which includes motor, marine hull and cargo and aviation insurance. Fire and bond insurance products cover fire and special perils, homeowner/holder, all-risks, engineering and bond insurance. Customised insurance products cover motor insurance, personal protection and homeowners insurance. Staco Insurance Plc has business interests in Sierra Leone offering life and non-life insurance products to individuals and corporate customers. Formerly known as Standard Trust Assurance Plc, the company changed its name to Staco Insurance Plc in 2006. Its head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Staco Insurance Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Jail chaplains share presence of God with Virginia inmates through…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY From left, Robert Dilday, John Gayle, Cheryl Blackwell and Sal Anselmo are among the volunteer chaplains from St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church that minister at the city jail in Richmond, Virginia. Photo: Sarah Bartenstein[Episcopal News Service] Robert Dilday has served for about a year and a half as a volunteer chaplain at the city jail in Richmond, Virginia, leading Bible studies with inmates and, more recently, visiting with those being held in solitary confinement. As part of a growing team from St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church engaged in this ministry, he is careful not to overstate the mission.“We’re not taking God to the jail,” he told Episcopal News Service. “We’re collaborating with what God is already doing there.”What Dilday, 62, and his fellow chaplains bring to the jail every Thursday afternoon is the sacrament of Communion and a personal connection through conversation. They are part of a much larger interfaith ministry at the jail that offers a chance for chaplains and inmates both to feel the presence of God in a place they might not expect it.“It’s meant to be somewhat reciprocal,” said Sarah Bartenstein, St. Stephen’s communications director. “We’re praying for them on Sundays, and they’re praying for us.”The Eucharist served every Thursday at the Richmond jail by the volunteer chaplains from St. Stephen’s is blessed every Sunday at the church’s worship services. Photo: Sarah BartensteinThe inmates and chaplains discuss Bible passages taken from the readings that will be part of the three worship services at St. Stephen’s on Sunday. And during one of those services, the congregation blesses the wafers and juice that will be the Eucharist served to inmates who choose to receive it the following Thursday.This ministry at St. Stephen’s is barely two years old, and now about 15 to 20 men and women from the congregation serve as chaplains on a rotating schedule, typically with two men and two women visiting the jail each week to minister separately to male and female inmates.Episcopal jail and prison ministries can be found across the country as chaplains seek to live out their baptismal vows to respect human dignity. In Richmond, Virginia’s capital, St. Stephen’s is not the only church to send volunteer chaplains to the jail, but it is one of the few to serve the Eucharist. And Deb Lawrence, the church’s outreach director, said the St. Stephen’s team doesn’t want the inmates to feel during these visits that they are being judged for what they’ve done.“We’re just there with them. We’re not there to preach or convert, nothing like that,” Lawrence said. “It’s about relationships and people praying for each other on a weekly basis.”St. Stephen’s first got involved with the jail ministry because of John Gayle, a congregation member who was interested in new outreach opportunities.Gayle, a lawyer who at age 64 specializes in consumer law, had some past experience with criminal law and representing inmates. He already was involved in a church ministry of bringing the Eucharist to people in retirement homes and nursing homes who couldn’t attend church services, and he was drawn to the idea of pursuing a similar ministry at the jail.Gayle said he wasn’t sure what to expect on his first jail visits. He began simply by reading from the Bible and talking to the men.“It was such a transforming experience for me in terms of seeing people who are murders and rapists and all kinds of people, who are no different inside than me in their fears and concerns,” he told ENS. “And I found such a humanity in them that was very inspiring to me.”Sharing the word of God, ending in silenceThe Bible studies typically are held in a jail classroom. They start with the Bible passage, sometimes read by one inmate and other times read by several inmates in turn. Then they have a free discussion of what they’ve read.Dilday said he encourages the inmates to share ways the Bible passages resonate with their experiences. They may choose to read some or all of the passage a second time.One Bible study session sticks out in Dilday’s mind. The Gospel passage related to the idea of one’s neighbor, he said, and that prompted a discussion about the different ways “neighbor” is understood in American society. A young white man, a middle-aged Latino man and an older black man took particular interest in the subject, and the three inmates engaged in a lively but respectful conversation, with little additional encouragement from Dilday.The sessions may last an hour or more. To conclude, the group spends a few moments in silent contemplation.“Silence, I suspect, is rare,” Dilday said. “When those moments of intentional silence are offered, I think they’re appreciated.”The St. Stephen’s growing team of volunteers has mirrored an overall growth trend in the Richmond jail’s chaplaincy program.  It is overseen by the jail’s sole paid chaplain, the Rev. Louis Williams, who estimates about 150 volunteers participate in the program, an increase of about 60 to 70 since he became chief of chaplains in January 2016.The Richmond City Justice Center’s inmate population tops 1,000 on an average day, making it the second largest jail in the state behind the jail in Norfolk, Williams said.The chaplains, primarily lay people, come from dozens of congregations in the Richmond area. One of the chaplains is a Muslim, though most are from various Christian denominations. Some conduct worship services. Others have led groups of inmates in singing hymns.The volunteers must be recommended by a congregation, fill out an application, undergo a background check and attend an orientation, but one of the most important criteria is that they “have a gift and skill and passion in terms to ministering to the least of these,” Williams said, invoking Matthew 25:40.Williams, a Presbyterian minister known at the jail as “Pastor Louis,” advises new chaplains during orientation they should be true to their beliefs, but also respectful of other faiths. The jail calls its inmates “residents,” in recognition that most of them are preparing to someday re-enter society. For spiritually receptive jail residents, Williams said, simply sharing faith through scripture can help them succeed on that path.“Scripture is used to build up people’s identity and give them different perspective, God’s perspective, on who they are,” he said.Prayer through a cell doorThe chaplains take a different approach to ministering to inmates held in isolation, also known as solitary confinement. There is no Bible study here. A deputy is always present. Conversation occurs only while kneeling at the cell door and looking at each other through the door’s narrow slot.Williams provides additional orientation for these visits, advising the chaplains to emphasize their prayer ministry, not just conversation with the inmates.Dilday and Gayle are the two chaplains from St. Stephen’s who presently participate in this ministry, typically about once a month. Each time, they visit about 20 to 25 men, never for more than 10 minutes at a time.The inmates seem to value the human interaction and often have serious concerns they want to share, Dilday said. One man said he was having a hard time dealing with the news that his child had died while he was locked up.In isolation, “the stories that are shared are a little rawer,” Dilday said. “It can sometimes be hard to leave the jail after hearing those stories.” Such stories can haunt chaplains well after the cell door slot closes shut.The chaplains don’t serve the Eucharist here, but they are able to hold the inmates’ hands through the slot and pray with them.Dilday said he wasn’t fearful of visiting the jail’s isolation cells, but initially he felt he was venturing into the unknown. Would it be more difficult to talk with the inmates held here, isolated for a range of infractions?He and Gayle found that wasn’t the case at all. They and the other jail chaplains have found these visits inspiring, and not just for the inmates.“This has been transformative to people at St. Stephen’s just as much as it has been transformative for people at the jail,” Dilday said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA July 31, 2017 at 5:20 pm This story reminds me of my time in a very similar ministry at the San Mateo County Jail in Redwood City, CA. Those of us who were a part of the Episcopal outreach team worked within the ecumenical and interdenominational Service League of San Mateo County and our time “inside” was very similar. Every week featured Bible Study, wide-ranging discussions, and sharing the Eucharist as Lay Eucharistic Ministers. We also shared ashes on Ash Wednesday. With my very basic Spanish, I was eventually able to conduct some of the liturgies in my Spanish-language BCP, which helped reach the multi-cultural jail inmate population.William Swing, the Bishop of the Diocese oif California during this time, was a big supporter of our work and empowered it from the beginning.If you want to engage in life-changing work, go to jail. You will never be the same and it will do wonders for your own spiritual life as much as it does for the inmates. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Jail chaplains share presence of God with Virginia inmates through Bible studies, prayer New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC By David PaulsenPosted Jul 31, 2017 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Jon Spangler says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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Vote for Football League’s official charity partner

first_img* Everyman* Help For Heroes* Marie Curie Cancer Care* The Bobby Moore FundVoting closes on 9 September at 14.30.The Board of The Football League will then select the official charity partner from the two charities that receive the most votes. It will announce the winner on 11 September 2009.www.football-league.co.uk/page/CharityVote/0,,10794~1778615,00.html Vote for Football League’s official charity partner About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 4 September 2009 | News The Football League is inviting football fans to help them choose which charity should become itsofficial charity partner for the 2009/10 Season.There are five charities to choose from, each of them one “with which football supporters can relate.” They are:* Care of Police Survivors Advertisementcenter_img  26 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: charity of the year corporatelast_img read more

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Vigil for Oscar Grant

first_imgOscar Grant’s daughter, Tatiana, with Cephus ‘Uncle Bobby’ Johnson and Jack Bryson.Photo: Ingrid MartinOn New Year’s Day, family and supporters marked the fourth anniversary of the killing of Oscar Grant by Bay Area Rapid Transit police officer Johannes Mehserle. Grant’s daughter, Tatiana, pictured here, was four years old at the time. After Mehserle won a change of venue to Los Angeles, he was found guilty of the lesser charge of manslaughter. Attorney John Burris is still pressing for federal murder charges against Mehserle.The killing was well documented on video and broadcast worldwide. Grant was restrained and unarmed when Mehserle shot him in the back. Mehserle was sentenced to two years, minus time served in the Los Angeles County Jail. Also pictured are Grant’s uncle, Cephus “Uncle Bobby” Johnson, and Jack Bryson, whose son was with Grant when he was killed.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Frogs win instant classic over Texas Tech, 55-52

first_imgDean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ Texas Tech defensive back Justis Nelson (31) grabs TCU wide receiver Josh Doctson (9) after a pass was deflected to running back Aaron Green (22) for a touchdown during the fourth quarter of an NCAA college football game Saturday, Sept. 26, 2015, in Lubbock, Texas. TCU won 55-52. (AP Photo/LM Otero) Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ Dean Straka is a senior journalism major from Lake Forest, California. He currently serves as Sports Line Editor for TCU 360. His passions include golf, God, traveling, and sitting down to watch the big game of the day. Follow him on Twitter at @dwstraka49 ReddIt TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Linkedin Linkedin Equestrian defeated in Big 12 Championship Facebook Men’s tennis clinches consecutive Big 12 titles with win over No. 4 Baylor Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ + posts Previous articleWomen’s golf finishes second at Colorado tournamentNext articleFrogs drop to No. 4 in AP Poll, No. 3 in coaches poll Dean Straka RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ ReddIt TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Twitter Facebook Norrie climbs to No. 1 in national rankings Twitter Dean Straka Equestrian upsets No. 1 Baylor, swept by Texas A&M at NCEA Championships printThe No. 3 Horned Frogs survived yet another thriller Saturday, beating the Texas Tech Red Raiders 55-52 in comeback fashion at Jones AT&T Stadium in Lubbock, Texas to improve to 4-0.The team was propelled by last second heroics from senior running back Aaron Green, who caught a tipped pass for the go ahead touchdown on fourth and goal with only 23 seconds left in the game. The Frogs entered the drive trailing 52-48.“I’ve got to give this group credit,” TCU head coach Gary Patterson said. “They just keep finding a way to find a win, even when people say you weren’t supposed to.”TCU quarterback Trevone Boykin said he couldn’t believe it when he saw that Green had swooped in to make the grab.“He was supposed to be over the ball, not at the back of the end zone, but thank God he was,” Boykin said. “Sometimes you just need a little luck in this game and we pulled through.”The game was an offensive show for both teams. The Frogs totaled 750 yards of offense in the game, while the Red Raiders totaled 607 yards.Boykin threw for a whopping 485 yards and 4 touchdown passes in the win. Senior wide receiver Josh Doctson caught for a TCU single game record 267 yards, in addition to catching three touchdown passes.Doctson’s record night was complemented by 18 receptions, tying the Big 12 record for the most catches by any player in a single game.“To win a ballgame like that, you’re going to have to have somebody do something like that,” Patterson said.  “It was awesome.”Boykin praised Doctson for his record performance against the Red Raiders.“Josh is a great receiver,” Boykin said. “He makes plays all over the field. He’s been through the fire with us, and he really just comes out and plays his heart out every time we’re out there.”Doctson, often a critic of his performance, was also pleased with the team’s offensive showing.“We just played with a ton of effort without the ball in this game,” Doctson said. “That last play on fourth and four was a prime example, we were just playing hard until the last minute.”The Frogs opened the scoring on their first drive of the game in the first quarter, when Boykin found Doctson for a 9 yard touchdown pass to put TCU ahead 7-0. The Red Raiders would respond during the following drive however, when running back DeAndre Washington ran the ball in for a 1 yard touchdown to tie the game at 7 apiece.Heavy rain impacted the game midway through the first quarter, but the weather eventually moved out of the area by the second quarter.The Frogs led the Red Raiders 16-14 at the end of the first quarter, but Texas Tech would jump out to a 21-16 lead when Texas Tech quarterback Patrick Mahomes found Jakeem Grant for a 44 yard touchdown pass. The Frogs would lead the Red Raiders 33-28 at the half though, propelled by a second touchdown pass to Doctson with just 15 seconds left in the second quarter.The Frogs looked destined to extend their lead even further in the opening drive of the second half, but senior kicker Jaden Oberkrom missed a 25 yard field goal attempt wide right. Oberkrom had already had a field goal attempt blocked early on in the 2nd quarter.Texas Tech would regain the lead 35-33 on the following drive, thanks to another short rushing touchdown by Washington.The Frogs went on to respond with another touchdown on the next drive. This time it was Green, rushing 7 yards into the end zone to put the Frogs ahead 40-35, in what became a back and forth battle between the two teams.  A Texas Tech field goal on the ensuing drive, however, made it 40-38 entering the fourth quarter.After several lead changes early on in the fourth, including a touchdown which saw the Frogs complete a two point conversion, Texas Tech went ahead on the Frogs 52-48 when Mahomes completed a 50-yard touchdown pass to Justin Stockton with 5:55 left in the game.The Red Raiders’ defense forced their only three and out against the Frogs the entire night on the next drive, but the Frogs’ defense responded on the following drive, giving the ball back to TCU with just over three minutes left in the contest.The Frogs would move the ball all the way to the Texas Tech 4 yard line within the final minute of play, but Texas Tech’s defense held Boykin and company, forcing the Frogs to go for it on fourth down, down four points with only 23 seconds left on the clock.Boykin attempted a pass to Doctson that was tipped off Doctson’s fingers, but the tip was caught in the end zone by a diving Aaron Green for the game winning touchdown, stunning the crowd of 61,283.“Thank goodness,” Patterson said. “I don’t know where he came from, but thank goodness. As soon as I saw it [Green’s foot] go down I knew it was a catch.”Green said that for him, it was simply a matter of following the ball.“My coaches always preach it to us,” Green said. “Whoever has the ball, follow it, because you never know when something like that might happen. I saw it the whole way, and I caught it.”Doctson said he asked himself if he was dreaming upon seeing Green make the score.Texas Tech had a chance to stun the Frogs on the last play of the game, completing several laterals to make it all the way to the red zone. Grant however was forced out of bounds at the 10 yard line, sealing the deal for the Frogs in an all-time classic.Patterson said he was in for a bit of a shock when the Red Raiders nearly carried out the play that eerily resembled the ending of the game between Cal and Stanford in 1982.“I saw the offensive line and I was like, ‘you’ve got to be kidding me’,” Patterson said. “We had guys running all over the place, thinking ‘how is one guy going to get him on the ground’?”The Frogs defense once again struggled in the win however. Not only did they allow 607 yards of total offense in the game, but the Red Raiders particularly shredded the Frogs’ goal line defense, going 5-5 on scoring chances in the red zone.“You’ve got to just get stops because we’re going to look at film and find out it was not necessarily what Tech did on some of them,” Patterson said.  “There’s little things [new guys] have to learn that you have been telling them, and until it happens to them in a ballgame and it’s at a pivotal point, they don’t get it.”Patterson said that he would have preferred to give up fewer points, but all that matters is that his team came out on top.“It’s hard to go on the road and win in this conference,” Patterson said. “We haven’t won here in four times, and we took a ballgame like that to win. Right now we’re very excited about winning 55-52.”The offense also suffered a setback in the loss of senior receiver Ty Slanina, who suffered a broken collarbone in the first half of the game. Patterson said Slanina will likely miss the rest of the 2015 season.The Frogs showed a lack of discipline in giving up 10 penalties for 110 yards, including a bizarre sideline interference penalty late in the game. Texas Tech only allowed three penalties for a mere 32 yards.For Patterson and company though, it’s all about moving past mistakes and looking forward to the next opponent.“There’s some things you’ve got to learn from it,” head coach Gary Patterson said. “You’ve got Texas up next at home.”The Frogs take on the Texas Longhorns back in Fort Worth on October 3. Kickoff is set for 11 a.m. CDT.last_img read more

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Warnings for the independent press

first_img RSF_en Receive email alerts April 28, 2021 Find out more News News 3. The “security” and their methodsThe press can these days write about, criticise and even caricature Hamidou Laânigri, the head of the Directorate of Territorial Security (DST), Morocco’s most important intelligence agency. This was unthinkable in the time of Driss Basri, King Hassan’s interior minister. But some areas of the DST’s activities are still sensitive. The “security services” do not want the press probing these areas, and they do not hesitate to make it known.Maria Moukrim, a journalist with the Arabic-language weekly Al Ayyam, received a threatening call on her mobile telephone as she was leaving her office in Casablanca on 13 March: “I’d never before been insulted like this. The caller referred to my report about a secret detention centre that appeared in Al Ayyam. He said I could have a car accident if I carried on writing this kind of story.” When Moukrim asked her caller to identify himself, he replied: “We are the ones you had the nerve to criticise in your article.” He then told her where she was at that moment, in the street near a taxi. A young man suddenly struck her with a blunt object, injuring her left hand. She then received another call from the same person asking if she had learned her lesson.Moukrim had written an article in January on a secret detention centre in the Rabat suburb of Témara. It is called the “green prison” because of the colour of the faces of those who have been tortured there. She was not able to visit the centre, but she spoke to people who had been detained there and to people who lived nearby. Why did the DST wait two months before expressing its displeasure? “We don’t know,” said Al Ayyam managing editor Nordine Miftah. “No doubt it is a way of telling us they still have their eye on us, that they never forget.” Moukrim was shocked by the incident and filed a complaint against persons unknown, but does not expect anything will result. Ali Amar, the publisher of Le Journal Hebdomadaire, and one of his journalists, Mouaad Rhandy, were detained by Moroccan police for three hours on 23 October 2002 at the frontier with Ceuta (one of the two Spanish enclaves in northern Morocco). There were taken to an office of the investigative police where they were handed a summons for questioning in the Zahidi case. They were then questioned about the case by DST agents. Amar and Rhandy had published an interview on 19 October with Moulay Zine Zahidi, the former head of a bank, the Crédit Immobilier et Hôtelier (CIH), now on the run. The interview contained revelations about the way the bank was run (which had already been the subject of a parliamentary investigation) and pointed the finger at several political leaders. “They searched our car from top to bottom. They ripped out the seats and they took our mobile telephone, our files and our camera,” Amar said.The management of the Arabic-language daily Al Ahdate Al Maghribia told one of its journalists, Latifa Boussaâdan, on 15 October 2002 that she was being fired for “gross misconduct” because she allegedly sent a photograph of Gen. Laânigri, the DST chief, by e-mail to Demain Magazine. Boussaâdan denies the charge. The shot of Laânigri was taken at a cabinet meeting earlier that month by one of the daily’s photographers. Surprised at being photographed, Laânigri had ordered the photographer not to publish it, threatening him in the presence of witnesses. The newspaper respected the general’s “wish,” said Boussaâdan, who believes he was behind her dismissal. She said editor in chief Abdelkrim Lemrani asked her: “Why did you send that photo of Laânigri? Don’t you know we are on excellent terms with him? And don’t you know that, if he wants, he could open a file on you?” Boussaâdan said she thought her refusal to follow the example of most of her colleagues and file a complaint against Lmrabet was also part of the motive for her dismissal. The newspaper, for its part, denies pressuring its journalists to bring complaints against Lmrabet.The DST has for several years had its sights on the Islamist movement Al-Adl Wal Ihsane, led by Sheikh Yassine. Issue No. 34 of Rissalat Al Foutouwa, a weekly that supports the movement, was seized by the authorities on 6 April 2001 without any explanation although its editor, Mohamed Aghnaj, possesses a stamped form dated February 1999 permitting its publication. The newspaper had previously been confiscated without explanation on several occasions in 2000. In 2001, “the authorities put a lot of pressure on printers and distributers to prevent the newspaper coming out,” the editor said. No. 35/36 was also seized on the night of 22 May 2001 from the premises of the distributing company. Subsequently, several printers told the newspaper’s staff they could not print it on the orders of the head of the DST chief Laânigri. The staff managed to keep printing and distributing by using Al-Adl Wal Ihsan’s network of activists. But activists were thereafter arrested on several occasions as they distributed copies outside mosques. Finally, the staff suspended publication and today the newspaper is under a de facto ban.”The security use so-called ‘independent’ newspapers for their own purposes,” said Hassan Nejmi, president of the Union of Moroccan Writers and a journalist with the daily Al Ittihad Al Ichtiraki. “Some, like Al Ahdate Al Maghribia, are used to attack leading civil society figures who annoy. Others, such as Le Matin du Sahara, are used to convey official views. The distribution of tasks is clear.” Nejmi himself has been the target of a campaign of insults in the columns of Al Ahdate Al Maghribia. Mohamed Brini, the editor of Al Ahdate Al Maghribia, denies being in the government’s pay. Tailing and telephone tapping are also standard DST practice, many journalists say. 1. The emergence of an independent pressArticle 9 of the Moroccan constitution, which was amended in 1992, says “freedom of opinion, freedom of expression in all its forms” are guaranteed. King Hassan’s decision in July 1994 to repeal a “dahir” (royal decree) which had helped to gag the press since 1935, and then his decision to decree a general amnesty constituted a first step towards a freer press.Tired of the political party organs, the only press available since the 1960s, Moroccans turned to the independent press with the democratic opening of the 1990s. New newspapers appeared, such as Le Journal, Demain Magazine or Assahifa, and won many readers.”For the first time, Moroccans were enjoying a degree of freedom that had no comparison with the past,” said Hassan Nejmi, Rabat bureau chief of the daily Al Ittihad Al Ichtiraki (the newspaper of the Socialist Union of Popular Forces – USFP). Journalists seized on the new opportunity to create bold, sometimes irreverent publications such as Demain Magazine and Douman, which introduced caricature and satire.Nonetheless, the readership is much smaller than in other countries of northern Africa. All the Moroccan print media combined sell only 350,000 copies a day, compared with 500,000 in Tunisia, 1.3 million in Algeria and 2.2 million in Egypt. Morocco has 641 publications (including around 20 daily newspapers) and 1,800 journalists. “These figures are very low for a country that aspires to turn itself into a democracy,” acknowledged communication minister Nabil Benabdallah. 2. Prosecuted for “insulting the person of the king”Abdelmoumen Dilami, the owner of the printing works Ecoprint, told Ali Lmrabet on 2 May that, because of pressure being put on him, he would have to stop printing the two satirical weeklies Lmrabet edits, Demain Magazine and Douman. “What would you want me to do? We are vulnerable. They use insidious methods,” said Dilami, who has nonetheless promised to carry on printing the two weeklies until Lmrabet finds other printers.Lmrabet was due to appear in court on 7 May on charges of “insulting the person of the king”, “offence against territorial integrity” and “offence against the monarchy.” On 1 April, he was summoned for questioning by the Rabat investigative police at the behest of the royal prosecutor of the Rabat higher level court. He was interrogated for five hours about articles and cartoons that had appeared in recent months on such subjects as the annual allowance that parliament granted the royal family (detailed in a finance ministry document distributed to parliamentarians), a cartoon strip on the history of slavery and a photomontage of Moroccan political personalities. “Are you aware that you have harmed the sacred status of institutions?” Lmrabet was asked. They also questioned him about an interview with a Moroccan republican who advocated self-determination for Western Sahara, accusing him of “undermining Morocco’s territorial integrity.”As Lmrabet was about to fly from Rabat airport to Paris on 17 April, two agents from the DST, the government’s main intelligence service, told him he was banned from leaving Morocco “on the instructions of the DST.” When he asked if there was a court order to this effect, they said no. Government spokesman Nabil Benabdallah defended the ban the same day: “Ali Lmrabet is the subject of several lawsuits. This is a preventive measure by the investigative police to ensure that he is present at the trials.” The trials he referred to concern 40 complaints brought against him by journalists with the Arabic-language daily Al Ahdate Al Maghribia over a cartoon in Demain Magazine on 11 May 2002 describing the daily as “pornographic.” The spokesman added: “It wasn’t the DST that took the decision but the DGSN, which is responsible for policing the borders. The DGSN acted at the request of the investigative police… I am not authorised to express a view on this subject, that’s the job of the judicial authorities.” The justice ministry said nothing and none of its staff was willing to be interviewed by Reporters Without Borders. “By forbidding Ali Lmrabet to leave the country, the authorities were not only judging him on his alleged intentions, they were usurping the role of the judiciary, which alone has the authorities to deprive him of his freedom of movement,” said his lawyer Ahmed Benjelloun. The government spokesman announced at another press conference a week later that Lmrabet could after all leave the country.Aboubakr Jamaï, the editor of Le Journal Hebdomadaire, wrote in his editorial of 26 April: “Ali Lmrabet will be tried by judges whose career depends on the person who is responsible for prosecuting him… Lmrabet will have to defend himself before judges whose professional career depends on the High Council for the Judiciary, of which the president is none other than the king. How can one think that Ali Lmrabet will have a fair trial?” Lmrabet is adamant that, “a decision to press this kind of prosecution could not have been taken without the king’s endorsement.” Lmrabet was already convicted and sentenced by a high-level court in Rabat in November 2001 to four months in prison and a fine of 30,000 dirhams (3,000 euros) for “publishing false information jeopardising or likely to jeopardise public order.” A report in Demain Magazine headlined: “Skhirat palace reportedly up for sale,” published on 20 October 2001, was described by the prosecutor as a “tissue of false information and utterly mendacious allegations.” In Lmrabet’s view, the real reason for this earlier prosecution was his reporting on Moulay Hicham, the king’s cousin, and the publication in the issue of 27 October 2001 of advance extracts from a book on Morocco, entitled “The Last King,” by Le Monde journalist Jean-Pierre Tuquoi. 4. Still sensitive subjects- The king and the royal family”The person of the king is inviolable and sacred,” according to article 23 of the Moroccan constitution. “The Moroccan political system has a name, the makhzen, and the king is its cornerstone,” says Ahmed Benchemsi, editor of the weekly Tel Quel. “Not being free to include him in an analysis leads straight to schizophrenia: you write one thing but think the opposite. You choose a number of scapegoats… whom you rail at all the more furiously because you are forbidden to mention the palace, the most important political actor in this country.”As printing of the latest issue of Le Journal Hebdomadaire got under way on 30 November 2002, plain-clothes police arrived at the printing works: “Police, stop everything. We have orders to stop the printing and distribution of the newspaper. What do you mean by ‘King and God’?” The headline of the newspaper’s front-page lead was: “The King and God, return to the regime’s religious roots.” After five hours of telephone calls with the printers and the distributors, the issue was finally given the go-ahead to appear. The police never showed any written order.The 7 March 2002 issue of the French weekly VSD was not sold on the streets of Morocco. It was not released by Sochepresse, the company responsible for its distribution. VSD asked the authorities for an explanation but received no answer. The issue had a report headlined “The man who did not want to be king” that offered a candid portrait of Mohammed VI and a critical assessment of the first three years of his reign, referring to two controversial books about Morocco: “Our friend the king” by Gilles Perrault (1990) and “The last king” by Jean-Pierre Tuquoi (2001).The French daily Libération is usually sold on stands the next day in Morocco, but the issue of 22 January 2002 was held back by the distributing company, Sochepresse. It had a story headlined “Moulay Rachid: the very costly vacation of the King of Morocco’s brother” about a stay in an Acapulco hotel that cost 10,200 dollars a day (11, 547 euros at the then rate). The report said the king’s brother “rented the imperial suite of the luxury Quinta Real hotel and 24 other rooms” and was “accompanied by 16 people including three beautiful models.” The distributor Sochepresse also held back the 31 October 2001 issue of the French weekly Le Canard enchaîné, which had a piece about Tuquoi’s book “The last king.” The report said: “In two and a half years on the throne, (King Hassan’s) son has done little except crack down on the press, give in to the Islamists on women’s rights, manage his immense fortune and practice sport.” – Prince Moulay HichamThe king’s cousin, Prince Moulay Hicham, is nowadays in disgrace and is rarely mentioned in the political party newspapers. If independent newspapers quote him, they do so at their risk. Plain-clothes police seized 8,000 copes of issue No. 15 of the Arabic-language quarterly Wijhat Nadhar from the Najah printing works in Casablanca on 6 May. “No justification” was given for the seizure, said the quarterly’s editor, Abdellatif Hosni. The issue included the translation of a lecture Prince Moulay Hicham gave in May 2001 at the French Institute for International Relations in Paris in which the prince, then living in the United States, said the Moroccan monarchy needed to be “reformed.”- Western SaharaThe issue of Western Sahara (annexed by Morocco) has to be treated with the utmost care. The least deviation from the official line may be sanctioned. Hence, for example, the charge against Ali Lmrabet of “jeopardising territorial integrity” for just publishing extracts of an interview with Moroccan republican Abdallah Zaâzaâ, in which Zaâzaâ voiced support for “the self-determination of the Saharawi people.” Lmrabet had even gone to the trouble of removing some passages from the interview, which originally appeared in the Spanish daily Avui.Ignacio Cembrero, a reporter with the Spanish daily El País, was tailed on 8 and 9 March 2002 after arriving in Rabat the day before to write about Western Sahara. Without offering any explanation, the Moroccan authorities banned distribution of issue No. 1528 of the Spanish weekly Cambio 16, dated 19 March 2001. It had a story headlined “Sahara prepares for war” in which reporter Rocio Castrillo wrote that, “an army of 30,000 soldiers… is preparing to confront the Moroccan invader,” and quoted a Polisario Front official, Brahim Ghali, as criticising “the intransigent and colonial will of Morocco’s expansionist regime.” – The IslamistsThe September 2002 legislative elections were marked by the sizable vote polled by the Islamists. The authorities had previously betrayed nervousness about this prospect. For example, Al Ayyam editor Nordine Miftah received a call while in Agadir on 16 August 2002 from a police superintendent asking him to come “at once” to Casablanca. There he was interrogated for several hours about an interview with an Islamist leader, Abdallah el Chadli, that had appeared on 11 July 2002. The journalist who conducted the interview, Anas Mezzour, was summoned for the same reason two days later and was questioned for nearly five hours.Mezzour had already run ran afoul of the authorities on 7 January 2002, when he, a lawyer and a member of a local humanitarian organisation together visited Islamists held in the main prison of Kénitra. As they were about to leave the prison at the end of the afternoon, they were arrested by a group of individuals in civilian dress. Mezzour was taken to the office of the prison governor, where a man he recognized as a security service agent overpowered him and snatched his tape-recorder. He was then held for three hours and was only allowed to go after the prison governor called the local prosecutor.- Ahmed “Bziz” SanoussiSatirist Ahmed “Bziz” Sanoussi has been banned from national TV and radio in Morocco for more than 10 years. “When I ask senior officials about the ban, they reply that the decision to censor me was taken ‘up there’,” Bziz said. He was interviewed by the public television channel 2M during demonstrations against the war in Iraq in March but the interview was never screened. The transmission of an Al-Jazeera report containing an interview with Bziz was also blocked (see below). This was regrettable because “the present ruling class is excellent raw material for caricature and satire,” said Bziz. Help by sharing this information 5. A press law and anti-terrorist bill that violate freedomsThe UN special rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, Abid Hussain, called on all governments on 18 January 2000 “to ensure that press crimes are no longer subject to prison sentences except for crimes such as racist or discriminatory comments or appeals for violence.” He added that the imposition of a prison sentence for the peaceful expression of opinion “constitutes a serious violation of human rights.” Nonetheless, press offences were made punishable by prison terms in no less than 20 articles of Law No. 77-00 of 3 October 2002, which amends and adds to Dahir No. 1-58-378 of 15 November 1958. Several journalists have been sentenced to prison terms in the past two years. On 14 February 2002, the Casablanca appeal court gave Le Journal Hebdomadaire publisher Aboubakr Jamaï a three-month suspended sentence and Ali Amar, the managing editor, a two-month suspended sentence. They were convicted of libel for a series of reports in the newspaper (which was banned at the end of 2000) criticising the way ambassador Mohammed Benaissa bought a house in Washington in 1996 on Morocco’s behalf.The new press law also maintains the provision for the seizure of publications without a court order. According to article 77, the interior minister can order the seizure a newspaper likely to “disturb the peace.” It was on the basis of this provision, which already existed in the 1958 press law, that the weeklies Le Journal, Assahifa and Demain were banned at the end of 2000.There are positive aspects to the new press law such as lighter punishments, smaller fines, less red tape for starting up a publication and the need to justify confiscations. But it maintains prison sentences of three to five years for defaming the king, princes and princesses (albeit less than the five to 20 years in the 1958 law). And it appends to this article the provision that: “The same sentences apply when the publication of a newspaper or piece of writing constitute an offence to Islam, the monarchy or territorial integrity.” Lmrabet is being prosecuted under these sections of the law, whose terms lend themselves to broad interpretation. Article 29 reaffirms the government’s right to ban Moroccan or foreign newspapers if they are “likely to pose a danger to Islam, the monarchic institution, territorial integrity or public order.” Largely because of his criticism of this law, National Moroccan Press Union secretary-general Younès Moujahid was fired from his job as a journalist with the daily Al Ittihad Al Ichtiraki by its editor, Abderrahmane Youssoufi, who was then also prime minister. In the view of Khalid Jamaï, an editorialist with Le Journal Hebdomadaire, “this press law reflects the government’s indecision, moving forward in one area, moving back in another.” The draft anti-terrorist law or “Laânigri law”An anti-terrorist bill submitted to parliament at the start of 2003 sparked a civil society outcry. Le Journal Hebdomadaire commented on 25 January: “The justice, interior and foreign ministries are just the underlings in this project, hired hands who busily tailored a respectable costume specially for the DST, to legalize what the DST already does, which is to kidnap people, shut them away, deprive them of all legal aid, and cut them off from all means of communication.” The newspaper added: “This bill, when is passes all its exams, will just end up giving the DST an additional weapon which it didn’t particularly need.” It is paragraph 12 of the bill’s first article that is particularly worrying for press freedom. It says that “propaganda, publicity or defence of an act constituting a terrorist offence” is itself to be considered a terrorist act. The concept of “publicity” is so vague that it could be construed to mean any report or article about an act of terrorism. Some hold that, by allowing arbitrary interpretation, it puts journalists at the mercy of the authorities and thereby limits their freedom. It is worth noting that the bill was submitted to parliament shortly after several newspapers carried reports about such DST abuses as the secret detention at the start of 2003 of Islamists accused of terrorism.As a result of pressure from human rights organisations, the government withdrew the bill in mid-April so that it could be amended. Nonetheless, several journalists told Reporters Without Borders they doubted that the contentious sections will have been removed when it is resubmitted.6. Surveillance of foreign pressSome foreign reporters, such as Ignacio Cembrero of the Spanish daily El País, are out of favour in Morocco. After being followed in March 2002, he was again followed on 1 October 2002 for several hours in Casablanca by four persons he identified as members of the DST. Cembrero thought this was meant to signal displeasure with the meeting he had the day before with former interior minister Driss Basri at his home near Rabat.British freelance journalist Nicolas Pelham was “banned from entering the country” without any explanation when he arrived at Tangier’s Ibn Battuta airport on 22 January 2002. After being held overnight in the airport terminal, he was flown at dawn to Casablanca and put on a flight for London via Madrid. He had come to do a report on emigration for the BBC.”Al-Jazeera continues do its news-gathering work freely,” communication minister Nabil Benabdallah said in a statement, much to the annoyance of the pan-Arab TV news network’s correspondent in Morocco, Iqbal Ilhami. “Free to work? What’s the good of preparing a report if I cannot broadcast it?” she protested. The origin of this friction was an incident on 30 March, when Ilhami covered a demonstration against the war in Iraq, interviewing a government minister and the banned satirist Bziz. After preparing her report, Ilhami went to the headquarters of the Moroccan state-owned radio and TV broadcaster RTM to send it via satellite to Doha, the capital of Qatar, where Al-Jazeera has its headquarters. Al-Jazeera has an agreement with RTM for this service. But on 30 March, Ilhami waited in vain for her report to be sent. At first, an RTM employee claimed that he had not received a required fax from Doha. So Ilhami contacted the communication minister, Benabdallah, who said he did not know what had happened and promised to find out. A few hours later, Ilhami called the minister again. This time, he confirmed that the report had been censored and said he took responsibility. “You must be more cooperative with us and you must guarantee that in future there willbe no more reports that threaten public order,” he said. “They hadn’t appreciated it when, previously, we showed Moroccans burning an American flag,” Ilhami said. “I had been told then that Fouad Ali Al Himma (the minister delegate to Interior) was unhappy. That didn’t happen at the second demonstration.” Communication ministry officials defended RTM’s decision on the grounds that Al-Jazeera had already allegedly broadcast several “false reports” which it “had not deigned to correct.” Reporters Without Borders was given a copy of a fax sent by the US embassy in Morocco to the Maghreb Arabe Presse (MAP), the official news agency, saying that the embassy had remained open, contrary to what Al-Jazeera had reported.The communication minister’s statement said Al-Jazeera could always use a private company to send its reports to Doha by satellite. But several persons told Reporters Without Borders there are no private companies with this capability in Morocco. This means Al-Jazeera is subject to de facto censorship.The French daily Le Monde was to have begun printing all its locally-sold copies in Morocco on 14 April. The newspaper had been negotiating with the authorities for months so that a Morocco edition could be printed by Ecoprint, the company that prints the daily L’Economiste. But the decision needed a ministerial decree. The date of the planned launch was also set aside for the start of a series of reports by Stephen Smith on Morocco in the newspaper’s “Horizon” section. Why did local printing of Le Monde not start on 14 April? The Moroccan authorities complained that the newspaper sent out invitation cards before the decree had been issued. But some Moroccan journalists saw the delay as a warning to Le Monde, which is known for not sparing the Moroccan regime in its reports.7. Other forms of pressure: advertising and subsidiesThe emergence of new publications has made the advertising market more competitive, but it is the editorial line of each publication that seems to influence advertisers’ preferences as much as circulation, especially as Morocco has no entity that independently verifies circulation figures. In 2002, the Arabic-language weekly Al Ayyam ran an interview with lawyer and human rights activist Abderrahim Berrada on the front page with a headline that said the king should apologise for the mistakes of the past. While the newspaper was being printed, editor Nordine Miftah received a call from an advertiser who said: “Either you change your front page or I withdraw my advertisement.” How did the advertiser know what was on the front page unless he was tipped off by someone in the printing works? The editor did not budge, and he lost the advertiser.The advertising revenue of Mediatrust (the group that publishes Le Journal Hebdomadaire and Assahifa Ousbouiya) fell by 80 per cent from 2000 to 2002. “There was an obvious boycott of our publications,” said Le Journal Hebdomadaire editor Ali Amar. “Some companies such as Maroc Telecom and Royal Air Maroc received instructions to stop giving us advertising. Others chose to boycott us because they did not want to be associated with our editorial line.” Lmrabet, for his part, lost all his advertising long ago, and after knocking on the doors of many advertisers, he realised there was no point trying to get it back.The late King Hassan’s interior minister, Driss Basri, established a system of subsidies for the newspapers of the political parties represented in parliament. This was later extended to some of the newer, independent newspapers such as Al Ahdate Al Maghribia. “We get a subsidy because we are Morocco’s biggest-circulation newspaper and our accounts are transparent,” said Tahar Meddoun, the head of the Al Ahdate Al Maghribia printing works. Some journalists nonetheless maintain that editorial line is the main criteria in awarding subsidies.”Sure, the political party newspapers get help from the state, but the real gift for them is not being asked to pay what they owe the banks,” explained journalist Khalid Jamaï. “If they had to pay, many newspapers would go bankrupt.” Here again, the rules are not the same for everyone. Ali Amar of Le Journal Hebdomadaire said: “We were the first newspaper to get squeezed, while other newspapers with millions of dirhams in debts were able to get their payments rescheduled over several years.” National Moroccan Press Union secretary-general Younès Moujahid denounced both these practices and other, even more questionable methods of financing: “Some newspapers survive without advertising or any other (visible) income. How do you think they manage? It’s the (security) services who pay them.” June 8, 2021 Find out more NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists Newscenter_img to go further Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Organisation “A gigantic blunder” , “grotesque” , “ridiculous in the extreme” – such were the reactions of the press at the end of April to the prosecution of Ali Lmrabet, editor of the French-language weekly Demain Magazine and the Arabic-language weekly Douman, on charges that include “insulting the person of the king” for which he faces three to five years in prison under the new press law. Lmrabet assumed the authorities could go no further than this in their harassment. But he had underestimated their determination to silence him. In early May, he learned that his printers were no longer willing to print his two newspapers.The Moroccan press has blossomed since the late 1990s, especially during the final years of the reign of the late King Hassan II. Government opponents of all kinds have been able to express themselves in the opinion pages of a range of independent newspapers, which have gradually broken taboos, turned political reporting and analysis into an everyday topic, and stolen readers from the now ailing political party organs.But the new outspokenness has alarmed the country’s rulers. As early as two years ago, in an interview in July 2001 for the London-based, Arabic-language newspaper Al Sharq Al Awsat, King Mohammed VI voiced his concerns: “Of course I am in favour of press freedom. But I would like this freedom to be a responsible one… Journalists aren’t angels, after all. Personally, I appreciate the role of critic played by the Moroccan press and journalists in public debate. But let’s avoid giving in to the temptation of the imported model. Otherwise our own values will be undermined and individual freedoms will be jeopardised… The law sets limits… It must apply to everyone. When the press speaks of human rights, it sometimes forgets to respect those rights itself.”In the view of Khalid Jamaï, an editorial writer for the Le Journal Hebdomadaire and a contributor to the daily L’Indépendant, Morocco’s political parties do not yet fulfill the role of a proper opposition and the independent newspapers fill the gap. “So the government sees them as opponents, as parties, as rivals and even as enemies.” Lmrabet’s case illustrates the problems facing independent newspapers now – the lack of independent courts, the difficulty of tackling such sensitive issues as the person of the king, a law that maintains prison sentences for press offences, growing interference by state security agents, advertising boycotts and pressure on advertisers and printers.A Reporters Without Borders representative went to Morocco (to Casablanca and Rabat) from 22 to 27 April, meeting with journalists, writers, human rights activists and lawyers. The representative asked to speak with officials in the communication and justice ministries and the Directorate of Territorial Security (DST) but was only received by senior officials in the communication ministry. There were no restrictions on her movements and she was able to meet with people freely. Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa Conclusion”We would like to reiterate our firm resolve to consolidate press freedom, preserve news diversity and ensure the modernisation of this sector, which is one of the pillars of our project for a modernised, democratic society,” King Mohammed said on 15 November 2002.The Moroccan press is without a doubt nowadays one of the freest in the Arab world, especially since the end of King Hassan’s reign. In recent years, independent newspapers have broken many taboos and exposed many scandals such as the participation of the Moroccan left in the 1972 coup attempt against King Hassan, cases of corruption implicating political personalities and the lack of transparency in the September 2002 legislative elections. These revelations have ruffled feathers, as has the emergence of satire and caricature in the print media.Often displeased by their outspokenness, the regime has reacted in different ways to rein in the enthusiasm of the new generation of journalists: sometimes head-on, banning three weeklies at the end of 2000, sometimes indirectly, by means of pressure on advertisers and printers. It has also used its legislative armoury, as in the case of Lmrabet.Hassan Nejmi, president of the Union of Moroccan Writers, believes that: “There two forces currently in play. On the one side, the security service people think Moroccans just need one thing, the stick. They are completely allergic to press freedom. On the other side, there are those who think you shouldn’t cling to old reflexes. They support civil society and the independent press.” The authorities, of course, deny wanting to restrict freedom of expression. “It’s a mistake to say there is a desire to stifle press freedom,” said Khalil Idrissi, chief of staff at the communication ministry. The reforms announced by his ministry in April are a proof of this, he said. They include broadcasting reform, raising standards in the print media, and developing the advertising industry.Who is behind the censorship in Morocco? The king? The interior minister? The communication minister? The justice minister? The head of the DST? It is sometimes hard to say who is responsible. It would an exaggeration to say that there is a government plan to gag the independent press. But the harassment of journalists in the courts, the coercive legislation and the low blows against certain journalists are worrying signs. RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance RecommendationsReporters Without Borders recommends that the Moroccan authorities should:- amend Law No. 77-00 of 3 October 2002 . so that press offences are no longer punishable by prison terms, as required by the UN special rapporteur on the promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression. On 18 January 2000, the rapporteur called on all governments “to ensure that press crimes are no longer subject to prison sentences except for crimes such as racist or discriminatory comments or appeals for violence.” He said the imposition of a prison sentence for the peaceful expression of opinion “constitutes a serious violation of human rights.” . so that in the second part of article 41, the terms “offence to Islam, the monarchy or territorial integrity” are precisely defined, as they lend themselves to broad interpretation.- define more precisely the terms of paragraph 12 of article 1 of the anti-terrorist bill, especially the references to “propaganda” and “publicity” of an act constituting a terrorist offence. – ensure that telephone tapping is not carried without the authorisation of an investigating judge.- ensure that government subsidies and advertising, and the advertising of state agencies and parastatal entities are assigned to newspapers in full transparency, above all on the basis of circulation.- put an end to the de facto ban on Rissalat Al Foutouwa et Al-Jazira. May 13, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Warnings for the independent press Reports Reporters Without Borders recommends that the European Union should:- intervene with the Moroccan authorities to ensure that they respect article 2 of the association agreement between the European Union and Morocco. This articles says: “Respect for the democratic principles and fundamental human rights established by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights shall inspire the domestic and external policies of the Community and of Morocco and shall constitute an essential element of this agreement.” April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Donkey foal was left for dead in County Limerick

first_imgLimerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories TAGSGalballylimerickLimerick Animal WelfareThe Donkey Sanctuary WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Linkedin Facebook Previous articleMunster schools Cup ties announcedNext articleIMPACT welcomes backing of IASS pension deal by Aer Lingus shareholders. Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img NewsLocal NewsDonkey foal was left for dead in County LimerickBy Alan Jacques – December 11, 2014 826 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A DONKEY foal is recovering this week after being tied to a skip and left for dead at a horse fair in County Limerick.The five-month-old foal, which was abandoned in Galbally, has since been taken into the Donkey Sanctuary’s care in County Cork. He has been fondly named ‘Baxter’ by volunteers at his new home in Mallow.Welfare adviser Katie Reed, who responded to the call by Limerick Animal Welfare commented, “This poor little foal was very distressed, standing in the rain and all tied up in ropes. He was very clearly frightened having been separated from his mum at such a young age and left all alone.”“I’m relieved we could help and he’s now safe in our care and will hopefully make a full recovery. Fortunately he was abandoned in a public place and was spotted in the nick of time,” said Ms Reed.Baxter is now reported to be doing well after having milk replacement pellets to replace his mother’s milk and to restore his strength.“We have no idea who dumped him. It’s rare that we would in cases like this. Often animals aren’t microchipped, which means their owners are difficult to trace. He was quite thin when we found him.”The Donkey Sanctuary has rescued 486 abandoned donkeys in Ireland between 2011 and 2013. Since it was founded in 1987, it has rescued over 4,200 donkeys and grown to be the largest equine charity in Ireland. For more information visit www.thedonkeysanctuary.ie. Email Print Advertisement WhatsApp Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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Current COVID-19 restrictions to remain in place up to May 18…

first_imgTechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick on Covid watch list Facebook Email WhatsApp TAGSCommunityhealthIrelandIrishLimerick City and CountyNationalNews Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? Previous articleHospital is in breach of Covid-19 regulationsNext articleA map showing 5km radius from your home Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] center_img Coronavirus | freepik.comCURRENT restrictions in place to reduce the spread of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) has been extended to May 18 with some changes to the restrictions.There will be two exceptions to the current restrictions which will take place from Tuesday, May 5, speaking today, An Taoiseach Leo Varadkar announced the 2km limit that is currently in place for exercise will be extended to a 5km radius.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The second exception will see over 70s who are currently cocooning will be allowed to leave their homes for a walk or drive within 5km so long as they do not have contact with others.After the extended restriction period to May 18, An Taoiseach announced a plan will be in place for the country to begin to “reopen” in five stages.From May 18, outdoor workers including builders and gardeners will be permitted to return to work, and from the same date some outdoor sporting activities in small groups will be able to resume.Schools and colleges are expected to reopen in September and October this year.More to follow… Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Linkedin Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste Advertisement Print Limerick Post Show | Careers & Health Sciences Event for TY Students NewsCommunityHealthCurrent COVID-19 restrictions to remain in place up to May 18 with two exceptionsBy Cian Reinhardt – May 1, 2020 623 last_img read more

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USPS mail delivery improving, but still ‘unacceptably low’: Senate Democrat

first_imgTom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images/PoolBy LUCIEN BRUGGEMAN, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Mail delivery standards in parts of the country remain well below levels prior to Postmaster General Louis DeJoy’s cost-cutting overhaul of the Postal Service in July, a new report from a Senate Democrat found Friday, casting renewed scrutiny on the beleaguered agency and its controversial leader.“It is unacceptable that on-time mail delivery has not been restored to levels prior to the Postmaster General carelessly instituting his disastrous operational changes,” said Michigan Sen. Gary Peters, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.First-class mail across the country was delivered on-time in 85.6% of cases in mid-October, down from an average of 91% earlier this year, according to a report Peters published late Friday.After DeJoy put in place a series of measures meant to curb wasted trips for mail carriers and cut employees’ overtime, first-class mail performance plummeted to 81.5% in August, according to the report.Peters’ analysis, which collated data provided to him by the Postal Service, noted that several major cities, including Baltimore, Detroit and Philadelphia, are suffering the lowest percentage of on-time deliveries.“While the Postal Service has made some improvements since congressional oversight and federal litigation against Postmaster General DeJoy’s actions began,” Peters wrote in the report, “on-time delivery levels remain unacceptably low.”The U.S. Postal Service did not immediately respond to a request for comment from ABC News.Despite the bleak portrait painted in Peters’ report, one figure will alleviate some of Americans’ anxiety: election mail is performing well.While comprehensive data was not available, Peters wrote that “recent USPS data shows that on-time processing rates for the subset of election mail able to be tracked is above 90%.”DeJoy, a longtime logistics company executive, faced backlash within months of taking the helm at the Postal Service in June for putting in place measures that critics said would slow mail service.His changes coincided with unfounded rhetoric from President Donald Trump casting doubt on the efficacy of mail-in voting, prompting allegations that DeJoy’s overhaul might indirectly serve to support the president’s claims. The Postal Service has consistently maintained that it is committed to delivering election mail on time, but in a letter to lawmakers in August, DeJoy acknowledged that his reforms had led to some “unintended consequences.”In the intervening months, the Postal Service has suffered multiple defeats in federal courts across the country stemming from lawsuits that challenged DeJoy’s overhaul. In September, the agency said it would halt all operational changes until after November.More Americans than ever are expected to vote by mail in the upcoming presidential election. With nearly two weeks until Election Day, more than 52 million votes have already been cast and at least 85.5 million ballots have been requested, according to the U.S. Elections Project, run by University of Florida professor Michael McDonald.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 4/11/19

first_imgApril 12, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 4/11/19 Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Thursday’s sports events:MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALLAMERICAN LEAGUEOakland 8 Baltimore 5Cleveland 4 Detroit 0Seattle 7 Kansas City 6, 10 InningsBoston 7 Toronto 6NATIONAL LEAGUECincinnati 5 Miami 0St. Louis 11 L-A Dodgers 7NY Mets 6 Atlanta 3Chi Cubs 2 Pittsburgh 0San Francisco 1 Colorado 0San Diego 7 Arizona 6NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE PLAYOFFSToronto 4 Boston 1Washington 4 Carolina 2Calgary 4 Colorado 0Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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